For 192 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mark Feeney's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Hermia & Helena
Lowest review score: 12 Last Ounce of Courage
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 26 out of 192
192 movie reviews
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    A line gets crossed. It isn’t the one between California and Nevada. It’s the one from “Bad” to worse.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Mark Feeney
    Each of these dames of the realm gets to play the choicest of roles: herself.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    Director David Lowery (“Ain’t them Bodies Saints,” “A Ghost Story”) did the adaptation of David Grann’s New Yorker magazine article. His direction is winningly relaxed, and his script has real flavor.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 38 Mark Feeney
    Moore shows newsreel footage of Hitler delivering a speech. Only it’s not Hitler’s voice we hear. It’s Trump’s. Get it? Sure you do, and as you do the documentary slips the surly bonds of sanity — even of agitprop — to enter a realm of its own polemical making. Words cannot do justice to such an editorial decision. Well, maybe five can: intellectually null and morally contemptible.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    The Children Act isn’t all that interesting a movie, despite the many talented people involved and the generally high level of work they do. The most interesting thing about it is how it presents a case study in the very different way style can determine what works on the screen vs. what works on the page.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    So the big surprise about White Boy Rick is how well the movie works. It’s one thing to know a story is based on nonfiction. Being made to believe its plausibility is something else. White Boy Rick you believe.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    Wilson gives a performance that in its own way is as striking as Gleeson’s.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Kin
    So, yeah, Kin is a bit of a biker movie, too. More important, it’s also a family drama. In their first-time feature-directing effort, twin brothers Jonathan and Josh Baker — speaking of kin — turn Cain and Abel inside out and upside down. Why be east of Eden when you end up that far west of Motown?
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Telling all is not necessarily the same thing as telling the truth, even if Bowers’s memory seems as clear as the glint in his bright blue eyes. Maybe it’s his ego that’s not clear — or too much so.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Maybe the key is how nicely self-aware the move is. On the soundtrack, for example, we hear both “Material Girl” and “Money (That’s What I Want)” sung in Mandarin. Everything’s so over the top it’s a bit weightless, which in this context is a compliment.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    All in all, Beaton could have been a character in an Evelyn Waugh novel — both belonged to the Bright Young Things, in ’20s London — except that he and Waugh detested each other.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    “Don’t Worry” is not a conventional biopic. That makes sense — Callahan sure isn’t a conventional biopic subject — but that unconventionality can present problems. Sometimes the movie is sentimental. More often, it’s scabrous. Maybe if the movie didn’t feel overlong (trim and tight it’s not), those qualities might seem better balanced.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    The idea behind Eugene Jarecki’s nonfiction film The King — you can’t really call it a documentary — is crazy-good inspired.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    Is the movie any good, and does Irving embarrass himself? The answers are: sort of, and nowhere near.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    Holding it all together is his voice-over narration: always intelligent and thoughtful, sometimes wistful, occasionally navel-gazing annoying. Even when annoying, the narration sounds great, thanks to the murmury musicality of Salles’s Portuguese.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Mark Feeney
    The Leisure Seeker is slack and episodic in a way that only a committee could love. The sense of energy and surprise that one expects from a road movie is nowhere to be found. The pleasure of Mirren and Sutherland’s company is considerable, but not that considerable.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    A better title might have been “All the Movies in the World.” We get a thriller, of sorts, and a crime movie, of sorts (Romain Duris, as a kidnapper, gives the most appealing performance). It’s also a morality tale crossed with family melodrama.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    The film’s episodic nature, which serves to underscore the moments of grim drama, adds to the problem. One can only salute the filmmakers’ ambition and seriousness of purpose, but it’s hard to see who The Breadwinner audience is.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Much as there is right with Wonder, there’s just as much that isn’t. Emotionally, the movie rarely feels false.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    Beautifully shot and deeply dispiriting, the documentary examines the global refugee crisis.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Director Tomas Alfredson and cinematographer Dion Beebe have given The Snowman a gloriously subdued look.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    There’s a reason the names in the title don’t appear in alphabetical order. Abdul is the far more interesting character, but it’s her majesty the movie dotes on. God save the queen? Oh yes, and God help the rest of us.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Mark Feeney
    Swinton’s vocal performance as Bell is so vivid and absorbing it could be entered as evidence for the defense. Swinton makes Bell so compelling it’s easy to overlook what a paradoxical figure she was.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Mark Feeney
    Most of all, California Typewriter is an elegy. “The truth is, no good typewriters are going to be made again,” Hanks laments. There’s a reason that the title of the first tune on the fine musical soundtrack is “Stolen Moments.”
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Mark Feeney
    A glorious late-summer pendant.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Mark Feeney
    That’s how the gifted young Argentine writer-director Matías Piñeiro makes his movies, in a style that seems casual and feels sure-handed — casual and sure-handed being about as good a combination as artistry, in any medium, has to offer.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    The film has two big things going for it: Stanfield and Asomugha. Their characters could easily become capital-letter caricatures — Victim, Loyal Friend — but the actors give Warner and King a sense of personality, and deeply felt hurt, that stays with you.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    Mostly people talk. Lovely to look at, In Transit is even better to listen to. The documentary tells us straightaway that what we hear matters just as much as what we see.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Ingrid Goes West doesn’t offer Plaza a breakout role so much as a dig-deeper role. There’s a bravery to her performance that recalls De Niro as Pupkin. Actors really, really like to be liked — and understood. Ingrid is intensely unlikable — and opaque.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    New York looks very appealing: uptown, downtown, even the little bit of Brooklyn we see. Think of “Boy” as a Bridges highlight reel and Gotham travelogue, instead of precious coming-of-age story, and it’s not half bad. But it isn’t, so it is.

Top Trailers