Leah Greenblatt

Select another critic »
For 226 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 87% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 11% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 12.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Leah Greenblatt's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 75
Highest review score: 100 The Hunting Ground
Lowest review score: 33 Dirty Grandpa
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 1 out of 226
226 movie reviews
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    A dizzy, fizzy comedy with occasional flashes of real wit.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Subtle it is not; Strangelove can feel aggressively self-aware, nouveau John Hughes with a pocket full of f-bombs and carefully worked one-liners.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Writer-director Drew Pearce must have done something right to get a cast like this to sign on for what is essentially a loving, highly stylized homage to the kind of camp apocalyptia John Carpenter used to make; the only thing missing here is an Ernest Borgnine cameo and Kurt Russell scowling in an eye patch.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Ocean’s 8’s girls-just-wanna-have-grand-larceny conceit is the kind of starry, high-gloss goof the summer movie season was made for, even if it feels lightweight by the already zero-gravity standards of the genre.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 67 Leah Greenblatt
    What saves it is the casting (Fanning especially is fantastic, both winsome and wonderfully strange) and Mitchell’s obvious fondness for his milieu. His giddy, knowingly camp direction has a sort of glitter-stick DIY spirit that keeps the movie aloft long after the story itself has run out of road.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    A movie seemingly custom-made for the era of alternative facts, American Animals feels like a new kind of true-crime thriller: one that shamelessly rewrites its truths in real time as it goes.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    In an industry that defines “mature audiences” as anyone old enough to vote, a movie centered entirely on women over 65 — a sex comedy, no less — feels like some kind of small Hollywood miracle.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Director Dominic Cooke is mostly known for his Olivier Award-winning theater work, but Chesil never feels stagey or static. It’s beautifully shot, and he pulls lovely performances from both his leads.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    It’s in Deadpool’s DNA to channel the wild id of a 12-year-old boy — a very clever one who happens to love boobs, Enya, and blowing stuff up. Which is dizzy fun for a while, like eating Twinkies on a Gravitron. Eventually, though, it just wears you out.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Its title sounds like the premise for some kind of high-adrenaline adventure about maze-running or outgunning a nuclear apocalypse. But The Escape is both less thrilling and much scarier, in its own way — a quiet domestic-drama chamber piece with a vein of pure desperation thrumming beneath it.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    A charming and generally painless way to spend two hours. It’s not nearly as sharp as some of the best stuff she’s done, but it’s pointedly kinder too, wrapping even its nastiest characters.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Leah Greenblatt
    The story works well enough in its own moodily familiar way, but it’s not only the movie’s palette that’s stylishly leached of color: Its main characters’ backstories feel perfunctory, the dialogue leans heavy on exposition and hard-boiled cliché, and even Owen looks worn down.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 58 Leah Greenblatt
    Overboard lists and wanders through the shoals of secondhand comedy and eventually, just drifts away.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    RBG
    RBG is an unapologetic valentine to Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, but a sharp and spiky one too.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    If the film itself feels like a little less than the sum of its provocative premise, it’s still moving in its own unshowy way: a quietly profound exploration of identity, sacrifice, and the connection all human beings long for, whether or not their God or their family or their community approves.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 58 Leah Greenblatt
    Kodachrome isn’t a bad movie, it just never for a moment feels like a real one: A road-trip dramedy so schematic and loaded for emotional bear it feels like it was generated by a Sundance screenwriting app.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 58 Leah Greenblatt
    There’s also something depressing about Schumer playing off her own looks as if, without the abracadabra of her bonked-head delusions, she were some sort of hideous gremlin. Magician, heal thyself.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    Pete is no kind of fairytale; instead, it’s something far sadder and better and more real.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    A clever, sharp-fanged mélange of classic midnight-movie horror and modern indie ingenuity.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Ejiofor’s performance make the movie; the rest, you may just have to take on faith.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    The performances are strong and the story is absorbing; a smart diversion for adult attention spans.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    What the movie doesn’t do, until it’s nearly over, is make any real case for why so much of America continued to put their faith in Kennedy long after the facts of the case were revealed.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    When A Quiet Place has one finger on the panic button and the other on mute, it’s a nervy, terrifying thrill.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 58 Leah Greenblatt
    All style and mood, signifying not much.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    The movie’s darker allegory of persecution and internment isn’t hard to miss, though, and the dogs themselves, with their tactile tufts of fur and Buster Keaton eyes, have an endearing, complicated humanity.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    There’s some real, weird fun in secondary characters like Tony Hale’s desperate-to-be-down principal, Natasha Rothwell’s exasperated drama teacher, and Logan Miller’s Martin, a theater kid so eager to please he practically turns himself inside out.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Uthaug also manages to work in a few genuinely cool visual tricks, though the dialogue, from a serviceable script by Geneva Robertson-Dworet and Alastair Siddons is strictly standard; a mix of clunky action-movie exposition and winking Indiana Jones-style humor.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Despite the rich settings and crowded cast, the film can’t help feeling a little airless too: These players aren’t history’s masterminds, they’re wasps trapped in a jar, bumbling against the glass in sting-or-be-stung chaos.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    What begins as a gleefully nasty piece of work gradually picks up more nuance as it goes, adding dimensions to characters who could easily have coasted on the story’s arched-eyebrow burlesque.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    It’s the kind of film that leaves you dazzled and a little shell-shocked — and not entirely sure whether your own moviegoing DNA hasn’t been altered a little in the process.

Top Trailers