Boston Globe's Scores

For 6,548 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Roma
Lowest review score: 0 All About Steve
Score distribution:
6548 movie reviews
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Cold War is a ravishment, a cinematic feast for the senses, and it packs an epic inner landscape into a dense 88 minutes.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Glass isn’t a terrible film but neither is it a particularly good one, and it certainly doesn’t stick the landing the way the filmmaker and his hardy fans have probably hoped. It’s by turns intriguing, awkward, inspired, misguided, and very, very talky.
  1. An unexpected portrait of the legendary comedy duo on a mostly forgotten stage tour at the twilight of their careers.
  2. What makes The Upside work as well as it often does is how the actors are able to convey the unlikely affinity these unlikely people share.
  3. Neither dense, distracting makeup nor confused, convoluted chronology can disguise the fact that Karyn Kusama’s Destroyer, scripted by Phil Hay and Matt Manfredi, is a mediocre mash-up of genre clichés.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Museo is slightly frustrating on first watch, as its themes lie partly hidden behind Bernal’s intentionally abrasive performance and the mix-and-match filmmaking of Ruizpalacios: Bursts of faux-epic movie music in Tomas Barreiro’s score, camerawork that can be ironically portentous, scenes that flit along the edge of the surreal. The connective tissue is sometimes hard to discern.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Is it horror? Drama? Love story? Allegory? Maybe best to think of it as a chilly Scandinavian bedtime tale, the type to unsettle bothersome children and leave them identifying with the ogre.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Baldwin knew that hope is the engine that takes us to the future, to a changed and better day, and whether that hope is embodied in action, in expression, or in a child is immaterial. If Beale Street Could Talk is a stained-glass window looking out onto what could still be.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This is a story that needs to be told, but McKay turns out to be precisely the wrong man to tell it. By comparison, Oliver Stone is a model of sober restraint.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Watchable, illuminating, and ultimately unmemorable — inspiring without being inspired.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 25 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The tone is almost willfully off-putting. The parts that are supposed to be cute could give you the creeps. The film is almost a Platonic ideal of how to take an emotionally transfixing real-life story and get it wrong.
  4. Aquaman’s first glimpse of Atlantis is meant to convey wonder, but mostly there’s a sense of digitally over-busy déjà vu, as we’re reminded of more inventively designed fantasyscapes in “Thor,” “Avatar” and so on.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Mary Poppins Returns is torn between taking audiences back to their childhoods and treating them like children. You might have a good time but don’t be surprised if you feel a little dociousaliexpeisticfragicalirupus afterward.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Rather than a suspenseful action exercise with volleys of gunfire, The Mule is more of a quixotic character picaresque, a distant relative of the recent Robert Redford farewell, “The Old Man & the Gun,” without being nearly as well written.
  5. Von Trotta comes closest to the object of her search when she looks at images from his movies. Especially images of the seashore.
  6. After a point, we’re left wondering whether we’re watching a character study or caricature. Either way, the portrait gradually morphs from intriguing to tedious.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Any movie on this subject that’s not uncomfortable isn’t really doing its job, and Ben Is Back puts an audience through a wringer of emotional and physical suspense. If you’ve dealt with addiction, personally or in your extended family, the movie should probably come with a trigger warning.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    One of the wittiest and most creatively exuberant movies of the year, and maybe one of the best.
  7. Dava Whisenant’s documentary, Bathtubs Over Broadway, offers a glimpse into a world few are aware of: industrial musicals — Broadway-style productions similar to Broadway shows except that they promote products like bathtub fixtures, surgical supplies, and John Deere tractors. They were performed exclusively for company members, sometimes recorded or filmed, then forgotten.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie is less a movie than a collection of scenes lined up in a row, and the tone wobbles between pomp and circumstantial melodrama.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A brisk and reasonably thorough dog trot through a life that was simultaneously invisible and all powerful, and it’s goosed along with slick production techniques that more than once get in the way.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Like all the best films, Roma is achingly specific while constantly opening up to the universal.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s in theory the worst family movie of 2018 — and in practice one of the year’s best films.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie itself is great fun before it curdles intentionally into nastiness and drift.
  8. Tom Volf’s distinctive and affecting documentary makes plain how much the persona also owed to appearance and intelligence and life history.
  9. For much of its first half, Chef Flynn feels like an after-school special with a difference — a big, big difference.
  10. At its best moments, Creed II manages a feat nearly as striking as anything that Michael B. Jordan’s Rocky Balboa protégé pulls off in the boxing ring: It doesn’t play all that much like a sequel.
  11. The imaginative, touching, and dizzyingly animated Ralph Breaks the Internet is a sequel with a rich, broad vision that addresses all of these issues faster than you can say Fix-It Felix.
  12. Some of the film is slow. Some of it is silly.
  13. Schnabel tries to re-create van Gogh’s inner workings during the intense last two years of his life — his point of view and his way of looking at the world that resulted in the masterpieces that have since become invaluable investment commodities.

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