The Playlist's Scores

  • Movies
For 2,569 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Tu Dors Nicole
Lowest review score: 0 Self/less
Score distribution:
2569 movie reviews
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    What we are left with is far from a perfect film, but Laurent is a confident director who elevates the pulpy plot of Pizzolato’s novel into a unique reflection of characters on the margins of society. It, also, probably doesn’t hurt that she has Foster and Fanning at the top of their game to deliver the material.
  1. It’s a cast full of the sort of faces that regularly pop up on ones-to-watch lists, and it’s the biggest thing that Been So Long has going for it. “Chewing Gum” fans will know how talented Coel is, but she’s particularly good here with a role that’s more adult and serious than her breakout turn (while still letting her have some fun occasionally).
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The film is all at once a genuine, crowd-pleasing barnstormer and an uncomfortably identifiable personal theme park 4D experience.
  2. The young couple exists in a bubble of love that has an air of reality sucked right out of it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    An interesting, but ultimately light and frothy, Parisian rom-com that flies by at a breezy 73 minutes, A Faithful Man does alright for itself despite a few baked in flaws.
  3. When all’s said and done, Wobble Palace is trying so hard you can’t help but like it.
  4. This unintentionally hilarious take, on territory covered much more soberly and with far less reliance on prosthetic bellies in current Netflix hit “Narcos,” is so trashy it may even make you forget a few things you knew before.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Tea with the Dames is absolutely charming and surprisingly emotional.
  5. Venom isn’t sure what film it wants to be, and it makes for an unintelligible, queasy roller coaster ride.
  6. With Bad Times at the El Royale Goddard’s comparatively leisurely pace may disappoint the more impatient, splatter-hungry genre-hounds in his fanbase, but for the rest of us, he has made impressive, enjoyable and gorgeous-to-look-at work of his “difficult second album” by defying expectations in a different way: broadening his scope, deepening his craft and letting the Bad Times roll.
  7. Tyrel boasts some fine performances and some compelling ideas, but ultimately, it plays like a version of Jordan Peele‘s “Get Out” where nothing happens.
  8. Raw, improvised and indicative of Trump’s America, The Oath reminds viewers of the need for laughter despite the downtrodden insanity around us. Thankfully, Barinholtz resists the urge to lapse into cynicism, because at the end of the day people are more important than politics.
  9. Despite its tendency to lean upon self-serious reimaginings, it is nonetheless an engaging and tenderly drawn film that is likely to resonate with anyone who has had to do the tireless work of sorting through an estate of a family member.
  10. The House With A Clock On Its Walls has its fair share of charms, but it doesn’t leave you spellbound.
  11. There’s a line for an audience between conveying the true horror of what occurred and being excessive and Maras barely avoids the latter.
  12. The set-up in Free Solo can sometimes be repetitive, as the filmmakers continuously fawn over their subject’s accomplishments in the nerve-racking build-up to the main event. However, the absorbing lure of the movie, the climactic, terror-provoking Yosemite climb itself, is overwhelming and worth the wait.
  13. Feeling stilted and steeped in uninspired biopic tropes, Kelly’s film never comes close to an inventiveness worthy of JT’s imaginative, outrageous story.
  14. Minghella surely knew that what he had here was a familiar story, but despite his gritty and admirable direction it fails to break the traditional formula.
  15. Aside from the striking scenes occurring on the battlefronts, everything else in this picture is subpar. “A Private War” works off a disjointed script and tells a dull story, populated with forgettable characters. Pike throws herself into Marie, and the intensity of her commitment is palpable, but the flashy performance feels soulless.
  16. Maybe someday, Jennifer Garner will be given a project that proves her talents once again. For now, though, we’re left with Peppermint: a wretched action misfire that leaves a bad taste in your mouth.
  17. Our Time is gorgeously shot, naturally, and the intentions are well-meaning but far too self-serving.
  18. Moore plays Gloria with a twinkle in her eye that makes her lovable and a yearning for connection that makes her relatable.
  19. Holofcener knows human pathos, the melancholic, absurdist tragedy of it all, the laughter, the tears, the dark biting irony. She understands human behavior and her sharp, well-observed ‘Land Of Steady Habits’ is as lovely and near amazing as anything she’s made thus far.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Though equipped with a ton of bravado and ambition, Austin Vesely falls short of crafting a great horror comedy, B-movie classic and Slice just doesn’t make the cut.
  20. As surely as a hiker extending her arms in the middle of an undulating lava field, Iceland has arrived, with a startling movie that’s every bit as idiosyncratic, homely, and dynamic as its country of origin.
  21. At its best, it’s a moody, scary, post-Peckinpah meditation on masculinity — and an all too rare opportunity to see Mr. Wright fronting a feature.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    The Chesters have created something truly stunning and want to share it with the world. I’m sold on the lifestyle but as a film, their approach doesn’t make for the most compelling drama.
  22. With all this evocative material available it’s unfortunate that Kent lavishes so much of the overgenerous runtime on repetitive and redundant plotting.
  23. So much does not connect here and so much is designed to discomfit that there is unexpected resonance when Alverson lays aside the scabrousness and puts down oddball drollery to remind us that inside every lonely young man, there’s a shivering kid waiting to be picked up and brought in from the snow.
  24. Maya is full of the kind of tiny, keenly observed moments that make Løve such a special filmmaker.

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