Austin Chronicle's Scores

For 6,283 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 The Fighter
Lowest review score: 0 Taxi
Score distribution:
6283 movie reviews
    • 29 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Considering that the whole point of the Slender Man mythos is that it is so adaptable and mutable, to pour it into the most generic of formats is just lazy. Compared to the thematically linked and superior "The Mothman Prophecies" (where Richard Gere chases a pre-digital urban myth), it's the most generic choice imaginable, and stinks of focus group thinking.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    There’s an earnestness amid the well-executed jump scares and gruesome pay-off, an honesty that can sometimes be in short supply in teen-centric horror.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    The film is funnier than it has every right to be, given the boilerplate premise of dogs bringing people together, but Marino and co. go for the brass ring.
  1. The Meg is simply mediocre, PG-13 monster-moviemaking at its mind-numbing kinda/sorta best-ish. Meh.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    Does the man make the uniform, or does the uniform make the man? Schwentke's conclusion is as dark as you may fear.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    For all its amazing high points (and this satirically minded takedown of the ludicrousness of the American racist right has many of those) BlacKkKlansman also shows Lee at his weakest. The slight running time drags, a sensation not helped by Terence Blanchard's underwhelming score.
  2. Never Goin’ Back and its overworked tropes should, by all rights, be a trifle of a film, but what Frizzell and her two leads deliver is more fun than a floating party boat.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    True, Christopher Robin may take a little time to get to those emotions, mainly due to a scene-setting introduction that could stretch the attention of the most wriggly children. But once Pooh and Christopher are once more paw-in-hand, it's just enchanting.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    A peerless fusing of dumbshow performance and background sound editing, there's a rising panic that allows the final, violent closing act to seem shockingly organic.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    In another universe, the juxtaposition of family and tragedy might’ve produced something unique; instead, it feels like a pastiche of borrowed story beats from better movies.
  3. Kunis and McKinnon don’t exactly set the screen on fire with their chemistry, and there are only the most perfunctory shadings to their characters.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    It’s not entirely clear what “generation” is the guilty one being examined in filmmaker Lauren Greenfield’s third full-length documentary, but it’s safe to say that we are now several decades into the decline of Western civilization (that Creem critic was right, you guys).
    • 1 Metascore
    • 11 Critic Score
    This is filmmaking as polemic, and much in the same way as Michael Moore’s (much better) films have a particular agenda to puzzle out various ways in which our country has failed us, this traffics in the same vein.
  4. The film’s basic problem is that it jumps around too much, with an array of speakers from Montana to Washington, D.C. to California.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Funny, vibrant, insightful, tragic, achingly timely, and yet with an underlying message about empathy that is timeless, Blindspotting may be the summer's most essential movie.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    A relentlessly entertaining exercise in putting Cruise’s Ethan Hunt through his paces again. And again. And again. But hey, there’s much pleasure in watching him continually fall off things.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Packed with an equal amount of fart gags and jokes about the modern state of superhero films, Teen Titans is a perfect bit of escapism for families suffering from superhero fatigue.
  5. Parker has cast credible young versions of all the original players, although in most cases vintage outperforms new grape.
  6. Burnham’s sociological precision as a screenwriter and director, however, would likely not feel as genuine if not for Fisher in the pivotal role of Kayla. She doesn’t act the part as much as she breathes it. It may be the most honest performance you’ll see in a movie this year.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    As he proves again, few directors have Jarecki's skill for pulling a massive stack of disparate themes – race, celebrity, power, wealth, drug addiction, poverty, militarism – into one coherent narrative.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s all mighty existential and interesting, yet the introduction of this heady topic acts as prelude to a rather bizarre, if dark, comedic situation. The timing, like everything in this movie, is a little off-kilter.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Yet it's really Phoenix that binds the whole piece together. In him, Callahan is self-piteous and sardonic, wildly inappropriate and desperate to please.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Now, four years later, Blumhouse Productions has released an anthology sequel that follows in its footsteps. The kicker? It’s even better than the first.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The Equalizer 2 tries way too hard to play the action sequences straight.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    What Zierra is really exploring is the fine line between maverick genius and manipulative bully. The cult of Kubrick is such that no one still dare broach the idea that what he did to his actors, to his crew, and especially to Vitali, was cruel.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Boundaries would be a lot more charming if it was anything remotely an organic story instead of being glued to a template.
  7. Although the dramatic scale of Leave No Trace is small as well, that trait should not be mistaken for insignificance. This film raises more questions than it answers, which can prove a turnoff to some viewers, but others will soak in its ambiguities long after the closing credits.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    In the end, it’s hard to rule out any Johnson movie entirely, but Skyscraper is more disappointment than summer sleeper.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    No offense to composer Mark Mothersbaugh (who is heavily involved in all three films) but the soundtrack is better this time around, thanks to some heavy, entrancing, villainous beats by DJ Tiësto.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Riley’s film is a welcome hand grenade of subversive power that often reminded me of another incendiary film, Terry Gilliam’s classic "Brazil."

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