Michael O'Sullivan

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For 1,372 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Michael O'Sullivan's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Mr. Nobody
Lowest review score: 0 Tomcats
Score distribution:
1372 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Portman, a vegan, is the main tour guide to this challenging excursion to the world of slaughterhouses and CAFOs, which one commentator likens to petri dishes for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Ironically, the film is conspicuous not for its brio but its blandness.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Its smallness is its strength — as is its silence. That’s the odd and evocative resonance of Hearts Beat Loud. For a movie that is so rock-and-roll, it turns out to be less about making noise than about listening to the message that can only be heard in the stillness that comes after the song.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s been a long time coming for Incredibles 2, but the punchline is worth the setup.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    American Animals, while an entertaining version of a heist film at times, is no “Ocean’s 8.” Its signature moment occurs not during the reenactment of the inept crime, or its planning and antic aftermath. Rather, it comes in the middle of one of Lipka’s interview scenes.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Like the gender-flipped “Ghostbusters” before it, this new movie neither reinvents not dishonors its inspiration, instead adding a modicum of zip — if less than turbocharged horsepower — to a vehicle that runs you through the staging of a crime by, ironically, obeying all the traffic laws.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Litte Pink House feels like it’s only ever checking off the requisite moments of civic outrage, while failing to connect with viewers on a level that’s deeper than the average made-for-TV issue-of-the-week movie.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Setting the film in the punk heyday underscores the film’s themes of personal freedom and defying authority. And there are heartwarming touches, despite a plot that is muddied by sci-fi mumbo-jumbo about cannibalism.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    On Chesil Beach can feel like observing a deli worker slice a small piece of rancid cured meat, in increasingly transparent slivers of prosciutto-like thinness, and then holding them up to the light for inspection.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    It transfixes, not with artifice or cheap sentiment, but with a strange alchemy of gloom and light.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Beast sounds like a straightforward erotic mystery thriller, but that atmosphere is at times overshadowed by Pearce’s exploration of British classism, bullying and bigotry.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    There is also something over-intellectualized and bloodless about this version.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Michael O'Sullivan
    Far from lazy, it is a fairly brilliant sendup of comic-book action movies, as well as also being an excellent example of one.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 12 Michael O'Sullivan
    A largely laugh-free exercise in cliche.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 88 Michael O'Sullivan
    Although Measure of a Man is less gut-wrenching than director Jim Loach’s only previous theatrical film, “Oranges and Sunshine” — about the cruel fate of unwanted children shipped from England to Australia during the United Kingdom’s mid-20th-century “child migrant” program — the British filmmaker shows himself to have an affinity for tales of the abuse of power.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Michael O'Sullivan
    Things are never exactly what they seem here — but there’s a deeper, more authentic story Reitman and Cody are interested in telling, even when — maybe especially when — the film veers toward fantasy. If Tully is a movie that cheats, even lies to us a little bit, it’s to get at a more real and recognizable truth.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    RBG
    Despite her biting legal writing, she comes across, on camera, as unfailingly mild-mannered, decorous and polite, especially when the film explores her rather unlikely friendship, based on a shared love of opera, with her late conservative colleague Antonin Scalia.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    After Auschwitz also addresses more mundane subjects as well: making a wedding dress from leftover parachute silk, emigrating to America, finding jobs, buying cars, registering to vote. The smallest things become imbued with an importance out of proportion to their significance to the rest of us.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    Infinity War is big, blustery and brave, taking viewers to places that they may not be used to going.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    These ghost stories, if that’s what they are, aren’t terribly original, or even especially scary — at least, not by the standards of the genre.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 25 Michael O'Sullivan
    I Feel Pretty suffers from a fatal flaw: its premise.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Michael O'Sullivan
    The new movie — a sci-fi freakout that, like “Spring,” includes an “it,” but one that’s far less easy to define — is spooky, funny, touching and very, very well made.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Michael O'Sullivan
    At the center of this oddly riveting little picaresque is a performance of such quiet power by Plummer — as an antihero both rash and precociously resourceful — that it’s easy to overlook the film’s flaws.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It becomes clear that the situation is exactly as we imagine it to be, and that the sense of mystery that Shoaf has spent so much energy weaving is a red herring.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 37 Michael O'Sullivan
    The real problem isn’t an overabundance of potential killers. Rather, it’s the fact that the film, from writer-director Aaron Katz (“Land Ho!”), does so little to make you care about the crime, or its victim, that the whole thing feels like an academic exercise.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    There’s an air of “High Noon” to Török’s drama, which features an intrusive sound design, including Tibor Szemzö’s jarringly contemporary score and sound effects that include the ringing of a clock tower, buzzing flies, rumbling thunder and noisy birds — which transition from pleasant tweets to ominous caws of crows by the climax.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s a mildly engrossing if wonky exercise in what could be called a kind of selfish activism.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    If Ready Player One is tedious at times, it’s also oodles of fun at others.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Uprising is loud, packed with impressive effects and propulsive — or as propulsive as a car with no brakes going downhill — but it lacks the heart of del Toro’s original.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 12 Michael O'Sullivan
    A straightforward, B-movie horror flick — “The Snake Pit” without the prestige — complete with intentional overdosing, electroshock torture and patients threatening each other with a sharpened spoons, when they’re not either screaming or catatonic. It also is very, very bad.

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