For 2,700 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Roger Moore's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Moana
Lowest review score: 0 Mike Boy
Score distribution:
2700 movie reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    The Changeover is a moody, menacing thriller with a YA (Young Adult) heroine.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Moore
    For a “sweet nothing” of a movie, you kind of wish “nothing” wasn’t the most accurate description.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Roger Moore
    There’s just a hint of “art” to all this, of course. But just a hint. Mostly it’s just random and pointless scenes circling a heroine who is just a 19 year-old, living her life and doing what she loves after the rain stops.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Minding the Gap is a film of skill, pathos and humor, not the deepest movie up for an Best Documentary Oscar this year, but certainly the most approachable.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Moore
    Writer-director Christopher Landon is better at calling for cute camera angles and 360 degree pans and plotting — silly and farfetched as it is — than he is at jokes and zingers, which made the first film stand out.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Erlingsson takes a fairly cut-and-dried caper comedy and tosses twist after twist into it, letting Woman at War surprise us just as often as it repeats a running gag (the poor, cursing bicycle-camping Spaniard).
    • 60 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Moore
    Wilson, letting the strain show the way a hundred other funny folks expected to “save” a flimsy comedy built around them have before her, has never seemed more out of her depth.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    Greene has a lot more to play than West, but truthfully, the leads seem like bemused anchors for the funnier characters to bounce off of. That’s sitcom writing.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Moore
    I didn’t hate “Cold Pursuit,” but it’s not the giddy darker-than-dark murder-comedy that “In Order of Disappearance” was, and that this film’s trailers (Memorably choreographed to “Don’t Fear the Reaper,” a MUCH better title, BTW) promised.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Moore
    Still, the frights, with Mom seeing the hand-chopping serial killer’s face (Paul Fauteux) on her little boy’s body, the stabbings and threats of worse to come (hilariously foreshadowed to death) deliver the requisite pulse-stopping punch...If that’s all you’re hoping for in a horror picture, fine. If not, you’ve been warned.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    A documentary of gentle surprises, reflection and tenderness, depicting a troubled part of the world’s truly original take on the concept of what a “biker gang” could be.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    No, it’s not on a par with “Bridesmaids” or “Girls’ Trip.” The sentimental stuff, the piercing insights Ali picks up about men, are instantly forgettable. But Henson plays the hell out of this part, no subtlety allowed.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Moore
    There’s a "don’t overthink this” watchability to Miss Bala.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 38 Roger Moore
    Mostly though, Beneath the Leaves keeps us at arm’s length and the cast at half-speed, a disappointing combination when your aim was an intricate, raw-nerves thriller with visceral violence, surprises and characters we connect with enough to root for.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Roger Moore
    Filmmaker Berkowitz? He might be worth watching, too. The dialogue works and the performances hold up. But with a background in editing, he’s still not showing us much command of story and pacing. Maybe next time, as this outing only achieves “close, but no title this time” status.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    The difference between “The Lego Movie” and The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part is the distance between “love” and “like.”
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Snyder and co-writer Jason Begue paint a delightful alternative portrait of Hasidism and its practioners, going beyond the rituals and beyond respectful mockery, showing us foul-mouthed kids and an insular world clumsily at odds with the culture they’ve settled in.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Moore
    It’s a star vehicle, awards bait and a showcase thriller that barely holds your interest as you wait through the whispers and “She looks TERRIBLE” closeups for something exciting or moving to happen.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    The leads are showcased engagingly, the locations — even ruined a bombed out Polish church, but including Paris, Yugoslavia and Occupied Berlin — rendered in romantic tones. But there’s not enough connection between those leads to generate the level of heat aimed for here.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    Labiki isn’t above manipulating us as she lightly underlines the points she wants to emphasize, but she never lets Capernaum turn into a lecture.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Moore
    I can’t speak to the manga that inspired it, but Cameron, Rodriguez and third screenwriter Laeta Kalogridis give us settings, characters and story elements from “Blade Runner,” “Robocop” and “Rollerball,” all hanging from the framework of Cameron’s TV series, “Dark Angel.” Whatever comfort these over-familiar tropes deliver, “surprise” and “invention” don’t figure here.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Roger Moore
    No matter how big your TV, you have to think the biggest screen is where this wondrous relic of the pop festivals of the 1960s belongs.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Roger Moore
    Huss holds center stage with a body-contorting commitment like few actors we’ve seen outside of an A-picture about addiction. It’s great work in a middling movie.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Moore
    In Like Flynn would probably benefit from lowered “cut-rate Indiana Jones” expectations. But Mulcahy is too visual (a music video vet) and visceral a director to not lift them, just a bit, in the best of those early scenes, before the weary screenplay limited supply of charisma in the cast let him and the movie down.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Roger Moore
    It’s a far-from-awful folk tale with a horrific edge. But it’s not suspenseful, and the generally unaffecting performances by the Israeli cast fail to draw us in and create empathy for the endangered.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    Director Robert Schwartzman keeps the tone light and the pace between funny scenes and cringe-worthy moments quick. He’s the brother of actor/director Jason Schwartzman and son of Talia Shire and, with them and Sofia Coppola and Nicolas Cage, part of the extended family of Coppola filmmakers.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    As familiar as the path Then Came You generally takes might be, it’s got lots of clever laugh-at-death touches, a few sparkling surprises and a gut-punch third act “reveal.”
    • tbd Metascore
    • 38 Roger Moore
    This is smelly, dirty authentic-feeling male bonding and is the best thing in the movie.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Roger Moore
    The setting, the sexy tone, the cast and snippets of sharp dialogue tamped down my eye rolling through the film’s first half. McConaughey, who has more than his share of seaside tales, gives fair value in delivering salty lines.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Roger Moore
    [Franti] asks good questions, doesn’t overwhelm the film with his own story and just oozes empathy and easygoing charm everywhere he goes.

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