Randall Colburn

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For 59 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1 point lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Randall Colburn's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 91 Mustang
Lowest review score: 16 War Dogs
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 36 out of 59
  2. Negative: 8 out of 59
59 movie reviews
    • 49 Metascore
    • 58 Randall Colburn
    The franchise, however, feels less solid than Washington’s performance. There’s a formulaic quality to it, an aversion to the basics of world-building that gives The Equalizer 2 an outdated feel in a cinematic landscape where more attention is being paid to continuity and myth-making.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 42 Randall Colburn
    How It Ends ends with something of a whimper, leaving us feeling as if a compelling story was undercut by being told through its least interesting characters.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Randall Colburn
    The First Purge is every bit as nakedly, hysterically symbolic as its predecessors. But if there’s one thing that the current political climate is teaching us, it’s that a subtle touch isn’t always the solution.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Randall Colburn
    As was the case with the majority of blaxploitation films, the original Super Fly’s appeal wasn’t in its story so much as the ways in which it carved out an unapologetically black vision that served to capture a particular era in terms of its themes, music, and fashion. X has done that here, but he’s also crafted a crowd-pleasing summer blockbuster that will appeal to the modern filmgoer.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Randall Colburn
    Drew Pearce‘s Hotel Artemis...falls victim to much of what ails any ensemble picture — rushed plotting, forced coincidence, indulgence — but still manages to make a big impression.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 25 Randall Colburn
    The only subtlety to be found is in the performance of singer and actress Charlotte Gainsbourg, though it’s her co-star, Jim Carrey, who will be the subject of most of this strange, ugly film’s discussion. And why not? It’s a bizarre, fascinating turn for Carrey.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Randall Colburn
    You know the characters, the beats, and the general arc. You know how it will end before the first act concludes, and that’s fine. The journey’s pleasant enough.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 33 Randall Colburn
    Unfortunately, the good stuff comes not only too late, but is more or less undone by a head-scratcher of an ending.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Randall Colburn
    Hawke is too committed for Toller’s humanity to not shine through. It’s a layered, transformative performance, his gritting, introverted Toller bearing no traces of the rambling, loose-limbed Hawke of Richard Linklater’s canon.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 67 Randall Colburn
    It’s a mess, but a glorious one, the kind of ambitious, unapologetic project that’s most notable for its perspective.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Randall Colburn
    Hereditary‘s horror functions on multiple levels. What we see is undoubtedly terrifying, but it’s how we see it that truly distinguishes the film.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Randall Colburn
    Director Kay Cannon‘s perspective is the film’s biggest asset, as it freshens up the traditional formula’s inevitable focus on love, consent, and orientation in ways that maintain the sub-genre’s trademark raunch.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 83 Randall Colburn
    It is impressive, though, the way the movie works to incorporate new online phenomenons, from Bitcoin to swatting. The latter bit, especially, resonates as one of the film’s most unsettling elements, if only because it feels so depressingly possible. Truly, it’s surprising just how soul-crushing Dark Web becomes after luring us in with so many intriguing mysteries, but, hey, this is the internet we’re talking about.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Randall Colburn
    The careful, strategic navigation of silence and noise is the film’s greatest asset, and when it explores this tension, and the way in which it impacts both the characters and monsters, the result is vibrant, urgent, and innovative.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 25 Randall Colburn
    There’s something distinctly odious about a storyteller exploiting both a city’s tragic reality and a country’s debate about firearms to make a film that thrives on violence.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Randall Colburn
    The Ritual is rich, meaty horror that, despite your feelings regarding its twists and turns, offers up a gripping balance of psychological terror and physical revulsion.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Randall Colburn
    It’s weird, intermittently amusing gobbledygook that should help a drowsy weekday night pass a bit quicker. Unfortunately, mediocrity won’t do much for the Cloverfield brand, which set a high bar for itself with 10 Cloverfield Lane.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Randall Colburn
    As it lurches into its second act, Before I Wake begins slavishly following the beats of its studio horror contemporaries, (mostly) abandoning its nuance for rote investigations into the cause of the phenomena and horror set pieces that defy the previously established logic of the dream manifestations.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Randall Colburn
    Robitel and Whannel are still too bound to the franchise here to make something truly original, but The Last Key will make you grip your armrest, squint your eyes, and prepare for the worst. Sometimes, that’s enough.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 58 Randall Colburn
    Bitch‘s third act is an improvement upon its second, mainly in that the movie allows itself to be weird again.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Randall Colburn
    LBJ
    Though Harrelson’s performance is nothing if not memorable, it lacks dynamism. His tone and cadence, though booming, becomes familiar as the film barrels on, and the plasticine nature of his prosthetics is distracting.... It’s a good performance, but not a layered one.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Randall Colburn
    Not all of Killing Gunther lands as well as it should. The humor feels inconsistent at times.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 42 Randall Colburn
    Happy Death Day is a lot of fun when it allows itself to have fun.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Randall Colburn
    It’s not easy, balancing careful character development and a vivid sense of place with the bloodlust of expectations, but Zahler’s done it here.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 25 Randall Colburn
    American Assassin never transcends the exploitation at its core.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Randall Colburn
    Lemon remains wholly original throughout, rendering old themes fresh with its bold perspective. It’s also incredibly funny, even when it’s dunking our heads into the darkness of the human psyche.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Randall Colburn
    Sandberg finds much of his terror in the tension that exists between light and shadow, an unsurprising discovery considering his previous film hinged on the two. They’re used much more effectively here, however.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 Randall Colburn
    In building worlds as detailed and vivid as he’s done here, Besson has essentially allowed the setting to do what’s typically reserved for characters and stakes, and that’s to make us care.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Randall Colburn
    Shimmer Lake’s climax does a fine job of bringing together its disparate parts for a resolution that’s surprising, effective, and logical.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Randall Colburn
    It Comes at Night isn’t scary so much as it’s horrific, though Shults is extremely gifted at cultivating the kind of slow, droning dread that inflates in your chest like a black balloon.

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