A Total War Saga: Thrones of Britannia Image
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75

Generally favorable reviews - based on 51 Critics What's this?

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5.3

Mixed or average reviews- based on 110 Ratings

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  • Summary: From the multi-award-winning strategy series, A Total War Saga: Thrones of Britannia combines huge real-time battles with engrossing turn-based campaign, set at a critical flashpoint in history. Anglo-Saxons, Gaelic clans and Viking settlers clash for control. What Kingdom will you build?

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A Total War Saga: Thrones of Britannia - Blood, Sweat And Spears Trailer
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 29 out of 51
  2. Negative: 0 out of 51
  1. May 7, 2018
    90
    Anglo-Saxons, Gaelic clans and Viking settlers battle for Brittania and the glory of forging a great empire. A change from the usual Total War games but a potential gateway to newcomers.
  2. Apr 30, 2018
    82
    I am almost completely satisfied with the new and revised functions of the strategy card - and spend most of the game here.
  3. May 3, 2018
    80
    An interesting start to the new sub-series that will serve as a good way to pass the time until the next "big" Total War.
  4. May 14, 2018
    75
    Total War Saga: Thrones of Britannia is a more streamlined, sleeker and quicker Total War than those before it. However, the changes to make it like this offer new opportunities and one of the more tactical campaign maps than ever before. While it still suffers from some issues, like boring end game and being altogether too easy, there's still a whole lot to gain from playing Thrones of Britannia.
  5. Apr 30, 2018
    73
    A brilliant early game and bold experiments almost make up for the AI niggles and the boring march to the final battle.
  6. May 24, 2018
    70
    While the sameness of the factions began to bother me after a time, and will keep me from revisiting this one as much as I have the previous games, Thrones of Britannia does a fine job of shaking things up a bit. Not every change was welcome, but certain things, like army recruitment and siege battles, clearly came out better because of it. While my eyes are firmly set on the DLC releases to TW:W2, which are coming out at a steady pace, I did enjoy this diversion to the British Isles, and look forward to more Sagas when Creative Assembly wants to shake the tree up a bit.
  7. May 3, 2018
    50
    If Total War wants to be able to compete again, it needs to not only take inspiration from its greatest competitors, but seriously needs to look back to its own glory days: Rome and Medieval II.

See all 54 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 12 out of 33
  2. Negative: 14 out of 33
  1. May 3, 2018
    10
    As a guy with 386 hours on attila i can easily say that everyone saying "this is an attila rip off" is wrong

    There's so many new mechanics
    As a guy with 386 hours on attila i can easily say that everyone saying "this is an attila rip off" is wrong

    There's so many new mechanics and old mechanics brought back from the old games. The new village system is great, the new recruitment system reminds me of the good old days of medieval 2. The battles are rather similar to attila, but that's also the only similarity between the 2 games

    over all, a great new adition to the series
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  2. May 3, 2018
    9
    A solid entry into the series and one that introduces some very welcome features, particularly considering it's a saga title and not aA solid entry into the series and one that introduces some very welcome features, particularly considering it's a saga title and not a mainline entry. To start with, positives in no particular order:

    - The campaign map is absolutely gorgeous. It's huge and detailed.
    - The new recruitment mechanics make armies a lot more interesting. No elites on demand, you actually have to think through what units you're going to recruit and when, as they take several turns to fully muster. Elite and retinue units actually feel valuable now.
    - The soundtrack is really immersive
    - The period appropriate art style works really well. The main menu background is beautiful
    - The siege battle maps are some of the best I've seen in any Total War game
    - No stupid AI refusing trade agreements. These are now automatic if you're at peace and have a connection between your capitals. Very welcome.
    - New province system is an interesting design choice. The lack of garrisons in minor settlements requires you think a bit more strategically about where you build up and where you station your armies. This can only be a good thing.
    - No agents! I always found these a chore in previous titles so glad to see them gone.
    - I like the added emphasis on generals/governors and 'followers' (basically a skill tree). A general's bodyguard unit size will increase with his command skill which is a really nice touch.
    - Narrative events are a welcome addition

    Negatives/Less good things

    - No ambush battles
    - No forced march. I don't really mind, but it is missing
    - No building trees. All buildings are linear upgrades. I like choice.
    - AI has good moments but it also has bad moments. Same as any Total War game
    - Some clipping issues occasionally and collision isn't always particularly satisfying. Sometimes it works really well though.

    All in all a really refreshing experience.

    Besides, it's £30, compared to the £150 I've spent on the Warhammer Total War titles. Yet I fully expect to get as many hours out of this. Highly recommended.
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  3. May 5, 2018
    8
    I've played most of the Total War games and this one is a worthy addition to the series. It took a bit of getting used to after the truly epicI've played most of the Total War games and this one is a worthy addition to the series. It took a bit of getting used to after the truly epic scale of the Warhammer ones and Empire (I'm a sucker for 18th Century history and have played that one to absolute death), but once you get the hang of it there's a surprising amount of depth that comes with the scale. There are various vital mechanics regarding your generals that would be way too micro-managey in a larger scale game.

    Historically, the game is a pretty good depiction of late 9th century Britain, with the various factions occupying the right places and feeling as they should as you play them. There is a Welsh faction in Scotland, which seems a bit weird, but I guess that's a nod to the linguistically different Celts (the Brythonic speakers rather than the later-arriving Gaelic speakers).

    One thing that I've had issue with in a lot of Total War games is that the battles can get a bit formulaic. In Empire, for example, your formations are usually the same (musket in the middle, artillery on the flanks and cavalry on you far flanks) with little scope for variety, which means your battles play out more or less the same each time. I had similar issues with Medieval 2 and the Romes, but maybe that's just how I played them out.

    With Thrones of Britannia, there are nine standard deployments you can use and customise from, and so far I've found a very distinct use for each one depending on terrain, numbers and the type of opposing army. Similarly, there seems to be quite a lot of tactical variety in how you can play your battles out, and the timing and targets of your charges and counter-charges can win or lose a battle.

    It is a very big departure from the epic, OTT battles and strategies of the Warhammer games, and there seems to be a lot more nuance in the way that Thrones plays out. I can see how that would throw a lot of players, especially when you have to consider the loyalty and influence of your generals as well as the usual happiness in your provinces. Managing these elements are probably more important in the strategic layer than getting your production and technology chains built.

    I've also read a lot of complaints about missing mechanics, but the mechanics that are there (including the new ones) are there to reflect the social and military orders of the time. 9th century society wasn't anything like as organised as the Roman or feudal periods, and this becomes a natural part of the way the game plays.

    As a game set in a relatively small area with varied factional goals, cultures and internal intrigues, Thrones of Britannia works and plays well. In terms of pure gameplay it's not the best Total War game to date (say what you like but I have to give that to the Mortal Empires campaign in Warhammer 2), but as a serious historical game set in an interesting period, it's definitely up there - especially if you're bit of a history nerd.
    Expand
  4. May 10, 2018
    5
    I hate it that comparing to Total War Shogun, this game is WAY TOO SIMPLIFIED. There is almost no plot, no videos showing consequences of yourI hate it that comparing to Total War Shogun, this game is WAY TOO SIMPLIFIED. There is almost no plot, no videos showing consequences of your choices, the number of units is too low and after playing for 10 hours I haven't fought A SINGLE BATTLE in a castle - NOT EVEN ONE! I don't even know if it has been "cut out" from the series.
    Sure, they changed some of the things for better, like there are no more annoying pop-up notifications that your general has been promoted - they have been consolidated into one small window at the top of the screen, but when it comes to campaign map, framerate still drops to 5FPS, after ending a round and it still takes forever for the AI to make its moves.
    Now, add some other things other players wrote about and you will know NOT TO buy this.. half of the game. Low price of this product should give you a hint, that this is not a full Total War game as they used to make them before.
    I would pay twice as much if they made Napoleon remake.
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  5. May 10, 2018
    4
    You can call it "Attila Total War re-skinned" it's almost the same game with the same gtaphic engine nothing really new also has the worseYou can call it "Attila Total War re-skinned" it's almost the same game with the same gtaphic engine nothing really new also has the worse clunky animations from all Total War games this is probably the most boring game of the series with the most uninteresting factions and with a horrible stupid enemy AI. The game is a scam for me it feels like a bad DLC made for Attila Total War. I am going back to play Warhammer 2 TW it's a much better game Expand
  6. May 3, 2018
    2
    This is the worst TW game released EVER. Could this be the fall of CA? Or maybe it is time for CA to wake up and start making changes? It isThis is the worst TW game released EVER. Could this be the fall of CA? Or maybe it is time for CA to wake up and start making changes? It is cheap, it is bland, it is just BAD. Trust me, I played every TW game starting from Shogun 1. Expand
  7. May 10, 2018
    0
    The worst game in the series, which in fact is an addition to Attila, to simplify everything to impossibility, all factions are the same,The worst game in the series, which in fact is an addition to Attila, to simplify everything to impossibility, all factions are the same, removed the destruction of settlements, removed agents, removed the march mode. The worst game in the series. Dumb artificial intelligence is also attached to the aggravated schedule. Expand

See all 33 User Reviews