For 222 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 59% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kate Erbland's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 91 Miss Sharon Jones!
Lowest review score: 16 The Vanishing Of Sidney Hall
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 28 out of 222
222 movie reviews
    • 45 Metascore
    • 58 Kate Erbland
    The film’s bent towards revisionist superhero history is certainly compelling, but stuck in the confines of the horror genre, it flames out far more than it flies.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Kate Erbland
    Smith puts on such an outsized performance that it’s easy for him to overshadow its smaller joys — and when Genie is suddenly silenced in a limp third act, the entire film suffers.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 58 Kate Erbland
    When The Hustle succeeds — in fits and starts, and with occasional big laughs — it’s wholly thanks to the dedication of Hathaway and Wilson, who throw themselves into thinly written roles (the film somehow required four screenwriters) that they spice up by bringing their A-game to material that’s beneath them.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Kate Erbland
    It seems that this particular game of Pokémon needed more time at the gym. Yes, that’s a “Pokémon Go” reference, and if you can’t follow it, don’t bother.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Kate Erbland
    A maddeningly shallow look at Ronstadt’s remarkable life.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Kate Erbland
    The results are fascinating, weird, and often quite moving.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 58 Kate Erbland
    A strange, bifurcated tale of love and espionage, with Judi Dench stuck in a thankless role that does nothing to capitalize on her talents. The film is worse for it.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Kate Erbland
    The wit of Robinson’s series still occasionally peeks out in Someone Great, especially when her central trio are interacting, but smushed into a 92-minute running time, little of the best bits can actually breathe.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Erbland
    With Penguins, frequent Disneynature filmmaker Alastair Fothergill and franchise newbie Jeff Wilson are working in a more minor key than such essential entries as Chimpanzee and African Cats, but the artistry and relative magic of the series is still on full display.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 42 Kate Erbland
    There are bigger questions to ask here, but when it’s easier to roll out some simple images and wrapped-up answers, Breakthrough breaks down, happy to just explain away everything good as a divine act that no one could possibly control. Movies, however, require a bit more than just faith.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 42 Kate Erbland
    While Moriarty’s novel functioned as a compelling story about two women from different backgrounds converging during a pivotal time in American history, Engler’s film turns much of its attention to Norma’s story, jettisoning the very best part of the film along the way.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 Kate Erbland
    You’ll have to wait a while before Tigerland introduces its eponymous stars, but like many elements of Ross Kauffman’s emotional, often harrowing new documentary, the eventual reveal will be worth it.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Erbland
    The third act is crammed with twists and revelations that ultimately seem forced, and can only offer truncated reconciliations. And yet there’s something to be said for the pleasure of watching Sasha, still a bit silly and definitely in need of more life experience, succeed on her own terms and in her very own movie.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 42 Kate Erbland
    When it works, it’s never better than a loving retread of the pleasures of the first film; when it doesn’t, it’s a head-scratcher of the highest order, a film that exists to push forward a franchise that seems to have already lost its way.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 83 Kate Erbland
    Every trope, twist, and trick of the genre is up for skewering in the comedy, but the film keeps things light and smart, never dipping into darkness or crass jokes. It’s funny because it’s clever, but it’s also never cruel.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 67 Kate Erbland
    The film is littered with jump scares, but most of them offer up shocking twists that land with genuine payoff: the score winds up, the framing gets tighter, the shots linger for longer, and when a different film might serve up a jump scare with a giddy “oh, it was nothing!” laugh, The Prodigy delivers something truly distressing.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Kate Erbland
    At least there’s Slate, who gamely approaches her character with sensitivity and care (the actress also produced the project) and keeps Frances grounded even as The Sunlit Night sputters around her.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 Kate Erbland
    Late Night smartly sends up not just the cloistered world of late night television, but a current cultural climate struggling to evolve in a changing world.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Erbland
    Knock Down the House takes its viewers on the inside of a propulsive movement that’s changing by the moment, an energetic look inside history as its being made, even when the results aren’t always the ones that are so fervently hoped for.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Kate Erbland
    The typical trappings of a reflective documentary about a larger-than-life star are all there, from nods to the weight of stardom and how political leanings can both help and harm a talent on the rise, but they’re made bigger and richer because it’s Crosby who is acknowledging them, unblinking.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 83 Kate Erbland
    More sad than salacious, it’s the rare film about a criminal that offers human details without humanizing a man who so many agree was a monster.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Kate Erbland
    Colaizzo’s script weaves in enough detail to explain some of Brittany’s demons, but Bell sells the tough stuff too, doing more with a cautious look in the mirror and a slow smile than other performers can do with an Oscar-ready speech.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Erbland
    Grainger and Shawkat are wonderful together, conveying the depth of a 10-year relationship with affection and honesty.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Kate Erbland
    The beats of Fighting With My Family are comfortingly familiar, and the soap opera pomp of the wrestling world is eye-popping to both fans and neophytes alike, but it’s Pugh that is always fresh, surprising, and wily. The film might not hit hard, but Pugh never stops doing just that.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Erbland
    Egg
    Egg shows the Scottish actor-director’s continuing ability to ground her films with strong character work and a buoyant sense of humor.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Kate Erbland
    Perfect Strangers takes too much time to get to its big game — nearly its full first act is consumed by introductions and set dressing, most of it unnecessary, considering how believable the group’s chemistry is — but once it kicks into gear, the effect is dizzying.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 58 Kate Erbland
    For all its of-the-moment charms, Escape Room can’t shake its more basic genre trappings, eventually giving itself over to tired and predictable revelations and flimsy twists.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 58 Kate Erbland
    Second Act never recovers from its big reveal, a cataclysmic (and nearly catastrophic) piece of narrative nuttiness that derails every scene, every performance, every subsequent revelation.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 33 Kate Erbland
    It's all a shell of itself, with Fred Savage on hand to occasionally note how weird this all is.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Erbland
    Lessons about loving oneself, accepting one’s faults, and being the best version of yourself are cheesy, but not without purpose. Call it cinematic comfort food, but Dumplin' knows how to satisfy.

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