For 175 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Sam Adams' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Barbara
Lowest review score: 10 The Mummy
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 93 out of 175
  2. Negative: 11 out of 175
175 movie reviews
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Sam Adams
    It’s goofy as hell and borderline inexcusable at times, but it’s also kind of glorious.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Sam Adams
    Like last year’s "Ralph Breaks the Internet," the movie evolves into a parable about toxic masculinity and the danger of mistaking darkness for depth, but Lego Movie 2’s frequent flips to the real world subject its underlying text to a scrutiny it can’t bear, and take the fun out of reading between the lines. Lord and Miller have always known what they’re doing, but here it feels like they need you to know it, too.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Sam Adams
    Neither movie is perfect, and each underlines the other’s flaws, but if you’re watching one, watch Fyre, which is both less self-righteous and less inclined to punctuate its insights with Family Guy clips.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Sam Adams
    It’s also hard not to judge it against the movie it might have been. In 2000, Unbreakable felt like an anomaly, a superhero movie that steered clear of camp and dug into the genre’s bedrock. It could have been thrilling to extend that approach into 2019, where superheroes storm the multiplex on a monthly basis, and there’s no longer a need to laboriously explain the culture behind them. Unfortunately, it seems that laborious explanations are the part Shyamalan likes. He’s the evil mastermind detailing his plot for world domination, knowing that the villain’s monologue is a terrible cliché but unable to resist the urge.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Sam Adams
    Welcome to Marwen is a tragedy, not because of how Mark’s story ends, but because it’s the work of a filmmaker who’s never been more sure of his craft, and never less connected to anything resembling actual human experience. The movie’s underlying theme is that fantasy is an escape from the real world that can help people return to it, but it doesn’t seem like Zemeckis is ever coming back.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Sam Adams
    Wan not only embraces the inherent silliness of a hero whose signature power is talking to fish; he revels in it, finding the childlike awesomeness at its core. You can still see every plot beat coming from miles away, but it feels like destiny rather than repetition, the fulfillment of a promise every movie makes and few deliver on.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Sam Adams
    After a solid decade of Marvel movies modeled on the same template, it’s a thrill to watch one that’s allowed to find its own rhythms, to play with form and content without contorting the plot to fit in a minor character who might become important five movies from now.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Sam Adams
    Coogler’s Creed interrogated the Rocky series, including the great-white-hope subtext of the originals, from the ground up, but Creed II just skims along the surface.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Sam Adams
    Ralph Breaks the Internet is crammed with Easter eggs and fine details.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 20 Sam Adams
    For Alvarez, Lisbeth Salander is an icon first and last, which is to say she never feels like an actual person. Here, she’s just a Goth version of James Bond, and if this is Alvarez’s audition for the next Bond movie, then give him the job — he’s exactly the kind of director with style to burn and not too many ideas who you wouldn’t mind seeing donate two years of his career to an aging franchise.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Sam Adams
    The Other Side of the Wind is a mess about messes, pretension about pretension, an exhausted movie about artistic exhaustion. And, eerily, it’s a movie about a director who dies too soon and is survived by his own unfinished work. Whether it’s great is almost beside the point. That it exists is astonishment enough.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Sam Adams
    It certainly doesn’t work in Mid90s’ favor that it is the third movie released in the past two months to focus on an outsider with a turbulent home life seeking out community in the world of skateboarding. Even without the unflinching documentary "Minding the Gap" and the sure-handed docufiction "Skate Kitchen," Mid90s would feel phony, but the former’s understated and thoughtful treatment of its protagonists’ real-life tragedies contrasts sharply with Hill’s attempts to wring pathos from his manufactured ones. Next to them, Mid90s just looks like a poser.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Sam Adams
    The movie’s most profound performance isn’t Stenberg’s, although their emotional lucidity makes them a good proxy for its intended young adult audience, but Hornsby’s, as a father fighting to prepare his children for a world in which the people who are supposed to protect them can be a profound threat.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Sam Adams
    Venom wants to be something different, an off-kilter dark comedy whose protagonist doesn’t need to be cleaned up so he can fight alongside Iron Man someday. But it’s also terrified to step out of line, and the stench of fear overwhelms whatever wisps of fresh air have sneaked through the cracks in the doorway.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Sam Adams
    Moore’s overarching points hit home with such force that sweating the details would be like picking fleas off a charging grizzly.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Sam Adams
    There’s a striking similarity in how American Dharma and "Fahrenheit 11/9" end, with the confident prediction that a revolution is coming, if it is not already here. Moore and Bannon are talking about opposite insurgencies, but they both see a country on the verge of explosion. Moore wants to light a match, and Morris wants to snuff one out.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Sam Adams
    Greene lets the contemporary resonances reveal themselves by implication rather than thrusting them upon us.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Sam Adams
    It’s a movie whose minor characters are cleanly etched without resorting to types, so richly detailed that you can imagine them living full lives off-screen, yet it reminds you that one of the virtues of movies is, or at least can be, their conciseness.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Sam Adams
    Skyscraper is like the last stage of a national trauma, the weakened form it takes before it passes out of the body politic for good.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Sam Adams
    For a massive summer tentpole, Fallout’s pleasures are gratifyingly straightforward, direct without being dumbed-down. It’s a meat-and-potatoes banquet, one that doesn’t need to be interesting to be satisfying.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Sam Adams
    Fallen Kingdom understands that, as much as Jurassic Park has the shape of an action movie, its roots are in horror, and Bayona takes evident glee in drawing out his scares.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Sam Adams
    It’s almost impossible to conceive of a movie better suited to the present moment of reckoning with sexual abuse, and one better equipped to extend and complicate that extraordinarily necessary conversation. The time for The Tale is now.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Sam Adams
    The action sequences in Incredibles 2, which was edited by Stephen Schaffer, are elegantly conceived and fluidly executed, as good as anything we’re likely to see on screen this year, in animation or live action, which only makes the rest of the movie seem that much clunkier by comparison.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Sam Adams
    Not too far beneath the movie’s superficial abrasiveness is a desperate desire to be loved, a puppyish determination that is both hard to resist and, eventually, difficult to endure.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Sam Adams
    It’s galling for a movie that costs so much and takes up so much cultural space to try to do so little, but it’s a familiar disappointment, like the dull ache of a tooth that only bothers you when you bite down on it wrong.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Sam Adams
    Sitting through its 2 hours and 30 minutes is like gorging on tapas: You wind up both overstuffed and unsatisfied.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Sam Adams
    There are moments when the movie takes us firmly by the hand and escorts us down a darkened path, and they lead to one of the most profound of communal pleasures: the sound of a movie audience screaming as one.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Sam Adams
    In a film of more prepossessing style, the glaring leaps of logic might be easier to overlook, or at least there’d be more incentive to do so, but the cellphone is Soderbergh’s enemy as well.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Sam Adams
    The best thing you can say about The Strangers: Prey at Night, the sequel to writer-director Bryan Bertino’s 2008 home-invasion creeper, is that it reminds you the original exists.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Sam Adams
    The back and forth between McAdams and Bateman is what makes Game Night sing.

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