Owen Gleiberman

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For 2,795 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Owen Gleiberman's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 The Player
Lowest review score: 0 Hudson Hawk
Score distribution:
2795 movie reviews
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The First Purge is a slipshod B-movie comic book rooted in gangbanger clichés. It’s a threadbare “Boyz N the Hood” meets “Lord of the Flies.”
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Owen Gleiberman
    Ideal Home is a trifle, but more than that it’s caught between eras, poised between wanting to crack you up at what cranky prima donnas its characters are and to make you tear up at the revelation of their normal hearts. The result? A comedy of flamboyant banality.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Owen Gleiberman
    Ant-Man and the Wasp has a pleasingly breakneck, now-you-see-it-now-you-don’t surreal glee. It’s a cunningly swift and delightful comedy of scale.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Owen Gleiberman
    The film simply examines the prejudice that’s standing right in front of it. It’s chilling, but it’s the tip of the iceberg.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    Promised Land is a searching, flawed, let’s-try-this-on-and-see-how-it-looks movie. At times, it veers too close to being a standard Elvis chronicle, and at others its insight into our national neurosis may strike you as a tad ethereal. It’s an essay in the form of an investigation. Yet it’s the definition of tasty food for thought.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Shot in a functional, slammed-together manner that’s less sensually stylish than you’d expect from a music-video auteur, the film is a competent yet glossy and hermetic street-hustle drug thriller, less a new urban myth than a lavishly concocted episode. It holds your attention yet leaves you with nothing.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    What was organic, and even obsessive, in the first outing comes off as pat and elaborate formula here. The new movie, energized as it is, too often feels like warmed-over sloppy seconds, with a what-do-we-do-now? riff that turns into an overly on-the-nose plot.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    The heist is fun and convincing without being dazzling, and some of the most amusing stuff in the film is just character comedy.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The first “Jurassic World” was, quite simply, not a good ride. “Fallen Kingdom” is an improvement, but it’s the first “Jurassic” film to come close to pretending it isn’t a ride at all, and as a result it ends up being just a passable ride.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The film isn’t a dud — it “delivers the goods” in a certain reductive, baseline action-fanboy way. Yet Upgrade is the sort of movie that thinks it’s more ingenious than it is, starting with the premise, which is a semi-catchy, semi-stupido hoot in a way that the movie couldn’t have completely intended.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    Woodley gives herself over to the physical and spiritual reality of each scene. She knows how to play an ordinary woman who’s wild at heart, and she keeps you captivated, even when the film itself is watchable in a perfectly competent, touching, and standard way.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Owen Gleiberman
    Each elegantly framed shot, every deftly observed moment expresses something organic and moving.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Owen Gleiberman
    Fonte, it must be said, gives an expert performance as a saintly scamp who “blooms” into a butterfly of vengeance. I might have bought what he’s doing in a different film, but the one that Garrone has made strains too hard to have it both ways.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Owen Gleiberman
    Our world, in The Image Book, has finally caught up to Jean-Luc Godard’s doom-laden dream of it. He seems to be saying that we all have a choice: to change it, or to sit back in our TV armchairs and watch.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Owen Gleiberman
    Macdonald’s multi-faceted portrait of Houston allows us to touch the intertwined forces that did her in.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Owen Gleiberman
    Under the Silver Lake gets its hooks in you, but it’s a good-bad movie: an academic stab at making the darkness visible.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The House That Jack Built, however, only rarely achieves that level of disturbing poetic awe. The film lopes along in a way that’s grimly absorbing yet, at the same time, falls short of fully immersive.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Owen Gleiberman
    Penna works in what you might call a gratifyingly prosaic style. He doesn’t wow you (though the film, in its level way, is elegantly shot). But he doesn’t cheat you, either, so you come to trust the gravity of his nuts-and-bolts storytelling.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Owen Gleiberman
    Climax works, at least when it’s willing to be a human drama. But then it sinks in that you’re watching “Fame” directed by the Marquis de Sade with a Steadicam.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Owen Gleiberman
    Sara Driver, the director of “Boom for Real” (who was there at the time, as Jim Jarmusch’s early producer and romantic partner), creates an alluring and detailed portrait of how the downtown scene came together, springing up like weeds between the cracks of a broken New York, its poverty-row aesthetic infused with the energy of punk and the vivacity of hip-hop (before it was called that).
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Owen Gleiberman
    Overboard has been made with enough bubbly comic spirit and skill that the gender switch turns out to be a smart move, from both an entertainment and commercial vantage. Like the original, the new version is a snarky situational farce that evolves into a cheese-dog fable of home and hearth, and the role reversal lets it feel halfway fresh.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Owen Gleiberman
    The whole thing becomes drenched in a kind of downbeat sentimental martyrdom that feels oppressively old-fashioned and moribund.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Owen Gleiberman
    There’s dialogue, but very little interchange. The movie makes your average mumblecore mumblefest sound like Preston Sturges.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    It’s a tender, wrenching, and beautifully made movie, and part of what’s revelatory about it is that it’s a story of boomers who are confronting the ravages of old age (disease and death, the waning of dreams), yet they’re doing it with a stubborn echo of the hopes and desires they had when they were younger.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Zoe
    Zoe, like Cole, ties itself up in a lot of high-minded hand-wringing, and the result is that the movie, though it’s not badly told, fails to grip you.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The opening title says “Based on an absurd but true story,” yet there’s nothing absurd about the facts. Improbable? Yes. Hapless and desperate? Most definitely. But the absurdity — the impulse to giggle — is mostly there in the eye of the writer-director, Robert Budreau, who collaborated with Hawke two years ago on the entrancing Chet Baker biopic “Born to Be Blue” but here comes off as a far less sure-handed filmmaker.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie, a wayward portrait with surrealist touches, is trying for something genuine. Yet despite some good scenes, some tart lines...and an atmosphere of saintly desperation that suggests “Trainspotting” redone as a darkened YA fable, the movie is wispy and meandering; it doesn’t gather power as it goes along.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    Love, Gilda is plain but beautifully crafted. It draws you close to Radner, presenting her rise through the world of ’70s comedy as a journey of discovery.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Owen Gleiberman
    It’s a sleekly witty action opera that’s at once overstuffed and bedazzling.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 30 Owen Gleiberman
    Super Troopers 2 is an aggressively lame and slobby comedy full of cardboard characters and in-your-face naughty jokes that feel about as dangerous as old vaudeville routines.

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