For 398 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Tim Grierson's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 (T)error
Lowest review score: 10 The Emoji Movie
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 23 out of 398
398 movie reviews
    • 50 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Grierson
    Appropriately for a group known for its theatrical, crowd-pleasing tunes, this authorised-by-the-band biopic carries itself lightly, serving up familiar plot points with panache and a sense of humour, while at the same time investing in the story’s emotional through-line, building to a genuinely moving climax.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Tim Grierson
    This sequel can’t compare to John Carpenter’s ingenious 1978 original, but director David Gordon Green delivers a crowd-pleasing chiller that doubles as an existential commentary on horror itself, both on the screen and in our lives.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Tim Grierson
    A Faithful Man seems to be content playfully ruminating on how matters of the heart consume people — and how, sometimes, pursuing someone can be more fulfilling than actually possessing them.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 76 Tim Grierson
    For every nice small observation and delicately detailed bit of emotional truth, A Star Is Born is, in a larger sense, trapped by its own construction. Yes, it can be quite moving—but it’s moving precisely how you might imagine it would be.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Tim Grierson
    Like his hungry symbiote latching onto Eddie, Fleischer cunningly fastens a malicious irreverence onto an otherwise lacklustre superhero movie. But the symbiosis doesn’t quite take.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Tim Grierson
    There’s ample amusement in the twists, betrayals and revelations that unspool. But Bad Times never really transcends the inherent limitations of its setup; it’s fun, but fleeting.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 Tim Grierson
    It may take a while to acclimate to the film’s off-kilter rhythms and strange happenings — not unlike the film’s protagonist, an outsider entering the forbidding Alaskan wilderness — but Saulnier has crafted his most mature effort to date, mixing his love for pulp fiction with a sombre examination of the inexplicable evil all around us.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Tim Grierson
    As much as her camera patiently and sensitively observes Gabriel and Maya, they still feel a bit distant, their unspoken hopes and fears just out of reach — for us and perhaps for them, too.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Tim Grierson
    Green Book is a thoroughly predictable and conventional true-life drama, but at least Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali make for decent company along the road.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Tim Grierson
    Lipovsky and Stein’s first feature as collaborators exudes a grungy, second-hand feel, and the movie doesn’t have the confidence or vision to breathe new life into its narrative clichés. Instead, the pair lean on the sincerity of their storytelling, crafting a paean to broken families and exploring how children process unspeakable loss.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Grierson
    Filmmaker Tim Sutton elicits pitiless performances from Frank Grillo and Jamie Bell playing two very different criminals on a collision course, and the film exudes a grungy, B-movie ethos in keeping with its scrappy, resourceful characters.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Grierson
    Redford has rarely been this commanding in his recent work, playing Tucker with a mischievousness in his eyes but also so much soul that his thieving feels more like an expression of some sad longing than a chronic criminal mind-set.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Tim Grierson
    A Simple Favor wants it both ways, hoping to be a stylish, twisty, trashy thriller while simultaneously acting superior to the genre’s slinky pleasures. Those conflicting strategies do the film no favours.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Grierson
    If Beale Street isn’t quite as seamless as the Oscar-winning Moonlight, this adaptation of the James Baldwin novel still proves to be a stirring, absorbing experience that articulates something ineffable about everyday life.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Tim Grierson
    Buried in makeup that accentuates her character’s hard-luck existence, Nicole Kidman brings such compelling conviction to her role as a tormented detective that she single handedly imbues the film with urgency and authenticity. That proves crucial, since director Karyn Kusama often miscalculates Destroyer’s sense of its own profundity.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Tim Grierson
    Several emotionally attuned performances help paper over Boy Erased’s storytelling weaknesses.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Grierson
    Director Marielle Heller is less interested in the machinations of Israel’s scheme as she is the psychology behind it, giving us a touchingly understated portrait of self-loathing and loneliness.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Tim Grierson
    As is often the case with Moore’s impassioned documentaries, 11/9 frustrates as much as it rouses, bouncing from topic to topic without fully digging into any of them. As such, it’s a highlight reel of grievances against government, corporations and the status quo that preaches to the choir.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Tim Grierson
    Tongue firmly in cheek and sporting a taste for blood, The Predator has some nasty down-and-dirty pleasures, but director Shane Black can’t entirely reconcile his lightly self-mocking tone with the film’s muscular B-movie action.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Grierson
    The new film from ’71 director Yann Demange is best when it pauses to explore the father-and-son drama at the heart of this tale, as well as coldly examining America’s ruinous drug policy.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Tim Grierson
    Singer-songwriter Ben Dickey is affecting as Foley, assisted ably by a supporting cast that fights to transcend the drunken-angel clichés of the man’s legacy.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Tim Grierson
    As with his United 93 and Captain Phillips, filmmaker Paul Greengrass has taken a horrifying true story and brought sober perspective to it — in the case of 22 July, suggesting that a community’s response to terror can be as critical to a democracy as the attacks themselves.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Grierson
    This is a Western which is rugged and raw, eschewing the genre’s mythmaking for something a little more off the beaten path.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Tim Grierson
    Suffice to say, Suspiria tries to do much, culminating in a finale that’s almost laughably over-the-top. But the passion of Guadagnino’s messy vision — the swirl of emotions he conjures on this grand canvas — has a forcefulness that mostly transcends its sizable flaws.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Tim Grierson
    Ballad doesn’t reinvent the Coens’ sardonic, measured aesthetic, but the anthology’s looser structure allows them a friskiness that is welcome from such masterful veterans.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Tim Grierson
    Kin
    Kin never feels like more than uninspired borrowings from other, better genre films; it’s a story about family without any heart.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Tim Grierson
    The documentary’s so simple it feels profound without ever really trying.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 40 Tim Grierson
    While the actors and puppeteers are committed to The Happytime Murders’ surreal reality, they almost do too good a job: This world’s authenticity is so complete that you’re left mostly slogging through how inanimate most everything else about the movie is.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Tim Grierson
    The adrenaline never stops pumping in Mile 22, a superficially kinetic thriller that simultaneously attempts to be politically savvy and an ultra-macho shoot-‘em-up. That juggling act proves too sophisticated for director Peter Berg who, in his fourth collaboration with Mark Wahlberg, again demonstrates his sufficient skill at crafting dynamic suspense sequences.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 55 Tim Grierson
    More giggle-inducing than terrifying, The Meg throws enough incidents at you that it simulates the feeling of being entertaining.

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