Sheila O'Malley

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For 272 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 69% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 29% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Sheila O'Malley's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Elle
Lowest review score: 12 In Stereo
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 42 out of 272
272 movie reviews
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Sheila O'Malley
    Writer-director Sebastian Gutierrez is the latest to tackle the rich implications of Bluebeard in his film Elizabeth Harvest, bringing a modern horror-sci-fi sensibility to the story. The horror is already implicit. Gutierrez makes it explicit.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    Cocote, filmed entirely in the Dominican Republic, is filled with such images, seemingly unconnected to one another at times and yet when placed in collage they create a powerful and visceral experience.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Sheila O'Malley
    The film is a disappointingly empty experience.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Sheila O'Malley
    The extraordinarily assured feature film debut by writer-director and standup comedian Bo Burnham, starts out with one of these videos and it is so touchingly real, so embarrassingly true to life, you might swear it was improvised, or found footage. But it's not. This is Elsie Fisher, a 13-year-old actress herself, amazingly in touch with what it's like to be in the stage of life she's actually in.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Sheila O'Malley
    The film is beautiful in spots, and features a believably tormented performance by Vincent Cassel as Gauguin, but unfortunately it has only a hazy idea of what it wants to be about.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Sheila O'Malley
    Leave No Trace is, at times, heartbreaking, but it's also filled with glimpses of almost casual human kindness, throwaway moments of good will and inclusion piercing through what could be the bleakest of tales.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    The King has a restless, kaleidoscopic, take-a-snapshot-and-move-on energy. In many ways, it's a documentary about everything, it's a documentary about "then" and it's a documentary about "right now."
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Sheila O'Malley
    En el Séptimo Dia makes its points powerfully, even more so since the set-up is so simple. Even better, its third act is as thrilling as anything in a traditional sports movie. McKay's control of tone and rhythm is in high gear, creating a work both thought-provoking and hugely entertaining.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Sheila O'Malley
    Hearts Beat Loud could use more urgency in the telling, more sense of what is at stake for the characters.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    It's not just a story of an incredible feat of survival. It's also a love story, presented with the subtlety of a sledgehammer.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    The film is one long interrogation, not only from Jennifer the character's standpoint, but from a directorial standpoint.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 38 Sheila O'Malley
    The movie is fairly faithful to the book, and yet so much is lost in the transfer.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    One of the strengths of the film, also written by Pearce, is how much it is willing to withhold, without descending into "Gotcha!" manipulation.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Sheila O'Malley
    RBG
    Cohen and West's approach is so adulatory that the documentary becomes a surface-level work of hagiography.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    A good old-fashioned melodrama, albeit with a quieter touch.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    At a brisk and efficient 78-minutes, Mercury 13 is engaging, yet sadness and anger seeps in as it progresses.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 25 Sheila O'Malley
    Aardvark doesn't know how to do what it wants to do. It's not that the tone is uneven or uncertain, it's that the film doesn't have a tone at all. Because a specific tone isn't established, earnest moments come off as insincere, deep moments seem like they're supposed to be a joke. It's not clear if all of this is by design or an accident from a first-time director.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Sheila O'Malley
    Based on Jonathan Ames' novella of the same name, the film is rooted so firmly in Joe's point of view he sometimes is absent from the screen entirely. We're inside his head.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    As a commentary on Reynolds' career trajectory, The Last Movie Star is hit-or-miss. What is undeniable, though, is the space Rifkin has created where Reynolds can do what Reynolds does best, and if you're a fan (as I am) there's much here to treasure.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Sheila O'Malley
    A lot of grappling happens. The community grapples. The characters grapple. People grapple alone, people grapple together. Grappling is more interesting to watch than certainty, any day of the week.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    When the film focuses on the wine-making process, in the progression from vine to bottle, it's a fascinating and detailed look at a very specific subculture.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Sheila O'Malley
    Director Greg Berlanti, who has helmed a string of hit television shows as producer and writer, uses the familiar teenage romance genre to tell an LGBTQ story, and in so doing makes these tropes feel fresh, fun, entertaining.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Sheila O'Malley
    The story is simple — too simple, in fact — and some of its more intriguing elements could use further developing, but the presence of Huppert makes Souvenir well worth a look.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Sheila O'Malley
    The dialogue creates an arch and artificial mood, never sounding like real talk despite the clearly talented actors (Gugu Mbatha-Raw and Michiel Huisman) playing the roles. The film itself seems to be in denial about its own story.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    What is most unexpected about Permission is its sense of poignancy and tenderness. In its own way, it's quite heartbreaking.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 63 Sheila O'Malley
    The problem is there's not enough sex and too much ... everything else.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Sheila O'Malley
    Suffused with fantastical elements, dreamlike sequences and hallucinatory images, A Fantastic Woman stars Daniela Vega, a trans actress, and her performance roots the film in a kind of intimate verisimilitude.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 25 Sheila O'Malley
    So poorly done, its tone so lackadaisical and uncommitted, it's not clear half the time what you're even watching. If it's supposed to be a comedy, it's not funny. If it's supposed to be a satire, it doesn't know what it's satirizing. The biggest problem is that the stakes are never high enough to invest in any of it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    Conflict doesn’t have to be some huge melodramatic thing, but the total lack of inner conflict in Mary might be why Mary and the Witch’s Flower — as transportive and entertaining as it is — feels a little slight.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Sheila O'Malley
    A sweet film with a purity of purpose and intent, elevating it above other films portraying similar struggles.

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