Boston Globe's Scores

For 6,345 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 The Tao of Steve
Lowest review score: 0 Cocktail
Score distribution:
6345 movie reviews
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    How do you make a boring movie about this guy? Beats me, but director Ben Lewin has managed to pull it off. Based on Nicholas Dawidoff’s 1994 biography of the same title, The Catcher Was a Spy is a decorous, dutiful dogtrot that tells Berg’s story with excellent production values and a conspicuous lack of energy. In its tastefully dull fashion it wastes not only a fascinating subject but the mercurial actor playing him.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    You can go see Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom or you can save yourself the time and money by chugging a six-pack of Red Bull and running through the dinosaur exhibits at the Harvard Museum of Natural History until you can’t breathe. As experiences go, they’re equally adrenalizing and equally ephemeral.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s unnerving in ways that elude easy explanation and that slip under your skin and stay there.
  1. Hawke delivers a strong melancholy variation on his familiar emotional cool as Reverend Toller.
  2. Though not as graphically powerful as other documentaries on similar subjects, such as Fredrick Wiseman’s “Meat” (1976) or Georges Franju’s “Les Sang des Bête” (1949), the emphasis on the disastrous global impact of these practices is more disturbing .
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Hearts Beat Loud is gentle, funny, humane, and predictable, kept from becoming tiresome by a cast of pros that includes not only Offerman but Toni Collette as Frank’s landlady and possible love interest and a frisky Ted Danson as a philosophic stoner who owns the neighborhood watering hole.
  3. Tag
    What’s most unexpectedly gratifying is how much energy veteran standup director Jeff Tomsic and his splashy cast pour into ensuring that this is legit entertainment, packed with gonzo wit and even some sentiment.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Nancy is an eccentric, pungent gift of a film about a woman without identity played by an actress without persona.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The result is a clattery, unfocused affair that at times is more irritating than fun.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    High-concept, low-budget, proudly set-bound, Hotel Artemis shouldn’t work at all. Somehow, miraculously, it does.
  4. The drama palpably, potently conveys the group’s misgivings, their jangling nerves, the foolhardy resignation pushing them on despite themselves.
  5. In this semi-autobiographical period piece, Simón achieves the rare feat of faithfully recreating the mysterious consciousness of a child. Though her techniques can get repetitive and stall the narrative, more often than not her elliptical editing recreates an innocent’s perception of the slow drift of time.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s an eerie mood piece that slowly and surely tightens the thumb screws before all hell breaks loose; that and the fact that much of Hereditary takes place in one rambling dark house is evidence that Aster has spent a lot of time studying “The Shining,” “The Exorcist,” and “Rosemary’s Baby.” It’s nice to have a classicist back in town.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    We go to heist films to see the suckers get taken in high style. This one just robs us bland.
  6. For your two hours of discomfort, you will gain a better understanding of the insidious ways in which sexual predators work, and a clearer picture of how a victim’s denial and memory can conspire to bury the truth in the name of self-protection. You will also gain the experience of watching a wisely written, inventively directed, and extraordinarily acted story
  7. In his three-decade run, Rogers touched millions of souls. But the film is honest in questioning whether, in the end, he really made a difference.
  8. As he did with his "Everest" cast, Kormákur draws a strong, pathos-rich performance from Woodley, filled with moments of her character confronting her own mortality and looking back on safe choices not made. It’s solid drama, but also very slow going.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Throw out any expectations you might have of coherent narrative structure or directorial control, and you might have a pretty good time.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    If Mary Shelley disappoints, it’s only because al-Mansour sticks to the tried and true bones of the bio-pic genre and plays it stylistically safe. Maybe the filmmaker hopes to prove her skill with a big-budget period piece; if so, she easily succeeds.
  9. Upgrade, Whannell’s second outing behind the camera, is yet another top-notch repair job, this time a kinetic sci-fi riff fashioned from scrap metal and human entrails, nervily updating Cronenbergian body horror for the iOS era.
  10. Veteran London theater director Dominic Cooke (the BBC’s “The Hollow Crown”) and acclaimed novelist Ian McEwan adapt the fractured-narrative feature from McEwan’s book, enhancing the elegant prose with additional bits of rich characterization and handsomely shot scenery.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film casts Annette Bening as the vain, aging stage actress Irina Arkadina, Saoirse Ronan as the naive country beauty Nina, and Elisabeth Moss as bitter Masha, dressed in black “in mourning for my life.” Those are three excellent reasons to see the movie, and the filmmaking fights them almost every step of the way.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Audiences should feel free to lower their guard — to adjust expectations into B-movie territory. And as a B-movie, “Solo” delivers, sometimes in a way that reminds a viewer of this franchise’s roots in classic Saturday matinee adventure serials and sometimes simply as proficient, dutiful, time-passing entertainment.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 25 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This feeble excuse for a comedy made me angry, and if you have any cherished cinematic feelings for the quartet of actresses at its center, you may feel angry, too.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Pope Francis: A Man of His Word is an essay in radical humility capable of moving a viewer regardless of his or her religious persuasions, or lack thereof.
  11. Holding it all together is his voice-over narration: always intelligent and thoughtful, sometimes wistful, occasionally navel-gazing annoying. Even when annoying, the narration sounds great, thanks to the murmury musicality of Salles’s Portuguese.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Deadpool 2 is very good at what it does, which is flattering the audience into feeling like it’s in on the joke. If you’re a doubter, though, you may wonder if the joke’s on us.
  12. Subpar stuff with a few multiplex-worthy bits: a gonzo opening chase with the US Border Patrol, some wisecracking narration, and grungy location atmosphere. [15 July 2012, p.N10]
    • Boston Globe
  13. Though sometimes it seems like a promotional video, the film offers a glimpse into the vagaries of class, culture, celebrity, and social mores since the hotel was first established back in 1930.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Sadly, it’s not quite as fun as that sounds. If you’re up for something deeply and unsettlingly strange, though, Bruno Dumont’s portrait of the saint as a young zealot has genuine oddball pleasures amid stretches of real tedium.

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