Stephanie Zacharek

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For 1,816 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Stephanie Zacharek's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 The Immigrant
Lowest review score: 0 Miss March
Score distribution:
1816 movie reviews
    • 41 Metascore
    • 30 Stephanie Zacharek
    The mythology he tries to build in Glass is rushed and sloppy; the surprise twist at the end is really just more of a damp wrinkle. Shyamalan believes so strongly in the dramatic impact of this trilogy that he almost makes you believe in it too — that’s his secret superpower. But the illusion is fragile. You don’t need a sixth sense to know you’re in for a letdown. The five you’ve got should be plenty.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    Neither great nor terrible. It quavers in that middle ground of pictures you think you might watch on a plane someday, and you could make a worse choice.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    In its best moments, Aquaman is transportive. There are worse ways to spend a Saturday afternoon.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    Some of the numbers are dazzling, some are exhausting, and many are a mix of both—and still, somehow they work.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 30 Stephanie Zacharek
    McKay’s style here is the equivalent of a knowing cackle; the whole enterprise, elaborate as it is, comes off as lacking in passion. The Big Short had an exhilarating kick, but it also left you feeling queasy over the destructive misdeeds you’d just witnessed. Vice just leaves you feeling sapped, advertising its cleverness without actually being clever.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Stephanie Zacharek
    This well-intentioned movie is a somewhat flawed one: its pace is a little slack, and sometimes it feels too predictably prepackaged. But Jones and Hammer keep the picture moving even through its shakier phases.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    Both Mary Queen of Scots and "The Favourite," as entertaining as they are, end in a place closer to despair than to triumph – not necessarily because the Queens in question rendered poor judgment, but because, in their treacherous worlds, it became impossible to know whom to trust. And, to put it bluntly, men didn’t help.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    The movie is so assertively about the social issue at its heart – the way opioid addiction tears families apart – that it barely leaves room for its characters to breathe. At times it feels more as if they’re spokespeople with jobs to do. That takes its toll on both lead actors, especially Roberts: one minute she’s Denial Mom, the next she’s Tough Love Mom.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    Everybody Knows—which is billed as a psychological thriller, though it’s really more of a family melodrama—feels meandering and indistinct.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Stephanie Zacharek
    There’s some comfort to be found in the predictability of its beats. But only at the end does it muster any real vitality. Any ribs it breaks along the way have healed seamlessly before you’ve even left the theater.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Stephanie Zacharek
    A thriller for modern women who identify more with the messiness of human lives than with flattened slogans about how great women, as a monolithic group, are.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    Schnabel’s dream portrait of van Gogh is made whole by its star, Willem Dafoe, whose radiant intensity fills every corner of the film.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    Astute and painfully relevant political comedy.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Stephanie Zacharek
    In strict filmmaking terms, Bohemian Rhapsody is a bit of a mess. Some of its scenes connect awkwardly, and it hits every beat of disaster and triumph squarely, like a gong. Yet if it has many of the problems we associate with “bad” movies, it has more ragged energy than so many good ones, largely because of Rami Malek’s performance as Mercury, all glitter and muscle and nerve endings.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    Even though Boy Erased is well acted and thoughtful, there’s something vaguely disappointing about it.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Stephanie Zacharek
    Neither the most super-awesome Marvel movie nor the worst. It exists in that micro-millimeter’s breadth of in-between. Venom has energy, style and Tom Hardy — all good things. But it doesn’t really make sense, a bad thing.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    It’s so gripping to watch — as well as being, in places, just delightfully funny — that you never feel you’re being preached to.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Stephanie Zacharek
    A movie featuring Kevin Hart is going to be a Kevin Hart movie: at this point, his personality is too big to fold up; his jackrabbit energy dominates. That doesn’t leave much oxygen for Haddish, whose loopy, billowing spirit needs lots of airspace. And still, somehow, she’s the movie’s guiding presence.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 0 Stephanie Zacharek
    What hurts the most is the wholehearted dedication each of these actors brings to such truly horrendous material: they make Life Itself almost watchable – almost –but there’s no effective cure for this kidney stone of a movie. Please, please, just let it pass.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    We all make mistakes, and we all have the ability to wound when we’re just trying to be clever: Holofcener makes allowances for all of that. But she always favors warmth over sarcasm. And as if she could read our minds, she puts in her characters’ mouths words that we ourselves have sometimes failed to find the guts to say.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    In its best moments, Sierra Burgess, directed by Ian Samuels and written by Lindsey Beer, has the charm of a Shakespearean mistaken-identity gambol.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Stephanie Zacharek
    This new Suspiria is bland, grisly, boring and silly. There is nothing poetic or erotic about it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    It’s effective in a somber way, and as shot by cinematographer Bruno Delbonnel, it’s dazzling to look at, a reinvention of classic literature of the old west with a storybook feel.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Stephanie Zacharek
    It’s wonderful to see a first-time filmmaker who’s more interested in effective storytelling than in impressing us; telling a story effectively is hard enough. Best of all, Cooper has succeeded in making a terrific melodrama for the modern age.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Stephanie Zacharek
    The Favourite is a wicked delight, a fantastic little cupcake of a movie laced with thistle frosting.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Stephanie Zacharek
    This glorious, tender picture, a memoir written in film language, is only indirectly about the man who made it. He stands off to the side, in the shadows, beckoning us toward something. Roma is filmmaking as gesture, an invitation to generosity that we perhaps didn’t know we could feel.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Stephanie Zacharek
    This is a respectful movie, even a genuflecting one; there’s never a moment when Chazelle fails to let you know he’s doing important, valuable work. But that’s the problem: The movie feels too fussed-over for such a low-key hero.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Stephanie Zacharek
    The two leads, Wu and Golding, are charming and genuine, and the supporting performers around them keep the whole mad story spinning—this thing is never boring.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    It’s simply a movie that makes you feel welcome.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Stephanie Zacharek
    Statham is the real thing, and he’s key to the effectiveness of this good-natured and often highly ridiculous adaptation of Steve Alten’s 1997 sci-fi potboiler.

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