Push Square's Scores

  • Games
For 1,823 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 8% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 The Unfinished Swan
Lowest review score: 10 Yasai Ninja
Score distribution:
1824 game reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The Lost Child isn't a game bereft of merit, and we're sure that there's a number of people who'll enjoy the visual novel slash first person dungeon crawler approach taken here. But it's certainly a game with limited appeal - even among the role playing game demographic - thanks to the lifeless battles and cumbrous dungeon design. It's a game that pays more than a passing nod to numerous other RPGs - Pokemon, Persona, and other Shin Megami Tensei titles - but sadly, never approaches the quality of any of them.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Late in the game, one of the characters has a line where he says “I am a miserable, unfortunate man.” We can’t think of a more perfect way to describe playing this title. From a team capable of making a game as exceptional as Fated: The Silent Oath, the quality of work, or lack thereof, on display here stings.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Jurassic World Evolution sits happily in the difficulty sweet spot: it's easy enough to pick up and play that park builder novices will likely have a good time, but it's involved enough that genre veterans should enjoy it as an amusing diversion between more hardcore titles. While there's a couple of tedious processes involved, building a park is generally entertaining, and dinosaur fans – who isn't a dinosaur fan? – will likely be enamoured with the array of creatures available, and the mischief they can get up to.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    What started out as a Kickstarter three years ago, Shape of the World is an impressive accomplishment. The end result provides a beautiful but brief escape into an obscure world, filled with colourful abstract variations and creatures to observe at your own pace. It makes for a great escapist title in between games, though we're ultimately left feeling a little confused by its mixed messaging and lack of story. It hints at something greater here, but doesn’t feel confident to make a bolder or more meaningful statement. Maybe that’s what Hollow Tree Games had intended, but we can’t shake the feeling of style over substance here.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    BlazBlue: Cross Tag Battle is an incredibly entertaining fighter that hinges on some brilliantly crafted team mechanics, so it's a real shame that the overall product is cloaked in controversy. Accessible yet open-ended and deep, Arc System Works' latest is slick and expressive, but it's the questionable DLC practices that ultimately muddy the waters.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is a very straightforward port of Far Cry 3, a game loved and loathed in equal measure. The Classic Edition is a great way for newcomers to experience one of the best games in the series, despite some clunky controls. Many people will have made up their mind about Jason's journey years ago, but on its own merit, this is a competent re-release of a fun, if a little dated, open world shooter.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Onrush is a chaotic arcade game that surprisingly comes together – even if there are question marks regarding its longevity. This brash vehicular experience draws inspiration from several different areas of the industry, but it reassembles them into something unusual and entertaining. A great online infrastructure means you can be in and out of the action in seconds, but the package could do with a little more meat on its bones to fully justify its price tag.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Vampyr has a ton of interesting ideas, an intriguing world, and a great cast of characters, but is ultimately let down by its narrow-minded focus on unnecessary combat.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Despite bringing a few new mechanics to the table, Far Cry 5: Hours of Darkness is a lesser experience when compared to the base game in every possible way. Its story is almost non-existent, the open world is completely generic, and with a fair few features from the original experience missing, it all feels like a step back. The core of what makes this a Far Cry game is still present, but you were probably already tired of that long ago.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Along Together serves up a fun virtual reality experience that doesn’t attempt to do anything new, but rather refines mechanics introduced by others. It's mildly challenging puzzles won’t present much of a roadblock in your path to progress, besides the unintuitive junkyard location, and so an afternoon’s worth of enjoyment is around about where your expectations should lie.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Gorogoa is an immaculate puzzle game. Gorgeous art, beautiful but ominous ambient music, and mind-blowingly clever design combine for something special. It's a game like nothing we've ever played before, and with a modest run-time and low price-point to boot, you have no reason not to snag this outstanding experience.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A depiction of hell that hasn't really been fully realised before, Agony is marred by frustrating stealth sections and some poorly explained mechanics. The horrifying imagery is generally effective and the overall presentation manages to survive some glaring technical issues, but this is very much an acquired taste in every sense of the word.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While Milanoir does a whole lot of things right with its fair share of positives and highly stylized aspects, it still manages to drop the ball on some key elements like crucial gameplay mechanics. Regardless, this game is a fun play, and we'd say it's definitely worth your money, assuming you are looking more for a solid story and over the top experience than you are for the smoothest, frame-perfect gameplay.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Street Fighter 30th Anniversary Collection does exactly what it says on the tin. It's a lovely compendium of every single Street Fighter from the arcade original right up to Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike. Fans of the franchise will really appreciate having so many entries in a single place, and the wealth of customisation options, online modes, and extra content in the museum will go down a real storm.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Yoku's Island Express is one of the most surprising games of 2018. The combination of pinball and Metroidvania is, on paper at least, a little like dipping your French fries into your milkshake; as good as the two elements are separately, they shouldn't really work together. But thanks to an array of smart design choices, a wonderful art style, and some genuinely inventive puzzles, Yoku's Island Express is a game that only rarely frustrates – and frequently delights.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Moonlighter is a delightful mix of action RPG, rogue-lite dungeon crawling, and shopkeeping sim with an ingenious gameplay loop that'll have you hooked. The way the game's contrasting parts blend into one another means you're always making progress, and it feels great. Exploring the dungeons is challenging and fun, and managing the shop is addictive, thanks to an intelligent economy system. There are some rough edges, such as complex menu screens and one or two minor bugs, but when this game gets its hooks in, you won't care. Shopping around for your new favourite indie? Look no further.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    PixelJunk Monsters 2 is a brave sequel that attempts to fix something that isn't broken, and has ended up taking away more than it adds. The 3D graphics are gorgeous, but the game is less readable as a result, and maintaining all your towers is more difficult when you can't see them all at once. However, the root of what makes these games special shines through, and when you're slaying enemies in a perfectly executed run, the flaws fade away, and you're left with a delightfully satisfying tower defence title that almost anyone can enjoy.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A very generous package, offering over 50 16-bit titles for a very reasonable price. The emulation is of a very high standard, and quality of life improvements such as game saves make the often tough titles more digestible. Online play, leaderboards, and challenges help flesh it all out, too, giving you a decent amount of extras on top of the broad range of action games, RPGs, platformers, and everything in between. For many, the nostalgia overload will be enough to spur on a purchase, but those who may have missed out on the Mega Drive will find that this is an ideal way to experience its best titles -- if you can excuse some disappointing omissions.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Everspace is a fun and fast paced space exploration roguelike with beautiful visuals, solid combat, and rewarding progression systems. Unfortunately, it’s let down by regular crashes and major drops in frame rate throughout. Rockfish has created a slick ship in the form of Everspace - it just requires a few patches before it can take off.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    With a dearth of decent games based in the Warhammer 40k universe, Space Hulk: Deathwing seems at first glance to be heading in the right direction. With a reverence for the source material that’ll appeal to Warhammer 40K aficionados, it successfully evokes the space hulk setting and the relentless battles at its heart. While the basic building blocks of a decent experience seem to be here, the undeveloped gameplay, and repetitive structure – that degenerates into tiresome battles of attrition – mean that even transplanting it into the co-op multiplayer mode and adding more unlocks and rewards won’t be enough to keep your finger on the trigger for long.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Detroit: Become Human is vintage Quantic Dream, delivering a multifaceted choose-your-own-adventure that’s both ambitious and somewhat of an acquired taste. It’s clear that remarkable attention has been poured into the title's vision of the near-future, which makes it harder to suspend disbelief over some of its smaller narrative oversights. The game huffs-and-puffs, but never really brings anything new to its core theme of androids awakening to human emotions – and yet despite its relative familiarity, it’s an impressively replayable interactive story with a frightening number of variables of which there’s nothing else quite like.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Dark Souls Remastered is an excellent remaster of a standout entry in the Souls franchise. Those who played the original will feel right at home, and will really appreciate the visual and technical improvements – particularly to Blight Town, which now runs at a butter smooth 60 frames-per-second. However, those that weren't there at the beginning may not appreciate the inferior visuals and general jankiness that later entries have all but ironed out.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Omensight takes a lot of the ideas founded in Stories: The Path of Destinies and runs with them, successfully building on its predecessor with a very clever gameplay loop. While we doubt this repeating tale of the apocalypse will blow anyone away, Omensight is still a fine example of an interesting concept executed with style and confidence.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Little Witch Academia: Chamber of Time manages to capture the essence of the anime brilliantly. There’s plenty of fun to be had exploring Luna Nova as well as all the various dungeons. Some slow story pacing and frame rate drops let things down slightly, but if you’re a fan of the series, you should definitely pick this up.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Wizard of Legend is an enjoyable roguelike dungeon crawler with fun, fast-paced combat, beautifully crafted music, and pleasant pixel visuals that come together to form a fantastic fictional setting. Although the difficulty is steep and there is the occasional balancing issue, the available co-op modes are an excellent addition that help negate those problems.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Conan Exiles is a surprisingly good open world survival game that does a good job of blending genre mechanics with the harsh world of Conan the Barbarian. It's seriously addictive stuff despite general jankiness and a strange obsession with nudity, but the multiplayer is the real highlight. If you're looking for something new to play with your friends for a bit, look no further.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    When you find yourself in the zone, Laser League is a joy to play. Controls are as straightforward as they come and the game's rules are easy to follow, meaning anyone can pick up a pad and join in. However, the depth that comes with the various character classes, their abilities, and power ups is surprising. This is classic "easy to learn, difficult to master" territory, in other words, and whether you're playing online or offline, it can be excellent fun with a few friends.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Like its predecessors, Destiny 2: Warmind struggles to justify its price tag thanks to a throwaway campaign and some incredibly tired mission design. The quality of Destiny's core gameplay is still clear to see and the expansion as a whole is dotted with a handful of high points, but it ultimately just feels like the game is purposefully treading water until September's big arrival -- and that's simply not good enough.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Forgotton Anne has thrilled us in every possible way. Its story is packed to the rafters with charm, amazement, tension, and doubt. The gameplay satisfies in every key area with challenging puzzles and skilful platforming, and it’s these mechanics that get to accommodate a gorgeous art style which will live on long in our hearts. You need to experience Forgotton Anne for yourself, because the package as a whole is really quite special.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With Gone Home representing a key moment in gaming, Tacoma had plenty of potential to suffer from so called "second album syndrome". While it never manages to hit the same emotional highs – or lows – as its predecessor, it still stands out from the crowd, mainly through the implementation of some nicely interactive AR scenes to deliver its key story moments. While there are certainly other complaints you could level at Tacoma – such as its rigid linearity and how it occasionally falls into genre clichés – these can be easily forgotten as developer Fullbright once again proves where its strengths lie: with down-to-earth characters and thought-provoking storytelling.

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