For 208 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 59% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kate Erbland's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 91 To the Bone
Lowest review score: 16 The Vanishing Of Sidney Hall
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 28 out of 208
208 movie reviews
    • 56 Metascore
    • 42 Kate Erbland
    When it works, it’s never better than a loving retread of the pleasures of the first film; when it doesn’t, it’s a head-scratcher of the highest order, a film that exists to push forward a franchise that seems to have already lost its way.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 83 Kate Erbland
    Every trope, twist, and trick of the genre is up for skewering in the comedy, but the film keeps things light and smart, never dipping into darkness or crass jokes. It’s funny because it’s clever, but it’s also never cruel.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 67 Kate Erbland
    The film is littered with jump scares, but most of them offer up shocking twists that land with genuine payoff: the score winds up, the framing gets tighter, the shots linger for longer, and when a different film might serve up a jump scare with a giddy “oh, it was nothing!” laugh, The Prodigy delivers something truly distressing.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Kate Erbland
    At least there’s Slate, who gamely approaches her character with sensitivity and care (the actress also produced the project) and keeps Frances grounded even as The Sunlit Night sputters around her.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 Kate Erbland
    Late Night smartly sends up not just the cloistered world of late night television, but a current cultural climate struggling to evolve in a changing world.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Erbland
    Knock Down the House takes its viewers on the inside of a propulsive movement that’s changing by the moment, an energetic look inside history as its being made, even when the results aren’t always the ones that are so fervently hoped for.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Kate Erbland
    The typical trappings of a reflective documentary about a larger-than-life star are all there, from nods to the weight of stardom and how political leanings can both help and harm a talent on the rise, but they’re made bigger and richer because it’s Crosby who is acknowledging them, unblinking.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 83 Kate Erbland
    More sad than salacious, it’s the rare film about a criminal that offers human details without humanizing a man who so many agree was a monster.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Kate Erbland
    Colaizzo’s script weaves in enough detail to explain some of Brittany’s demons, but Bell sells the tough stuff too, doing more with a cautious look in the mirror and a slow smile than other performers can do with an Oscar-ready speech.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Erbland
    Grainger and Shawkat are wonderful together, conveying the depth of a 10-year relationship with affection and honesty.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Kate Erbland
    The beats of Fighting With My Family are comfortingly familiar, and the soap opera pomp of the wrestling world is eye-popping to both fans and neophytes alike, but it’s Pugh that is always fresh, surprising, and wily. The film might not hit hard, but Pugh never stops doing just that.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Erbland
    Egg
    Egg shows the Scottish actor-director’s continuing ability to ground her films with strong character work and a buoyant sense of humor.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Kate Erbland
    Perfect Strangers takes too much time to get to its big game — nearly its full first act is consumed by introductions and set dressing, most of it unnecessary, considering how believable the group’s chemistry is — but once it kicks into gear, the effect is dizzying.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 58 Kate Erbland
    For all its of-the-moment charms, Escape Room can’t shake its more basic genre trappings, eventually giving itself over to tired and predictable revelations and flimsy twists.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 58 Kate Erbland
    Second Act never recovers from its big reveal, a cataclysmic (and nearly catastrophic) piece of narrative nuttiness that derails every scene, every performance, every subsequent revelation.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 33 Kate Erbland
    It's all a shell of itself, with Fred Savage on hand to occasionally note how weird this all is.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Erbland
    Lessons about loving oneself, accepting one’s faults, and being the best version of yourself are cheesy, but not without purpose. Call it cinematic comfort food, but Dumplin' knows how to satisfy.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Kate Erbland
    Despite that iffy start, Garver’s film blossoms into something more comprehensive than complimentary, a film that doesn’t balk at the trickier aspects of Kael’s career, even as it never fully engages with the tensions that informed her.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 58 Kate Erbland
    For every scene of dazzling wonder, there’s another of outsized horror; for every big cat who looks ready to jump off the screen, there’s a wolf that appears bizarrely unfinished. There is little middle ground.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Kate Erbland
    Younger audiences will surely benefit from its messaging, but with such vivid characters it’s entertaining and emotional for all ages.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 58 Kate Erbland
    As impressive as the final showdown is (it’s easily one of the most impressive setpieces in this fledgling franchise) and as shocking as the film’s closing revelations are (yes, they really are), this magic needs a spell of its own.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Kate Erbland
    While the particular brand of art that Meow Wolf crafts isn’t for everyone — audiences uninterested in participatory experiences may very well be turned off by the film’s synopsis alone — the story at the heart of “Origin Story” is universal.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 58 Kate Erbland
    Lisbeth is never going to be cuddly or sunny, but that doesn’t mean she has to be robotic or impossible to read. That’s something that Foy and Alvarez clearly understand, and the result is a heroine not only worth cheering for, but one worth loving and even understanding.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Kate Erbland
    The creativity may be lacking in other areas, but “Goosebumps 2” steps up the creature feature quotient with style and smarts.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 58 Kate Erbland
    Schloss compellingly combines the rangy wildness of hormonal teenagehood with Sadie’s more terrifying instincts, toeing the line between pissed-off teen and possible psychopath with ease. Her Sadie is both brutally dead-eyed and weirdly charismatic; you simply can’t turn away from her, even when you really, really want to.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 42 Kate Erbland
    While there’s certainly room to explore Alcott’s biggest themes in the lives of modern women, here the results feel more hammy than revelatory.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 25 Kate Erbland
    Life Itself thinks you’re stupid. Or, if not stupid, unable to understand how a movie should work. It’s a movie made for people who can’t be trusted to understand any storytelling unless it’s not just spoon-fed but ladled on, piled high, and explained via montage and voiceover.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Kate Erbland
    It’s a film that contains multitudes, and only asks for a world willing to do the same.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Erbland
    It opens as a stilted, awkward drama, complete with the always-delightful Maika Monroe giving literal voice to what appears to be the film’s obvious theme (mommy issues, basically) — and then it takes a surprising flip.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 58 Kate Erbland
    Feig goes for the spaghetti method of storytelling: Throw a whole bunch of stuff at the wall and something has got to stick. Only some does, but the good stuff — the really campy, trashy, nutty stuff — is the kind of thing popcorn cinema hasn’t so happily embraced in years.

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