Leah Greenblatt

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For 269 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 85% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 12% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 12.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Leah Greenblatt's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 76
Highest review score: 100 The Hunting Ground
Lowest review score: 33 Dirty Grandpa
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 1 out of 269
269 movie reviews
    • 93 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    Kore-eda is working up to something else, steering the story he’s built so carefully toward an utterly unexpected detour. As much of what we think we know unravels, the film becomes not just an enjoyable, intermittently poignant portrait of imperfect people but a profound meditation on the meaning of family.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    If Eternity is hardly a completist portrait — or even a narratively satisfying one, really — it’s still gratifying to watch in other ways. Not just for the pureness of Dafoe’s performance but for the way it lets art be both celebrated and unexplained, still as much a mystery as the man who made it.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Leah Greenblatt
    There might not be a more gorgeous-looking movie this year than Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Leah Greenblatt
    Maybe unavoidably, the movie that’s emerged from all that has the distinct whiff of compromise and art by committee — the opposite, in other words, of nearly everything Queen’s flamboyant, defiant frontman stood for.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    By the time the narrative comes to Colvin’s greatest get — she was essentially the first Western journalist to get inside Homs and refute Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s bold-faced lie that he wasn’t bombing his own people into oblivion — the price of that sacrifice, and the power of her story, feels finally, fully real. Whatever her private battles, War works hard to be the public reckoning her work deserves.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    He (Hill) makes Mid90s resonate with universal poignancy and electric energy; his kids are the best, messiest kind of real, and they’re alright.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    It’s British stage actress Erivo who feels like the real star. Her steely charisma and gorgeous powerhouse of a voice (Goddard takes every plausible opportunity to let her loose on a classic 1960s songbook; can you blame him?) is what gives the movie not just a different kind of heroine, but a heart.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Gyllenhaal, bright-eyed and brittle, brings her signature intensity to the role, though Lisa’s true inner world remains murky; it’s never quite clear if she’s just deeply unhappy or certifiably ill. Instead, the movie remains an intriguing but ambiguous portrait of a flawed, fascinating woman who knows herself either too well or not at all
    • 42 Metascore
    • 67 Leah Greenblatt
    Escobar’s story hardly lacks for plot points, and director Fernando León de Aronaoa (Mondays in the Sun) hits them all obligingly, if broadly. What he doesn’t carve out much room for is richer character motivations or context.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Reinaldo Marcus Green’s quiet drama still carries its own kind of big stick, even if the story’s impact is ultimately muffled by his meditative, low-key style.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Smallfoot has its own silly, beastie charm.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    There’s a kinetic energy in Levinson’s telling, and real catharsis in a riotous final sequence that feels all the more triumphant for the unlikeliness of such a bloody, happy ending.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    As the tone wobbles between absurdity and tragedy, it also starts to shift toward something deeper and more bittersweet than mere midlife ennui. A lot of that is down to Mendelsohn, an actor who seems born to embody Holofocener’s kind of hero: weary and wounded but still putting it out there, a beautiful mess in progress.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Leah Greenblatt
    Kidman, to her credit, goes all in, but it’s hard to ignore the neon sign over her head that keeps flashing “See? I’m Acting!”
    • 87 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Can You Ever Forgive Me?’s premise is so low-key outrageous, it would almost have to be true. And it is: a shaggy, endearingly dour portrait of the kind of true-life eccentric New York hardly seems to make anymore.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Sisters gets sadder and more eccentric as it goes along, and the ending actually tugs sweetly on a few heart strings, though it’s also hard not to wonder why exactly, with all the Westerns already in the cannon, this movie got made — other than to give its crew of excellent actors a chance to put on their boots and ride off, cock-eyed and whimsical, into some kind of sunset.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Director Paul Weitz is mostly known for lighter, more observational stories like "About a Boy" and "Mozart in the Jungle," and the strongest moments in Bel Canto are the small ones.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    In some ways Beale feels less like a movie than a well-staged, meticulously shot play; a period piece that floats beyond its specific time and place and into the realm of allegory.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    If Tillman ties it all together a little neatly, he’s already served up a message that feels too fresh and important to dismiss — not of hate but of hope, and faith that even if sharing these stories can’t magically fix what’s broken, telling them still matters.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Long live Michael Myers, so maybe someone can finally kill him — in a big, funny, scary, squishy, super-meta sequel that brings it all back to the iconic 1978 original.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Beautiful Boy keeps you strung on that line for nearly all of its run time, and sometimes it feels less like a movie than an endurance test — one that’s lovingly, meticulously made but almost too much like real life: an impressionistic series of highs and lows, relapses and recoveries, without the necessary anchor of a cohesive arc.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Mackenzie falls a little too in love with his battle scenes; by the fourth clash of blood and swords it all starts to feel like déjà vu, with different horses. At nearly two and a half hours, there’s clearly room to trim.... But he also films it beautifully in the natural light of candles, torches, and overcast skies, and there’s a solidness to the old-fashioned conventions of his storytelling.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    It’s Cooper, in his directing debut, who ultimately has to carry the film from both sides.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 58 Leah Greenblatt
    The script, by writer-director Victor Levin (Survivor’s Remorse, Mad About You) comes on like a rom-com David Mamet freight train; its verbal turns are so wildly overwritten that all the actors can really do is hold on to the wheel well, racing through reams of ratatat dialogue. But Ryder and Reeves surrender to it gamely, and sprinkle a sort of movie-star pixie dust over the too-muchness of the text.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Even the cast’s uniform excellence can’t quite crack Children’s outer carapace, or bring full life to Fiona’s emotional struggle as she’s forced to confront her own failings. Instead the story drifts iceberg-like toward its carefully muted conclusion, only a small part of its true scope visible above a beautiful, chilly surface.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    To see a black female over 40 holding the center of a story about ordinary, unsung lives makes Support a low-key pleasure; one that transcends its own shaggy narrative.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Welsh actor Pryce (Game of Thrones) is fantastic — a fussy, adulterous egoist in the Great Man mold of Norman Mailer or Philip Roth, with his own touchingly real frailties. But the movie belongs to Close, whose face, as she is courted and patronized, sexually betrayed and damned with faint praise, is a marvel of emotional intelligence and control.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Much like the book, the plot is essentially a wisp, and Byrne is far too luminous for her sad-sack role. But Juliet still feels winning; the small, sweet grace note on a familiar melody.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Shot by cinematographer Shabier Kirchner in hazy, endless-summer half-light, Kitchen finds a kind of urban poetry in the swooping parabolas of the skate park and the rumbling scrape of wheels on pavement.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    If the storyline is strictly something old and borrowed, though, a peek at the crazy-rich rainbow of Asian experience — even one as razzle-dazzlingly too-much as this one — feels not just new, but way overdue.

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