Leah Greenblatt

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For 286 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 87% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 11% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Leah Greenblatt's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 76
Highest review score: 100 Beasts of No Nation
Lowest review score: 33 Dirty Grandpa
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 1 out of 286
286 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Most of Fighting’s narrative moves are as choreographed as any undercard match — and the outcome as clearly forecast — but the tears brought on by the movie’s last ten minutes of rhinestoned Rocky triumph taste salty, and real.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Leah Greenblatt
    It’s mostly left to Rodriguez to carry the absurdity on her shoulders, and the fact that she makes it so watchable is a real testament to her abilities. Next time, may the material rise at least halfway to meet her.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 67 Leah Greenblatt
    Thieves feels oddly joyless — a mostly rote perp walk through the mechanics of unarmed robbery, sprinkled with occasional slapped-on signifiers of fun (wild camera angles, snazzy soundtrack, smash-cut flashbacks to Swinging London).
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Penna’s concept is hardly new, but his execution is sharp, clean, and smartly paced; a harrowing postcard from the void.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 42 Leah Greenblatt
    Åkerlund — the Swedish mastermind behind tastemaking music videos for the likes of Beyoncé, Lady Gaga, and Taylor Swift — has jittery, high-gloss style to spare. But the primary-colored nihilism of his storytelling feels amateurish and ultimately exhausting; a gleefully unhinged teenage-boy dream that aims only for hard, shiny surfaces, and stays there.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    For a lot of its runtime, Velvet is fun and silly and enjoyably outrageous. It’s hard, though, to walk away with a real sense of anything more than blood on the canvas and a blank where your feelings — beyond mild bemusement, and a sudden appetite for prime Los Angeles real estate — should be.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    The movie is more than a bonfire of the inanities; it’s a shrewd indictment of a dream gone spectacularly, criminally wrong.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 67 Leah Greenblatt
    The racial politics feel almost willfully retro, but the actors’ charisma cuts through: Forced to work strictly from the neck up, Cranston is just the right amount of gruff; Hart, aside from a deeply unnecessary catheter scene, gives a gratifyingly prickly and vulnerable performance. Somewhere beneath this passable-enough Upside, there’s a better, sharper movie for them both.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    What’s fun is just watching Lopez and her supporting cast — including her real-life best friend Remini, Tony winner Annaleigh Ashford as her tightly wound coworker, and a loopy Charlyne Yi as her phobic new assistant — move through the scenes so easily.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    The shrewd, relentless winkiness of McKay’s filmmaking style may have worked better, though, for breaking down subprime mortgages in The Big Short than it does chronicling a deadly misbegotten war. What remains then is the cipher at the center of Vice: the Man Who Wasn’t There, and probably never will be.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    John Cena is top billed, and though his brick-jawed military man doesn’t actually get many scenes, he does get a disproportionate share of the script’s best lines. He gives good muscle, but Bumblebee brings something even more important — and actually transforming — to the series: a sense of humor, and a heart.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Spoonfuls of sugar always help the movie magic go down; if only this Mary had gotten a necessary twist of lemon, too.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    As Bird time-jumps between the claustrophobic action of the house and a desperate sort of jailbreak, director Susanne Bier (The Night Manager) keeps the mood taut and defiantly in the moment.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    What keeps the film from feeling like period-piece amber, all whispered alliances and wiggery, is the keenly feminist sensibility of first-time director Josie Rourke (her background is largely in theater) and the fierce charisma and complicated humanity of its two leads, sovereigns till the end.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Kids could still watch the peerless 1966 original, though their blooming little cortexes will probably respond to the shiny-bright novelty here — and be newly spellbound by a tale almost as old as color television, but still evergreen.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    In a world that seems to get uglier every day, this movie’s gentle heart and mere humanity feel like a salve.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 58 Leah Greenblatt
    It’s entertaining enough for popcorn — and gratifying, too, to watch these smart, strong women step into roles they’re so often left to support from the sidelines, while men have all the contraband fun. If only the execution of it didn’t feel like such a crazy-quilt patchwork of other, better films, and so jaggedly stitched together.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    Kore-eda is working up to something else, steering the story he’s built so carefully toward an utterly unexpected detour. As much of what we think we know unravels, the film becomes not just an enjoyable, intermittently poignant portrait of imperfect people but a profound meditation on the meaning of family.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    If Eternity is hardly a completist portrait — or even a narratively satisfying one, really — it’s still gratifying to watch in other ways. Not just for the pureness of Dafoe’s performance but for the way it lets art be both celebrated and unexplained, still as much a mystery as the man who made it.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Leah Greenblatt
    There might not be a more gorgeous-looking movie this year than Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Leah Greenblatt
    Maybe unavoidably, the movie that’s emerged from all that has the distinct whiff of compromise and art by committee — the opposite, in other words, of nearly everything Queen’s flamboyant, defiant frontman stood for.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    By the time the narrative comes to Colvin’s greatest get — she was essentially the first Western journalist to get inside Homs and refute Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s bold-faced lie that he wasn’t bombing his own people into oblivion — the price of that sacrifice, and the power of her story, feels finally, fully real. Whatever her private battles, War works hard to be the public reckoning her work deserves.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    He (Hill) makes Mid90s resonate with universal poignancy and electric energy; his kids are the best, messiest kind of real, and they’re alright.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    It’s British stage actress Erivo who feels like the real star. Her steely charisma and gorgeous powerhouse of a voice (Goddard takes every plausible opportunity to let her loose on a classic 1960s songbook; can you blame him?) is what gives the movie not just a different kind of heroine, but a heart.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Gyllenhaal, bright-eyed and brittle, brings her signature intensity to the role, though Lisa’s true inner world remains murky; it’s never quite clear if she’s just deeply unhappy or certifiably ill. Instead, the movie remains an intriguing but ambiguous portrait of a flawed, fascinating woman who knows herself either too well or not at all
    • 42 Metascore
    • 67 Leah Greenblatt
    Escobar’s story hardly lacks for plot points, and director Fernando León de Aronaoa (Mondays in the Sun) hits them all obligingly, if broadly. What he doesn’t carve out much room for is richer character motivations or context.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Reinaldo Marcus Green’s quiet drama still carries its own kind of big stick, even if the story’s impact is ultimately muffled by his meditative, low-key style.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Smallfoot has its own silly, beastie charm.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    There’s a kinetic energy in Levinson’s telling, and real catharsis in a riotous final sequence that feels all the more triumphant for the unlikeliness of such a bloody, happy ending.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    As the tone wobbles between absurdity and tragedy, it also starts to shift toward something deeper and more bittersweet than mere midlife ennui. A lot of that is down to Mendelsohn, an actor who seems born to embody Holofocener’s kind of hero: weary and wounded but still putting it out there, a beautiful mess in progress.

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