Boston Globe's Scores

For 6,429 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Precious: Based on the Novel 'Push' by Sapphire
Lowest review score: 0 Bratz
Score distribution:
6429 movie reviews
  1. Berg and Wahlberg deliver a relentlessly paced, addictively slick paramilitary thriller actively catering to fans of gonzo brutality and turbocharged machismo.
  2. The stylishly crafted film mostly succeeds in its engaging (and tagline-ready) ambition to chronicle “how mankind discovered man’s best friend,” even if its naturalistic strengths are swapped out for an exaggeratedly epic tone in the later going.
  3. Telling all is not necessarily the same thing as telling the truth, even if Bowers’s memory seems as clear as the glint in his bright blue eyes. Maybe it’s his ego that’s not clear — or too much so.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    A coming-of-age story set on four wheels, has the distinct charm of a film assured of its voice, even as its central character strives to find her own.
  4. Maybe the key is how nicely self-aware the move is. On the soundtrack, for example, we hear both “Material Girl” and “Money (That’s What I Want)” sung in Mandarin. Everything’s so over the top it’s a bit weightless, which in this context is a compliment.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    In its tactful, observant way, the film is unrelenting in assessing the damage that blind faith can wreak on its children and heartening in showing how those damaged find strength in each other.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s Dyrholm’s film, though, and Nicchiarelli’s, and between them the two women do honor to their subject in all her contradictions.
  5. Why can’t the film maintain its subtler shadings throughout? It’s a puzzle.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A ferocious mix of prankishness and cold fury that is one of the director’s strongest yet most entertaining works in years.
  6. Reed follows the proceedings as they happen and builds the suspense of a top-notch courtroom drama.
  7. It’s surprising to see how straight McGregor plays it for director Marc Forster (the J.M. Barrie portrait “Finding Neverland”), allowing the CG-animated Pooh and friends to endearingly steal the show.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Brisk and deeply engrossing.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s essentially “Romy and Michelle’s Mission Impossible” or “Lucy and Ethel Live and Let Die,” and it’s an easy, awfully disposable two hours that scatters some off-kilter belly laughs among a lot of labored gags and efficiently-shot action movie setpieces.
  8. Bonhôte and Ettedgui leave viewers winded from the pace of the ascent. But much the way we know that there was a rise, we also know a fall is imminent. This is where McQueen wobbles.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The best parts are the breezes of real, observed life that breathe through many of the scenes — the street corners, the storefronts, the rough camaraderie of guys hanging out, the wary warmth of women.
  9. As for Drucker and Ménochet, they vividly embody the roles of abuser and victim but have little else to work with.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Not just one of the best but, at its best, an exercise in pure action-movie propulsion and an essay in how to get from Point A to Point B in the most ingenious and exhausting way imaginable.
  10. Save for a couple of crisp standalone segments incorporated as tone-setters, Washington’s first-ever sequel is a narratively and visually muddled disappointment, one that regularly confuses numbing brutality with vicariously thrilling righteous vengeance.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Green Fog is a cinephile’s mash note — and a glimpse of the beautiful film library of Babel that lives in Guy Maddin’s head.
  11. All in all, Beaton could have been a character in an Evelyn Waugh novel — both belonged to the Bright Young Things, in ’20s London — except that he and Waugh detested each other.
  12. “Don’t Worry” is not a conventional biopic. That makes sense — Callahan sure isn’t a conventional biopic subject — but that unconventionality can present problems. Sometimes the movie is sentimental. More often, it’s scabrous. Maybe if the movie didn’t feel overlong (trim and tight it’s not), those qualities might seem better balanced.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    At times, Eighth Grade plays like a nature documentary about life and death on the savannas of suburbia.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    I wish I could tell you that Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again is ridiculous and I hated it, but the fact is that it’s ridiculous and I loved every minute.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    You’ve seen almost all of this before, with more wit and a better villain.
  13. As a general survey of Williams’s life, as a collection of precious backstage outtakes, and as a nostalgic trip back into his comedy stylings, Robin Williams: Come Inside My Mind does the trick. It’s a sad, but satisfying, visit with a special man.
  14. The idea behind Eugene Jarecki’s nonfiction film The King — you can’t really call it a documentary — is crazy-good inspired.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    There are a lot of reasons to be thankful for Sorry to Bother You — one being that it represents the return of the inspired/demented midnight-movie satire — but the rise of Lakeith Stanfield to leading man status is probably the most satisfying.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The final shots are both majestic and damning, and they lift the film with a kind of gentle contempt into a surrealism that makes an awful kind of sense, the world in its lushness swallowing Zama as it will swallow us all. Some movies unfold as dreams; Zama dances us playfully toward the edge of nightmare and then asks us to open our eyes.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    A family affair, a family failure. The life of Whitney Houston seems like a cage match between competing egotists who call one another relatives. No doubt a certain pall hangs over the film, perhaps inevitable with the subject, and aided by the cathartic candor of most interviewees.
  15. It’s fast, it’s funny, it’s superficial, it’s full of likable stars and scientific mumbo-jumbo, and, above all, it taps into the human urge to see big things become little and little things get big. It’s as close to lizard-brain entertainment as superhero blockbusters get, and as the mercury pushes toward 100, I’ll take it.

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