For 2,380 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ty Burr's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Man on Wire
Lowest review score: 0 Bratz
Score distribution:
2380 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    In its tactful, observant way, the film is unrelenting in assessing the damage that blind faith can wreak on its children and heartening in showing how those damaged find strength in each other.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    It’s Dyrholm’s film, though, and Nicchiarelli’s, and between them the two women do honor to their subject in all her contradictions.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    A ferocious mix of prankishness and cold fury that is one of the director’s strongest yet most entertaining works in years.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    Brisk and deeply engrossing.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Ty Burr
    It’s essentially “Romy and Michelle’s Mission Impossible” or “Lucy and Ethel Live and Let Die,” and it’s an easy, awfully disposable two hours that scatters some off-kilter belly laughs among a lot of labored gags and efficiently-shot action movie setpieces.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    The best parts are the breezes of real, observed life that breathe through many of the scenes — the street corners, the storefronts, the rough camaraderie of guys hanging out, the wary warmth of women.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    Not just one of the best but, at its best, an exercise in pure action-movie propulsion and an essay in how to get from Point A to Point B in the most ingenious and exhausting way imaginable.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    The Green Fog is a cinephile’s mash note — and a glimpse of the beautiful film library of Babel that lives in Guy Maddin’s head.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    At times, Eighth Grade plays like a nature documentary about life and death on the savannas of suburbia.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    I wish I could tell you that Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again is ridiculous and I hated it, but the fact is that it’s ridiculous and I loved every minute.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Ty Burr
    You’ve seen almost all of this before, with more wit and a better villain.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    There are a lot of reasons to be thankful for Sorry to Bother You — one being that it represents the return of the inspired/demented midnight-movie satire — but the rise of Lakeith Stanfield to leading man status is probably the most satisfying.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    The final shots are both majestic and damning, and they lift the film with a kind of gentle contempt into a surrealism that makes an awful kind of sense, the world in its lushness swallowing Zama as it will swallow us all. Some movies unfold as dreams; Zama dances us playfully toward the edge of nightmare and then asks us to open our eyes.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    One of the more entertaining yet profoundly disturbing documentaries of this or any year.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Ty Burr
    Damsel, goofy, absurdist, and subversive, feels like a brave step in an uncertain direction.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Ty Burr
    How do you make a boring movie about this guy? Beats me, but director Ben Lewin has managed to pull it off. Based on Nicholas Dawidoff’s 1994 biography of the same title, The Catcher Was a Spy is a decorous, dutiful dogtrot that tells Berg’s story with excellent production values and a conspicuous lack of energy. In its tastefully dull fashion it wastes not only a fascinating subject but the mercurial actor playing him.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Ty Burr
    You can go see Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom or you can save yourself the time and money by chugging a six-pack of Red Bull and running through the dinosaur exhibits at the Harvard Museum of Natural History until you can’t breathe. As experiences go, they’re equally adrenalizing and equally ephemeral.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    It’s unnerving in ways that elude easy explanation and that slip under your skin and stay there.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Ty Burr
    Hearts Beat Loud is gentle, funny, humane, and predictable, kept from becoming tiresome by a cast of pros that includes not only Offerman but Toni Collette as Frank’s landlady and possible love interest and a frisky Ted Danson as a philosophic stoner who owns the neighborhood watering hole.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    Nancy is an eccentric, pungent gift of a film about a woman without identity played by an actress without persona.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Ty Burr
    The result is a clattery, unfocused affair that at times is more irritating than fun.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    High-concept, low-budget, proudly set-bound, Hotel Artemis shouldn’t work at all. Somehow, miraculously, it does.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    It’s an eerie mood piece that slowly and surely tightens the thumb screws before all hell breaks loose; that and the fact that much of Hereditary takes place in one rambling dark house is evidence that Aster has spent a lot of time studying “The Shining,” “The Exorcist,” and “Rosemary’s Baby.” It’s nice to have a classicist back in town.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Ty Burr
    We go to heist films to see the suckers get taken in high style. This one just robs us bland.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Ty Burr
    Throw out any expectations you might have of coherent narrative structure or directorial control, and you might have a pretty good time.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    If Mary Shelley disappoints, it’s only because al-Mansour sticks to the tried and true bones of the bio-pic genre and plays it stylistically safe. Maybe the filmmaker hopes to prove her skill with a big-budget period piece; if so, she easily succeeds.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Ty Burr
    The film casts Annette Bening as the vain, aging stage actress Irina Arkadina, Saoirse Ronan as the naive country beauty Nina, and Elisabeth Moss as bitter Masha, dressed in black “in mourning for my life.” Those are three excellent reasons to see the movie, and the filmmaking fights them almost every step of the way.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Ty Burr
    Audiences should feel free to lower their guard — to adjust expectations into B-movie territory. And as a B-movie, “Solo” delivers, sometimes in a way that reminds a viewer of this franchise’s roots in classic Saturday matinee adventure serials and sometimes simply as proficient, dutiful, time-passing entertainment.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 25 Ty Burr
    This feeble excuse for a comedy made me angry, and if you have any cherished cinematic feelings for the quartet of actresses at its center, you may feel angry, too.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    Pope Francis: A Man of His Word is an essay in radical humility capable of moving a viewer regardless of his or her religious persuasions, or lack thereof.

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