Boston Globe's Scores

For 6,483 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Back to the Future
Lowest review score: 0 Bratz
Score distribution:
6483 movie reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    As franchise reboots go, the new Halloween is top shelf. Jamie Lee Curtis returns with a vengeance to the role of Laurie Strode.
  1. He (Barinholtz) works hard to creatively lampoon a nation divided, and his first-timer’s ambition and thematic investment are admirable. Disappointingly, though, he lacks storytelling chops, aiming for wildly provocative satire but instead churning out a technically spotty screed.
  2. Everett draws effectively from Wilde’s own writings and witticisms.
  3. A line gets crossed. It isn’t the one between California and Nevada. It’s the one from “Bad” to worse.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    First Man plays a different and arguably more rewarding game, one that looks for the man behind the hero. It’s a movie that shows how the most personal moments can coexist within and alongside the most momentous events. It’s a film that insists history is made from private lives.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Mostly, though, the movie succeeds because of the actress at its center.
  4. Each of these dames of the realm gets to play the choicest of roles: herself.
  5. Go figure that the year’s most outrageously harrowing action movie turns out to be an arthouse doc from National Geographic.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Venom, the movie, is a reptilian Marvel mishmash whose touch saps the life force of almost everyone in it.
  6. Director David Lowery (“Ain’t them Bodies Saints,” “A Ghost Story”) did the adaptation of David Grann’s New Yorker magazine article. His direction is winningly relaxed, and his script has real flavor.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    On the basis of The Sisters Brothers, we’d all be better off handing our westerns to Frenchmen. Especially if the results do right by John C. Reilly. That fine, ursine character actor — our generation’s Wallace Beery, as I live and breathe — is one of the four corners of the movie’s acting pleasures, the other three being Joaquin Phoenix, Jake Gyllenhaal, and Riz Ahmed (HBO’s “The Night Of”).
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A modern comedy-drama in the Woody Allen-Noah Baumbach mold — urban intellectuals talking their lives in circles — but what keeps it from being a live-action New Yorker cartoon is the heart beating away in the script and the performances. At over two hours, it’s long but it’s true.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The latest update, directed by Cooper and built on the sturdy bones of William Wellman’s and Robert Carson’s 1937 script, has heart, soul, and sinew. Above all, it has Lady Gaga, both before and after her character’s transformation from an outer-borough duckling into a superstar swan.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Most refreshingly, Science Fair illustrates the many different kinds of STEM students out there.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Broad as the side of a city bus and about as lumbering, Night School is a better-than-average Kevin Hart comedy — meaning that it’s an average comedy overall. It’s silly and rather sweet, and it’s blessed with an ensemble that makes the most of the dopey cartoon script patched together by Hart and five other writers.
  7. Westmoreland’s narrative is cluttered with undeveloped subplots and loose ends. He compensates by evoking the era with images drawing from painters like Gustave Caillebotte and Toulouse-Lautrec and soundtrack music that ranges from Strauss-like waltzes to Erik Satie’s “Gymnopédies.”
  8. Everyone from Channing Tatum to Danny DeVito to Hollywood transplant LeBron James is here voicing the movie’s winsomely rendered snow creatures, but it’s the creative story more than the routine-if-likable characters that makes this one so engaging.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Hal
    Hal is a soft-edged memorial that should direct you, or re-direct you, to some terrific and tough-edged films.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Fogelman is familiar with the genre, having created the Emmy-nominated “This Is Us,” which has been deft enough in its treatment of loss to make it one of NBC’s most-watched shows. Life Itself fails to elicit the same sniffles, instead drowning its cast in a sticky, soggy script.
  9. Moore shows newsreel footage of Hitler delivering a speech. Only it’s not Hitler’s voice we hear. It’s Trump’s. Get it? Sure you do, and as you do the documentary slips the surly bonds of sanity — even of agitprop — to enter a realm of its own polemical making. Words cannot do justice to such an editorial decision. Well, maybe five can: intellectually null and morally contemptible.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie is Hawke’s fourth and best feature as a director; it’s immensely touching, and only deceptively shapeless.
  10. Tricky territory to navigate, but it ultimately lends some genuine poignancy to the story’s familiar accidental-family themes. If there’s someplace Roth makes a mark, it’s here.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The resulting movie is atmospheric and compelling, and it makes an empathetic case for Borden as an intelligent, passionate woman so stifled by her father and the suffocating society he represented that she lashed out (and then some).
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    With all that good will and with an abundance of source material, why does the documentary Love, Gilda feel like such a disappointment? It’s fine for casual viewers: you’ll come away reasonably satisfied if you want to catch up on the basics of Radner’s life and career while having your nostalgia gently stroked.
  11. The Children Act isn’t all that interesting a movie, despite the many talented people involved and the generally high level of work they do. The most interesting thing about it is how it presents a case study in the very different way style can determine what works on the screen vs. what works on the page.
  12. Kendrick’s interplay with Lively crackles, whether they’re going for laughs or something darker. Both are big selling points — as is their director, even if it’s not as advertised.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    In a way I’ve never before seen done onscreen, Madeline’s Madeline fuses triumph and tragedy until the two feel strong and indistinguishable.
  13. So the big surprise about White Boy Rick is how well the movie works. It’s one thing to know a story is based on nonfiction. Being made to believe its plausibility is something else. White Boy Rick you believe.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    “Pick” often feels like a project that has been overly groomed. Will you still be moved to tears? Most likely.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 25 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Garner bulls her way through the film with determination and a minimum of facial expressions, like someone who’s been told to clean up something awful and just wants to get it over with. So what if Charlize Theron did it better in “Atomic Blonde,” last year’s female-led brawler that is in every conceivable way superior to Peppermint?

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