Leah Greenblatt

Select another critic »
For 242 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 87% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 11% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 12.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Leah Greenblatt's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 75
Highest review score: 100 The Hunting Ground
Lowest review score: 33 Dirty Grandpa
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 1 out of 242
242 movie reviews
    • 58 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Much like the book, the plot is essentially a wisp, and Byrne is far too luminous for her sad-sack role. But Juliet still feels winning; the small, sweet grace note on a familiar melody.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Shot by cinematographer Shabier Kirchner in hazy, endless-summer half-light, Kitchen finds a kind of urban poetry in the swooping parabolas of the skate park and the rumbling scrape of wheels on pavement.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    If the storyline is strictly something old and borrowed, though, a peek at the crazy-rich rainbow of Asian experience — even one as razzle-dazzlingly too-much as this one — feels not just new, but way overdue.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Madeline is the kind of movie that won’t come anywhere near the mainstream, and clearly wasn’t meant to. But for the dozens of viewers it will almost certainly baffle or exasperate, there will be one or two completely captured by its peculiar magic.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Leah Greenblatt
    Forster (Finding Neverland, World War Z) never quite finds the alchemy in Milne’s timeless tales, or the melancholy sweetness of his being-and-nothingness koans. Instead it’s just an earnest tribute, tastefully faithful to the source — and flatter, somehow, than the story ever was on the page.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    The movie’s arc is too conventional by half, but the appeal of the two main actors keeps it (sorry) afloat, maybe more than it should.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Director Marc Turtletaub pulls thoughtful, carefully shaded performances from Denman, Khan, and, most of all, Scottish actress Macdonald (Boardwalk Empire, No Country for Old Men), who refuses to let Agnes be an easy avatar for midlife longing and suburban discontent.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 58 Leah Greenblatt
    Bynum shoots it all in high pop-pastiche style, with a near-constant barrage of neon freeze frames, slow-pan party shots, and romantic montages set to an eclectic, decade-spanning soundtrack (Tarzan Boy, David Bowie, Roxette, Suicide).
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    If McQueen feels like it’s missing some deeper insights, it may be because its subject kept so much of himself hidden from even the people who loved him most.... What’s left is a fascinating if incomplete portrait of genius interrupted — and a life that should have lasted much longer than it did.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    Kimberly Reed’s taut documentary is also damning, clear-eyed, and as gripping as any John Grisham thriller.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    A shiny-bright jukebox musical with a heart of gold and a plot of pure polyester, Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again works hard to be the feel-giddy movie experience of the summer. And it mostly succeeds in its own glittery, aggressively winsome way.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Eventually, it’s Wealth‘s inherent too-muchness that undoes its own best intentions.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Woman could use some of the quieter character nuance of a movie like last year’s "Wind River," another fact-based drama that reflected the struggle of indigenous people with a sensitive, unvarnished kind of naturalism; White’s well-meant version is undoubtedly incomplete, and gilded with a certain amount of Hollywood silliness.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    Whitney feels like the kind of film anyone who cared at all about her should see: the fullest portrait yet — if one that will always, inevitably fall short — of a singular artist and human being who may have eluded understanding in the end, but still gave the world far more than she ever got back.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    By trading in all its intrigue and emotional subtleties for the gotcha moment it’s clearly been waiting for, Tree wins the battle but loses the war.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 67 Leah Greenblatt
    It all bumps along, as road trips do, through silliness and boredom and occasional, unexpected charm. But Feste’s story never really gets the rhythms right, and Boundaries finally reaches the end of the road, feeling like nothing so much as a missed opportunity.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    A dizzy, fizzy comedy with occasional flashes of real wit.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Subtle it is not; Strangelove can feel aggressively self-aware, nouveau John Hughes with a pocket full of f-bombs and carefully worked one-liners.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Writer-director Drew Pearce must have done something right to get a cast like this to sign on for what is essentially a loving, highly stylized homage to the kind of camp apocalyptia John Carpenter used to make; the only thing missing here is an Ernest Borgnine cameo and Kurt Russell scowling in an eye patch.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Ocean’s 8’s girls-just-wanna-have-grand-larceny conceit is the kind of starry, high-gloss goof the summer movie season was made for, even if it feels lightweight by the already zero-gravity standards of the genre.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 67 Leah Greenblatt
    What saves it is the casting (Fanning especially is fantastic, both winsome and wonderfully strange) and Mitchell’s obvious fondness for his milieu. His giddy, knowingly camp direction has a sort of glitter-stick DIY spirit that keeps the movie aloft long after the story itself has run out of road.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    A movie seemingly custom-made for the era of alternative facts, American Animals feels like a new kind of true-crime thriller: one that shamelessly rewrites its truths in real time as it goes.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    In an industry that defines “mature audiences” as anyone old enough to vote, a movie centered entirely on women over 65 — a sex comedy, no less — feels like some kind of small Hollywood miracle.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Director Dominic Cooke is mostly known for his Olivier Award-winning theater work, but Chesil never feels stagey or static. It’s beautifully shot, and he pulls lovely performances from both his leads.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    It’s in Deadpool’s DNA to channel the wild id of a 12-year-old boy — a very clever one who happens to love boobs, Enya, and blowing stuff up. Which is dizzy fun for a while, like eating Twinkies on a Gravitron. Eventually, though, it just wears you out.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Its title sounds like the premise for some kind of high-adrenaline adventure about maze-running or outgunning a nuclear apocalypse. But The Escape is both less thrilling and much scarier, in its own way — a quiet domestic-drama chamber piece with a vein of pure desperation thrumming beneath it.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    A charming and generally painless way to spend two hours. It’s not nearly as sharp as some of the best stuff she’s done, but it’s pointedly kinder too, wrapping even its nastiest characters.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Leah Greenblatt
    The story works well enough in its own moodily familiar way, but it’s not only the movie’s palette that’s stylishly leached of color: Its main characters’ backstories feel perfunctory, the dialogue leans heavy on exposition and hard-boiled cliché, and even Owen looks worn down.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 58 Leah Greenblatt
    Overboard lists and wanders through the shoals of secondhand comedy and eventually, just drifts away.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    RBG
    RBG is an unapologetic valentine to Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, but a sharp and spiky one too.

Top Trailers