Michael O'Sullivan

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For 1,386 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Michael O'Sullivan's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Macbeth
Lowest review score: 0 Tomcats
Score distribution:
1386 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    Too clever for its own good.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Unlike his action-movie rival Johnson, Statham does not have the charisma to carry this film. He gets the job done all right, but makes it feel more like work than play.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film is at its best when evoking the painful labor of adolescent self-discovery, a process — as rendered here — that is not unlike a butterfly struggling to emerge from a chrysalis.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film is pretty conventional Disney fare: silly, slapsticky, all-too-neatly wrapped up and punctuated by a surfeit of poignant moments.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Michael O'Sullivan
    McQueen makes the case that its subject was an artist whose clay was clothing. It also, despite giving short shrift to psychoanalysis, reminds us that everything you might want to know about the artist can be found in the art.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Vreeland’s film, for the most part, is structured around spoken passages from Beaton’s voluminous diaries, which are read, expressively, by Rupert Everett. The actor ably channels the persona of the self-described “rabid aesthete.”
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Meaty interviews with journalist Chris Hedges, for instance, lend the film needed context and a sense of intellectual detachment.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s purely unintentional, but the little numeral dangling, like a broken, mangled finger, from the end of the title of The Equalizer 2 signals more than the fact that this is a sequel to the 2014 action thriller about a violent vigilante. It also lets you know that there are two, and only two, pleasures to be had here.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    As Ravel puts it, the disproportionate influence of money on elections isn’t a Democratic or Republican problem, but a “gateway issue to every other issue you might care about.” Dark Money makes the case, as well as any film can, that she’s pretty much right on the money.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    There are few surprises delivered in Skyscraper, an entertaining if middlebrow thriller whose very name — blandly descriptive, generic — seems to advertise its fungibility.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s one that speaks not just to Presley’s (and, arguably, America’s) fall from grace, but to the imperfections — and, yes, the lofty ambitions — of this strange, in some ways beautiful and in some ways overburdened little film.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Michael O'Sullivan
    Leave No Trace is not a sociological treatise. It has nothing grandiose to say about homelessness or PTSD. It does, however, deliver an effective (and deeply affecting) allegory of the inevitable leave-taking that all of us — housed or unhoused, happy or half mad — must undergo with our loved ones.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite the hot-button subject matter, there is no sense of currency, or even controversy, here. The drama seems less personal or political than one calculated for shock value. One late, violent plot twist is so preposterous as to defy the level of credulity one normally reserves for a horror film.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Plummer is particularly good, delivering every line of dialogue as if it’s improvised, and with an astringent snort that only partially hides the fact that Jack really does care about people. Farmiga, for her part, never strays into histrionics, although she comes close after allowing herself to be seduced by her caddish ex.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Portman, a vegan, is the main tour guide to this challenging excursion to the world of slaughterhouses and CAFOs, which one commentator likens to petri dishes for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Ironically, the film is conspicuous not for its brio but its blandness.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Its smallness is its strength — as is its silence. That’s the odd and evocative resonance of Hearts Beat Loud. For a movie that is so rock-and-roll, it turns out to be less about making noise than about listening to the message that can only be heard in the stillness that comes after the song.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s been a long time coming for Incredibles 2, but the punchline is worth the setup.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    American Animals, while an entertaining version of a heist film at times, is no “Ocean’s 8.” Its signature moment occurs not during the reenactment of the inept crime, or its planning and antic aftermath. Rather, it comes in the middle of one of Lipka’s interview scenes.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Like the gender-flipped “Ghostbusters” before it, this new movie neither reinvents not dishonors its inspiration, instead adding a modicum of zip — if less than turbocharged horsepower — to a vehicle that runs you through the staging of a crime by, ironically, obeying all the traffic laws.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Litte Pink House feels like it’s only ever checking off the requisite moments of civic outrage, while failing to connect with viewers on a level that’s deeper than the average made-for-TV issue-of-the-week movie.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Setting the film in the punk heyday underscores the film’s themes of personal freedom and defying authority. And there are heartwarming touches, despite a plot that is muddied by sci-fi mumbo-jumbo about cannibalism.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    On Chesil Beach can feel like observing a deli worker slice a small piece of rancid cured meat, in increasingly transparent slivers of prosciutto-like thinness, and then holding them up to the light for inspection.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    It transfixes, not with artifice or cheap sentiment, but with a strange alchemy of gloom and light.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Beast sounds like a straightforward erotic mystery thriller, but that atmosphere is at times overshadowed by Pearce’s exploration of British classism, bullying and bigotry.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    There is also something over-intellectualized and bloodless about this version.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Michael O'Sullivan
    Far from lazy, it is a fairly brilliant sendup of comic-book action movies, as well as also being an excellent example of one.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 12 Michael O'Sullivan
    A largely laugh-free exercise in cliche.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 88 Michael O'Sullivan
    Although Measure of a Man is less gut-wrenching than director Jim Loach’s only previous theatrical film, “Oranges and Sunshine” — about the cruel fate of unwanted children shipped from England to Australia during the United Kingdom’s mid-20th-century “child migrant” program — the British filmmaker shows himself to have an affinity for tales of the abuse of power.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Michael O'Sullivan
    Things are never exactly what they seem here — but there’s a deeper, more authentic story Reitman and Cody are interested in telling, even when — maybe especially when — the film veers toward fantasy. If Tully is a movie that cheats, even lies to us a little bit, it’s to get at a more real and recognizable truth.

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