Leah Greenblatt

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For 308 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 87% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 12% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Leah Greenblatt's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 76
Highest review score: 100 Beasts of No Nation
Lowest review score: 33 Dirty Grandpa
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 1 out of 308
308 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Egerton’s whole-body commitment captures not just Elton’s outrageous physicality — in costume designer Julian Day’s hands, he’s essentially a one-man Mardi Gras — but his enduring sadness and insecurity (and the self-sabotaging behavior it was too often funneled through) without tipping into showbiz-tragedy cliché. He’s the starry-eyed cosmonaut the part demands, but merely, endearingly mortal too.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    If the storyline doesn’t so much unfold as burst out in glittery puffs — and if music cues seem to make up about 40 percent of the plot—it’s still an endearing kind of chaos.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    The story casts a spell, and Swinton Byrne is a milky, beguiling presence; it’s almost as if you’re watching her become a person in real time.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Leah Greenblatt
    The leads are both charming, but they can’t override the tooth-aching sincerity of the script, or the cardboard conflicts that propel it.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    As the story unfolds over nearly a decade, Biggest becomes something even more impactful: a thoughtful and often profoundly moving portrait of the remarkable work involved in producing mindful food — and an eloquent reminder that so much of what we take for granted on our plates is, in its own everyday way, a miracle.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Leah Greenblatt
    There are a few legitimately great throwaway lines, and a few vaguely offensive ones. But the movie feels so fast and cheap that it’s hard not to wonder why they’ve made it at all, other than to jump on a small and so-far underwhelming trend in gender-swapping ‘80s remakes (see also: Ghostbusters, Overboard).
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    What makes it more than a slick impersonation of sociopathy, though, is the layers he peels — Bundy’s desperation, his endless calculations and longing for connection. He also has some great interplay with John Malkovich, as the Tallahassee judge who engages in a sort of folksy, combative back-and-forth with him in court that nearly verges on buddy comedy.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Leah Greenblatt
    The whole thing would be more fun, you start to feel, if Intruder just committed fully to the schlocky midnight-movie glory of it all; let Quaid’s lawn-mowing wingnut swing that ax not just for soft vulnerable body parts, but the stars.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    Officially, Knock follows four progressive female candidates, though the one who inevitably dominates is Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the Bronx-bred waitress–turned–congressional unicorn. It’s a lot of fun to ride along on her wildly improbable rise, from slinging margaritas and scooping out ice buckets to taking down one of the most powerful Democrats in the House.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    The movie largely delivers, splashing its ambitious three-hour narrative across a sprawling canvas of characters, eras, and not-quite-insurmountable challenges.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Mbatha-Raw brings a fierce, quiet containment to the lead role, and Hart builds so much mood through her atmospheric cinematography and deliberately slow pacing that it nearly papers over the sketched-in quality of the script. Eventually, though, you start to wish her characters would speak in more than just vague koans and disaster-movie platitudes.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    If shrewd one-liners and small moments ultimately override the episodic narrative, Someone‘s takeaway — that love is a messy-splendored thing, and “happily ever after” is just a story that hasn’t finished yet — feels refreshing modern and true.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Why end a rallying cry with a question mark? The devil is in the details, or at least in the punctuation of Hail Satan?, a movie that often seems to teeter on the line between doc- and mockumentary — a sincere examination of a social and political movement delivered with just a soupçon of Christopher Guest.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    The script’s second half drifts, going too soft on teachable moments, but Little still finds its loopy sweet spot: Tom Hanks’ "Big" flipped and recast as pure black-girl magic.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 58 Leah Greenblatt
    What it does have at the center is an actress who commits completely to the mess, even if Perry never quite deigns to show us the underlying talent that might justify her terrible behavior — or at least the loyalty of the countless friends, fans, and enablers who suffer the brunt of it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    It all goes down easily if not exactly unforgettably; a wispy slice of hirsute whimsy.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    The result is a candy-coated, willfully quirky wisp of a film; like a Michel Gondry fantasy dipped in glitter and rainbow sprinkles.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Us
    Fans of Get Out, Peele’s brilliant, mind-bending 2017 debut, may feel vaguely let down that his follow-up is, for all of its sly humor and high style, a fairly straightforward genre piece, and that its bigger ideas and metaphors don’t feel quite fully baked.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    Moore — vulnerable but undauntable — lives every moment in her skin, fantastic to the last glorious frame.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    The phrase “low-key thriller” might be an oxymoron, but it also feels like the best description of The Wedding Guest.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Leah Greenblatt
    A loony psychodrama so steeped in winking, twinkly-toed camp that it almost (almost!) escapes the leaden tropes of the genre.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    First-time feature filmmaker Laure de Clermont-Tonnerre brings a gorgeous, wide-open sparseness to her visual storytelling (it makes sense that Robert Redford, the original Sundance Kid, is listed as an executive producer), but it’s largely Schoenaerts’ movie to carry.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Most of Fighting’s narrative moves are as choreographed as any undercard match — and the outcome as clearly forecast — but the tears brought on by the movie’s last ten minutes of rhinestoned Rocky triumph taste salty, and real.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Leah Greenblatt
    It’s mostly left to Rodriguez to carry the absurdity on her shoulders, and the fact that she makes it so watchable is a real testament to her abilities. Next time, may the material rise at least halfway to meet her.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 67 Leah Greenblatt
    Thieves feels oddly joyless — a mostly rote perp walk through the mechanics of unarmed robbery, sprinkled with occasional slapped-on signifiers of fun (wild camera angles, snazzy soundtrack, smash-cut flashbacks to Swinging London).
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Penna’s concept is hardly new, but his execution is sharp, clean, and smartly paced; a harrowing postcard from the void.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 42 Leah Greenblatt
    Åkerlund — the Swedish mastermind behind tastemaking music videos for the likes of Beyoncé, Lady Gaga, and Taylor Swift — has jittery, high-gloss style to spare. But the primary-colored nihilism of his storytelling feels amateurish and ultimately exhausting; a gleefully unhinged teenage-boy dream that aims only for hard, shiny surfaces, and stays there.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    For a lot of its runtime, Velvet is fun and silly and enjoyably outrageous. It’s hard, though, to walk away with a real sense of anything more than blood on the canvas and a blank where your feelings — beyond mild bemusement, and a sudden appetite for prime Los Angeles real estate — should be.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    The movie is more than a bonfire of the inanities; it’s a shrewd indictment of a dream gone spectacularly, criminally wrong.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 67 Leah Greenblatt
    The racial politics feel almost willfully retro, but the actors’ charisma cuts through: Forced to work strictly from the neck up, Cranston is just the right amount of gruff; Hart, aside from a deeply unnecessary catheter scene, gives a gratifyingly prickly and vulnerable performance. Somewhere beneath this passable-enough Upside, there’s a better, sharper movie for them both.

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