For 1,498 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 9% same as the average critic
  • 38% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Noel Murray's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Lethal Weapon
Lowest review score: 0 Is That a Gun in Your Pocket?
Score distribution:
1498 movie reviews
    • 27 Metascore
    • 30 Noel Murray
    The characters, the plot, and — unfortunately — the star are all interchangeable with the elements of hundreds of other international thrillers.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Noel Murray
    Knight does a good job of establishing the political complexities of a more theocratic age. But then The Appearance pivots straight to the usual assortment of things going bump in the night, which — as it turns out — aren’t suddenly less clichéd when everyone’s wearing robes.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Noel Murray
    Hospitality is both an exercise in atmosphere and an actors’ showcase, letting its cast settle deep into the skins of these people who just need something in their lives to break their way … even if they’ve done nothing to deserve it.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Noel Murray
    Perlman has a physical presence that makes him look like he stepped off the cover of a paperback. He brings soul to this old hired gun, who’s become a creature of habit, mired in a daily routine of killing other people and waiting to die.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Noel Murray
    The movie’s grating a lot of the time, but often very funny, and perversely fascinating. Most importantly, it's always as honest as it is painful.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Noel Murray
    A stellar cast and a breezy tone partially compensate for the movie’s shortcomings.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 30 Noel Murray
    Director John Pogue brings some grit and energy to the action sequences, but ultimately Blood Brother is just a compendium of pulp clichés, with nothing to say about these characters or the worlds they inhabit.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Noel Murray
    Default successfully turns a global financial crisis into a movie that’s at once engaging and educational.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Noel Murray
    The film’s as eclectic as it is eccentric, and it stays true to its own twisted sense of poetry, all the way to an epilogue that’s somehow even odder than anything that came before.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Noel Murray
    The acting throughout is excellent; and it helps that Barrial isn’t playing Leonard’s predicament for cheap laughs or amped-up drama. Instead, he’s documenting what it’s like these days, to try and find some meaning in life while scrounging all night long, terrified to miss whatever meager scraps are being tossed.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Noel Murray
    8 Remains has a cool premise, but director Juliane Block and screenwriter Laura Sommer (with dialogue assistance from Wolf-Peter Arand) treat it more as a metaphor than as a storytelling opportunity.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Noel Murray
    The characters and story take a backseat to the movie’s message — which is as subtle as a roundhouse punch.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Noel Murray
    The cast of Texas Cotton is good company, and the location’s a nice place to hang out for an hour and a half. But all these nice folks are worthy of more than such a flat, featureless story.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Noel Murray
    By the time the Tinker fantasy elements kick in, they seem more like an afterthought than the reason this movie was made in the first place.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Noel Murray
    With scares at a minimum, Astral relies heavily on its young cast, who are all likable and charismatic. Dillane and Idris and the others are undoubtedly destined to appear someday in movies and TV shows far more memorable than this one.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 30 Noel Murray
    At every turn in Speed Kills, director Jodi Scurfield and a team of screenwriters sand the edges off a complicated, multi-decade saga, making a featureless knockoff of seemingly every sweeping true-crime movie of the past three decades.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Noel Murray
    Strong lead performances by Aaron Paul and Emily Ratajkowski are squandered in Welcome Home, a low-tension suspense picture with pretensions of saying something profound about broken relationships.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Noel Murray
    Cam
    On a narrative level, Mazzei and Goldhaber don’t come up with enough ideas for how to capitalize on their hooky premise. But on a character level? The filmmakers and Brewer capture the mounting existential anxiety of a woman who’s constructed an entire identity on-line and is horrified to see that it can keep on living without her.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Noel Murray
    While the story’s a little shaky, Poots is outstanding; and de Fontenay has a terrific eye for the details of a drifter’s life, shuffling from hovel to hovel, never able to scrape up enough cash to sleep comfortably.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Noel Murray
    Skiles keeps the film’s pacing slow, which at times builds tension, at times makes everything feel more off-kilter, and at times is … well, just slow. Mostly the director and his superb cast use the extra time to explore the nuances of Ford’s tale of sick compulsions and social pressures.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 30 Noel Murray
    Raising awareness of social injustice is a good goal, but not enough to hold an audience’s attention.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Noel Murray
    The cast is terrific, and kudos to Boyd for including some specifics about how 20-something Angelenos hook up in the 2010s. But there’s just not enough that’s new here — either in what’s being said, or how.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Noel Murray
    Palmer is a firecracker as the heroine, a young woman who has to prove she’s as hard — and consequently, as misogynist — as any man.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Noel Murray
    Like Agnès Varda’s similar 1962 French New Wave classic “Cléo From 5 to 7,” the thoughtful Here and Now uses one woman’s sudden awareness of her own mortality as an excuse to focus intently on the many moments of intense emotion that make up a day in the big city.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Noel Murray
    Mostly, it’s impressive how Bowler reimagines his own Oscar-nominated 2011 short film. He takes his original idea of using time-travel as a kind of metaphysical Photoshop and seriously thinks through how it would work — and whether it’s possible to have a “happy ending” when revision is always an option.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Noel Murray
    The movie’s too slow at the start and somewhat befuddling at the end, but for the most part it’s a haunting, poignant portrait of one woman’s Kafkaesque nightmare.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Noel Murray
    Mostly, this is a whirlwind trip through the origins of a phenomenon, with an eye toward explaining how America could find these ladies at once sexy and wholesome. The answer? Hey man, it was the ‘70s.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Noel Murray
    The movie is pretty lightweight — disemboweling aside — but has a fair amount of punch, and it could appeal to connoisseurs of self-conscious pulp.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Noel Murray
    Perhaps the best use of Caldwell and Earl’s limited budget is their cast, which also includes Andre Royo and Anwan Glover as dangerous men. They help keep “Prospect” from becoming a gimmicky mash-up and make it more a study of real people just trying to get by far from civilization.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Noel Murray
    The cast is talented, the direction is fairly crisp and the dialogue isn’t stiff. When the people who made this movie move on to something better, they’ll have no reason to be embarrassed by where they started.

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