For 317 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Tom Russo's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 88 Ant-Man and the Wasp
Lowest review score: 25 Adore
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 50 out of 317
317 movie reviews
    • 40 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Russo
    Berg and Wahlberg deliver a relentlessly paced, addictively slick paramilitary thriller actively catering to fans of gonzo brutality and turbocharged machismo.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Russo
    The stylishly crafted film mostly succeeds in its engaging (and tagline-ready) ambition to chronicle “how mankind discovered man’s best friend,” even if its naturalistic strengths are swapped out for an exaggeratedly epic tone in the later going.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Russo
    Why can’t the film maintain its subtler shadings throughout? It’s a puzzle.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Russo
    It’s surprising to see how straight McGregor plays it for director Marc Forster (the J.M. Barrie portrait “Finding Neverland”), allowing the CG-animated Pooh and friends to endearingly steal the show.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    Save for a couple of crisp standalone segments incorporated as tone-setters, Washington’s first-ever sequel is a narratively and visually muddled disappointment, one that regularly confuses numbing brutality with vicariously thrilling righteous vengeance.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Tom Russo
    It’s fast, it’s funny, it’s superficial, it’s full of likable stars and scientific mumbo-jumbo, and, above all, it taps into the human urge to see big things become little and little things get big. It’s as close to lizard-brain entertainment as superhero blockbusters get, and as the mercury pushes toward 100, I’ll take it.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    Character quirks know no limits in the indie dramedy Boundaries, a multi-generational road-trip movie that gives both Vera Farmiga and Christopher Plummer richly drawn roles to play.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Russo
    Hawke delivers a strong melancholy variation on his familiar emotional cool as Reverend Toller.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Russo
    Tag
    What’s most unexpectedly gratifying is how much energy veteran standup director Jeff Tomsic and his splashy cast pour into ensuring that this is legit entertainment, packed with gonzo wit and even some sentiment.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Russo
    The drama palpably, potently conveys the group’s misgivings, their jangling nerves, the foolhardy resignation pushing them on despite themselves.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    As he did with his "Everest" cast, Kormákur draws a strong, pathos-rich performance from Woodley, filled with moments of her character confronting her own mortality and looking back on safe choices not made. It’s solid drama, but also very slow going.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Russo
    Veteran London theater director Dominic Cooke (the BBC’s “The Hollow Crown”) and acclaimed novelist Ian McEwan adapt the fractured-narrative feature from McEwan’s book, enhancing the elegant prose with additional bits of rich characterization and handsomely shot scenery.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    Thoroughly vanilla comedy, a movie jammed with well-meaning girl power messages but surprisingly little edge.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Russo
    Keener’s performance keeps the film grounded even as blunt scenes of the opposing camp’s machinations flirt with soap opera villainy.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Russo
    The pervasive, absorbing bitterness and hurt falter only when the story eases off its characters’ cynical insistence that people don’t change. Sudeikis knows how to play jarringly nasty — see “Colossal,” for one — but choked-up can be a reach here.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Russo
    The engaging dynamic between our hero and his gargantuan, computer-generated pal is the movie’s best surprise, with silly and straight bits both working mostly as intended for director Brad Peyton (Johnson’s “Journey 2” and “San Andreas”).
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Russo
    As nifty as any of it is a witty, touching story thread about Adlon’s trepidatious geek wrestling with her sexual orientation even as she wrestles with peer pressure to hop into bed. And guess what? She and the movie make the smart call.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    Tucci can be so focused on Giacometti’s artistic process that he gives short shrift to the art itself.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    Still, not to put too fine — or juvenile — a point on it, a bigger problem is that there’s nothing but ’bot-on-’bot mayhem until the climax, when familiar ugly heads are reared over Tokyo.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    The film is quite the showcase for Zoey Deutch (“Before I Fall”), giving her loose-scripted freedom to play brazen, breezy, even soulfully vulnerable. Still, her selectively promiscuous hellion is so off-putting so much of the time — as are most of those around her, and their lurid plots and predicaments — it’s hard to see the point of it all.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    A serviceable thriller that might have been something more.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Russo
    A story steeped in emotional remoteness manages to command our attention in Thoroughbreds, first-time filmmaker Cory Finley’s darkly satirical portrait of the young and disconnected in old-money Connecticut.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Russo
    A hard-R espionage thriller heavy on themes of sexual degradation and graphic, sometimes sadistic violence.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Russo
    The film can be naggingly vague and patchily written where precision seems called for, but the familiar procession keenly digging into the wistful material does hold interest.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    For all the energy that Rachel McAdams, Jason Bateman, and their castmates pour into their gimmicky comedy, there’s too often a feeling that they’re straining to pump up flat material.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Tom Russo
    If the freneticism gets repetitious, the target audience won’t mind, at least not judging by a preview crowd’s delirious reaction to a recurring electrified-doorknob gag.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Tom Russo
    Where we hoped for a narrative rebound, we get instead another pedestrian, overlong post-apocalyptic entry that fails to capitalize on some decent character dynamics.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Russo
    Danish photojournalist-turned-director Nicolai Fuglsig channels his experience into a credibly stark snapshot of war, one that helps audiences further grasp why the region has been so hellishly problematic for American troops.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Russo
    Neeson’s financially strapped character might vent even more convincingly if he didn’t somehow still have a BMW parked back at the depot, but we’re on board with him all the same.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Tom Russo
    The numbers just aren’t as dynamic as we might have hoped for from director Trish Sie, whose credits include alt-rock act OK Go’s “treadmill video” and other addictively innovative shorts.

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