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  • Series Premiere Date: Nov 13, 2018
She-Ra and the Princesses of Power Image
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  4. Fourth Review

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User Score
5.0

Mixed or average reviews- based on 88 Ratings

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  • Summary: The reboot of the 1980s cartoon finds the orphaned Adora (voiced by Aimee Carrero) leaving her life with the evil Horde after discovering the truth when the Sword of Protection transforms her into warrior princess She-Ra. She joins the rebellion against the Horde that includes Glimmer (KarenThe reboot of the 1980s cartoon finds the orphaned Adora (voiced by Aimee Carrero) leaving her life with the evil Horde after discovering the truth when the Sword of Protection transforms her into warrior princess She-Ra. She joins the rebellion against the Horde that includes Glimmer (Karen Fukuhara), Bow (Marcus Scribner), and Catra (AJ Michalka). Expand
  • Genre(s): Animation, Action & Adventure, Kids
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 2 out of 2
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 2
  3. Negative: 0 out of 2
  1. Reviewed by: Darren Franich
    Nov 8, 2018
    83
    Stevenson honors the basic plot layout and the birthday-cake radiance of old-school She-Ra. But the original cast of characters has been casually diversified, and newly illustrated to boldly suggest human beings have all shapes and sizes.
  2. Reviewed by: Alex Abad-Santos
    Nov 21, 2018
    80
    In rebooting the beloved series, Stevenson has created something special, a cartoon that both honors and improves on the original by amplifying its characters’ feelings, and emits equal parts electricity, joy, and warmth. Like its titular hero, She-Ra is so full of heart that it’s easy to recognize its humanity, even with all the super-powered hijinks going on.
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 25 out of 40
  2. Negative: 13 out of 40
  1. Dec 16, 2018
    10
    The voice acting? Amazing. The story? Outstanding. The characters? Breathtaking. The twists, turns and nail-biting suspense that the show isThe voice acting? Amazing. The story? Outstanding. The characters? Breathtaking. The twists, turns and nail-biting suspense that the show is known for? Yes ma'am. She-Ra is back, and it's better than ever. Expand
  2. Nov 17, 2018
    10
    I'd actually give this show a 7-8.

    Overall it's a solid and entertaining show. Kids and animation buffs will enjoy it. It's not
    I'd actually give this show a 7-8.

    Overall it's a solid and entertaining show. Kids and animation buffs will enjoy it. It's not groundbreaking by any means but neither is it some insidious agenda laden SJW piece the anti-PC Redhat outrage culture has tried to demonize it as.

    She-ra does a good job portraying a wide array of unique and interesting character designs, all with unique personalities. I do wish the supporting cast were shown a touch more depth, but first seasons often tend to skim a bit shallow before diving deeper.

    But overall She-ra's characters, world building and overall narrative chug along and a solid pace and make for an entertaining watch. It gives the princesses a bit of an introduction and exposition. Though it does feel a bit light for how prominent they are meant to be. Another personal flaw is the first arc feels a bit short. It should have gotten 2 extra episodes to let Adora, She-ra and her revelation to go to the Rebellion marinate a bit longer as it does feel abrupt.

    The animation is attractive and solid. The character designs are charming and the environments follow suit. I wouldn't call it the show's strong point but it fits the overall tone quite well. It's not a high budget show, so don't expect Avatar level choreography. Nor does it try aping She-ra's old aesthetic of ultra detailed images that posed and moved jerkily because they opted for poses and not fluid animation.

    As mentioned before, the moralizing's pretty generic: Friendship, coming of age and isolation vs community. This is not identity politics, this is classic cartoon fantasy morals 101. The show does portray characters and princesses of varying body types and skin tones, taking a wise approach of showing them as a matter of fact. It doesn't even mention whether skin color is an issue, hell, there are half humans out there and it doesn't even nod to an issue with half scorpions and Khajit like half cats. If anything it could be condemned for passing over the subject matter.

    Because idiots just slap a 1 review without bothering to watch it, I gave it a 10. If people want to be stupid, I shall provide counterweights.

    The hate's largely because they think it's an "Identity politics" show.

    The Truth: It's a kids show filled with friends, adventure and coming of age. It's seriously lacking in any "beat you over the head" moralizing aside from "don't be evil" and "friendship is important" which is something nearly every fantasy show tells you. By the She-ra haters standards I guess identity politics has infected Lord of the Rings too since it promotes globalism (Fellowship amongst different races?!) and inter racial marriage (Elves and humans marrying?!!). But logic has never been their strong point.
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  3. Nov 15, 2018
    10
    A great show with great characters. Please ignore the 40yo dudes that hates this shows without watching it just because they hate women.
  4. Dec 16, 2018
    9
    One of the best cartoons of the year. The writing is clever, unpredictable, and isn't out of place. The story isn't bland and stays strongOne of the best cartoons of the year. The writing is clever, unpredictable, and isn't out of place. The story isn't bland and stays strong throughout the season, which does not fall flat because everything has a purpose. And the story with their """forced""" politics still manages to trigger the right. The characters have to be the best part of the show. They all have unique personalities, really good and convincing chemistry between each other. Over all and amazing show definatably worth a watch. Expand
  5. Nov 20, 2018
    4
    This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. For the honour of Greyskull: let's start with the good.

    - Fairly faithful to the original design, such as Swiftwind's wings, She-ra's outfit, Shadow Weaver, Hordak, the backgrounds, Bow's weird midriff thing (yes, fellow reviewers, that was in the original as well: don't freak out), general colour schemes etc.
    - More or less faithful to the origin story as well: Adora, in 1985, did start out as a Force Captain for Hordak's Evil Horde until He-Man saved her. She has the same position and revelation as back then, so no issues here. (the omission of He-Man is a blessing: imagine how poorly done he'd have been)
    - The voice acting is... decent.
    - The character diversity is perfectly fine.

    And now... for the bad, which is why this is only a 4.
    - Animation style and quality is quite low: it looks like something cheap on Cartoon Network, with very flat, sharp designs.
    - The music is so-so.
    - Adora's transformation into She-ra is... odd. See, Adora is quite clearly female: she's got the right curves, and her facial design is clearly feminine. But when she becomes She-ra, she becomes... mannish. Very much so, in fact. Her shoulders and waist become more rectangular, thus giving her a more masculine look, her face gets squarer, and her general increased size lends a certain... androgynous feel to her design. It is like the animators went for something with She-ra's clothes and hair, but a teenage boy's body. It's weird.
    - Ironically, Glimmer, being drawn as a heavy girl, has the power that lets her skip physical exercise.
    - Boys are stupid, girls rule.
    - Adults are even stupider, teens rule.
    - This is not "our generation's Avatar: the Last Airbender". This is so far from ATLA, it may as well be... Korra. Yeah, I said it: it's as bad as Korra. Not based on animation, of course, but story and characters (of course, we have yet to see if Adora or Glimmer turns out to be a raging b*tch like Korra was from episode 1 to... book four?)
    - She-ra transformation solves everything. Oh no, we're about to die! She-ra walks in, shiny, swings her sword, everything is solved. Also, her fighting prowess is so inconsistent.

    All in all, it's... eh. There are better shows, the original included, but it's not a zero.
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  6. Nov 21, 2018
    1
    This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. All the male characters are incompetent posers, all the women characters can do no wrong. It's actually very boring, and not a lot happens. The Horde never feels like a real threat, and the Rebellion comes off as not really knowing what they are doing. There is a major plot hole in the timeline; Glimmer and the other Princesses of Power's parents had a Great Alliance that the Horde apparently broke decades ago. So, why does the Horde seem like they have just arrived and set up shop just before Adora defects? Also, the link between Greyskull, Light Hope and the First Ones is not really explored at all. They have a few episodes where the characters stumble into First Ones' ruins but it's used for cheap shots at Google Assistant (no, really!) and very little is actually discovered.

    I also somehow think that the writers and producers have very little contact and/or experience with kids. If you look at the other hit shows like Paw Patrol or Peppa Pig, they are based on episodes that can be picked up and watched over and over again because there is no story arch that stretches over the whole series. The original Masters of the Universe understood this, too. She-ra has no such consideration and so the ability to choose a favorite episode and re-watch it five or six times (talking about kids here) is absent.
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  7. Jan 18, 2019
    0
    I am disappointed. I was expecting more. The only thing that I like is the storyline between She-ra and Catra. Every story has a hero and aI am disappointed. I was expecting more. The only thing that I like is the storyline between She-ra and Catra. Every story has a hero and a villain. They just added some drama. What I like most about the original She-ra version is the moral/life-lesson that is imparted at every end of the show. Both show is about fighting so a little life-lesson is a really good idea, especially when children are involved. There are more normal life and social interaction in the original than I see in most cartoons. You see a lot of different types of people (old, young short, tall, thin and so forth) interacting with one another similar to real-life. There is more depth in the story. Yes, the new She-ra is for the very young, but they did went all the way with it. I don't really see any diversity, except they added more characters of different ethnicity. I missed the original She-ra. She shows a lot of examples of strength of character and moral compass when confronted with difficult situations. I also like the fact that the comic characters look more life-like in the original, and not looking like an ani-me. You can tell a lot of work and preparation was put into it. They just don't make cartoons like they used to. I have a feeling the people, involved in the new She-ra version, did not watch the Original She-ra from the very beginning. I think they just watch the end to get a feel of the characters, and decided to make their own story. I said that because the characters "Perfuma" and "Marmista" were introduced closer to the end of season 1, if I am not mistaken. I watched She-ra on Netflix all the time, when they have not excluded it yet. I remembered the episode that Perfuma and Marmista was first introduced, and it was one of the most funniest original She-ra episodes. I had fun watching it. I think I will look for the original She-ra on DVD. Expand

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