For 2,799 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mick LaSalle's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Malèna
Lowest review score: 0 Harry + Max
Score distribution:
2799 movie reviews
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Mick LaSalle
    Howard and Pratt don’t get to do much besides run like hell, but a movie like this in a way emphasizes rather than obscures the importance of star quality. They’re just so good-looking that it’s a pleasure to watch them -- idealized surrogates for humanity.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    Tag
    Tag isn’t interesting at all, but its failure is. It’s the kind of movie that makes the viewer ask questions, such as, why isn’t this working? Why is this bombing? Why is this dying the death? Why am I shifting in my seat just to stay conscious? The movie seems like it should be funny, but it’s not, so why?
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Mick LaSalle
    One of the nicest things about Hearts Beat Loud, and there are several nice things, is the way that Offerman and Clemons seem like father and daughter. This is the work of the actors, but also of the director.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Mick LaSalle
    Incredibles 2 was 14 years in the making, and it feels almost that long watching it.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    As a first-time director, Pearce manages something difficult. He creates a tone that acknowledges absurdity, but also consequences. He finds an edge that’s extreme, that’s weird, that’s satirical and that goes right to the edge of farce, and yet the movie is at all points as involving as an intense drama.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Mick LaSalle
    From a narrative feature, we want drama and illumination, the truths that go beyond the plain facts. That’s where Mary Shelley comes up a bit short. It’s never less than competent and intelligent, and here and there it’s better than that.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    Woodley has been first-rate in everything she’s been in, particularly the “Divergent” series. But there’s something about her performance here that feels like the sincere and dutiful dispersal of medicine.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Mick LaSalle
    As entertainment, On Chesil Beach isn’t remotely satisfying, but it does deserve credit for being weird.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    First Reformed has a confidence about it, the presence of filmmaking consciousness that can’t do wrong, because this time he knows exactly what he wants to say, not only in a general sense, but second by second and shot by shot.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Mick LaSalle
    There is a built-in pleasure in seeing Diane Keaton, Candice Bergen, Jane Fonda and Mary Steenburgen in the same movie. We’re used to them. We like them. We like being around them — but not so much that we can’t notice that Book Club is a pretty strained affair, not especially funny and weirdly off key.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    The performances are extraordinary, as they often are in Beauvois’ films, with Baye a study in quiet suffering and Bry wonderfully enigmatic — seemingly simple, but hinting at a soul capable of expansion and adaptation.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Mick LaSalle
    The Seagull has all the big things going for it and yet so many little things going against it that it’s just not the movie it might have been.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Mick LaSalle
    The last half hour and the lively opening make us almost forget the movie’s so-so middle. It brings all the elements together, points to the future and keeps the action to a human-scale minimum. If you want to see Solo: A Star Wars Story, I wouldn’t talk you out of it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Mick LaSalle
    After shooting lots of people and cutting lots of throats, Deadpool tries blowing himself up, something he probably should have done first. And with that, the movie shifts. Deadpool 2 becomes less violent and a lot funnier. It becomes a much better movie than the original “Deadpool,” not an action bloodbath with laughs, but a knowing spoof of the superhero genre.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 25 Mick LaSalle
    Measure of a Man is intended as a touching coming-of-age film about one crucial summer in a young man’s life. But it’s a movie of gestures and feints, in which we’re constantly being told of events and relationships rather than seeing or feeling them.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Mick LaSalle
    If there’s a weakness to the movie, it’s that, despite its gut-level appeal, it doesn’t dazzle us with anything brilliant or unexpected. However, there are some nifty turns here and there, so it’s not entirely mediocre.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Mick LaSalle
    Life of the Party presents a situation more than a story, and in that it’s more like a sitcom than a conventional movie.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Mick LaSalle
    Two good characters and two good performances go into the old poubelle — or, as we say in English, the garbage bin.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Mick LaSalle
    Tully doesn’t expand as it goes along. It feels insulated and hermetically sealed, and it seems to get smaller.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    The women are remarkable, unforgettable. But don’t overlook Nivola, an enigmatic figure as the rabbi and husband.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Mick LaSalle
    RBG
    Ginsburg herself is determined to last. Several scenes show her working out with a trainer. Her goal is to live long enough for a Democratic president to appoint her successor.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    It’s a deep and moving investigation into one woman’s inner struggle as she goes about looking for true love.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 100 Mick LaSalle
    In color, style and humor — even in its graphics and editing — it’s very much like a Godard film from the mid-1960s. Thus, the experience is like watching an actual Godard film — the first great Godard film since “Masculin Féminin” in 1966.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 50 Mick LaSalle
    All this makes Zama interesting and unique and something to be respected. But none of this translates into anything resembling a satisfying narrative or even entertainment as we know it. Still, as bleak experiments go, Zama is the real thing.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Mick LaSalle
    Over the last few years, the Avengers, together and separately, have spawned a number of good, very good, or reasonably entertaining movies. But with Avengers: Infinity War, the Marvel Comics franchise arrives at the stage of decadence. There’s just too much of it. A victim of its own success, there are just too many appealing characters here to stuff into one story.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Mick LaSalle
    This whole concept is a rich vein for gags, especially with a comic as at-home with herself as Schumer. But there’s something sweet and wise about it, too.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Mick LaSalle
    A particularly strong element is the story of Carlotta’s father, played with arresting intensity by Laszlo Szabo.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Mick LaSalle
    Much of the success of Little Pink House comes from the casting and the performance of Catherine Keener, an actress that has, simultaneously, an aura of glumness and an atmosphere of fun about her.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Mick LaSalle
    What makes Rampage especially enjoyable is the way it sneaks up on the audience. Before casting off every shred of dignity and abandoning itself to good-humored excess, the movie passes itself off as a reasonably serious science-fiction movie.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Mick LaSalle
    The result is like any other Lynne Ramsay movie, whether it’s “We Need to Talk About Kevin” or “Ratcatcher” — slow, soporific and, here and there, wonderful.

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