Joshua Rothkopf

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For 1,012 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Joshua Rothkopf's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 The Conjuring
Lowest review score: 20 Paradise
Score distribution:
1012 movie reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Actor-turned-director Olivia Wilde (shockingly, this is her behind-the-camera feature debut) shows off something rarer than technique or comic timing. She’s got loads of compassion and has somehow managed to make a high-school movie without villains.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Mikkelsen is endlessly compelling.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    We’re here for the rigorously conceived, blessedly coherent action showdowns, the work of director Chad Stahelski.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 20 Joshua Rothkopf
    Seriously missing the memo in a cringe-inducing way, The Hustle takes a perfectly fine premise from Dirty Rotten Scoundrels—two predatory men get played by a savvier woman—and obliterates it by swapping genders and ultimately selling out its feminist credibility.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    But when it’s being dumb enough to have Charlotte drop molly and space out in an impromptu war room during a crisis, it has just the right amount of irreverence, thanks to fun performances (including one by O’Shea Jackson Jr. as Fred’s superwealthy friend, cruising on a LaCroix-fueled cloud of serenity).
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Endgame often pays tribute to itself, which makes it as fascinating as it is self-serious. It taps into a live wire of doomy tragedy and phoenix-like rebirth that comics do so well.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    It’s the opposite of frightening: a sludgy collection of tired jump scares, inexpertly mounted period décor—this time we’re in a too-shiny 1973 Los Angeles—and a continued slump into generic blahness.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    As dark spells go, Lane’s is complex, one that will lead viewers down a surprisingly benevolent path.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Feeling anything in a DC Universe installment is, in itself, evidence of filmmaking that’s superheroic (that overall bluish-gray glumness is completely gone). So imagine the shock to also encounter a nuanced, funny script, a richly developed surrogate family, a visual appreciation of Philadelphia and its heroic Rocky iconography, and not one but two expert jokes involving a strip club.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Still, you can’t help but be swept up by the sincerity here — that and the sight of a hard man softening to a sympathetic nuzzle. (This is some excellent equine acting.) The Mustang is leagues beneath the recent "The Rider" or "Lean on Pete," both superior in terms of articulating silent human-animal relationships that fulfill larger psychological needs.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Us
    Us is too confidently made, too expert in its scene-to-scene command, to call it an example of sophomore slump. Still, after the film reveals itself to be the home-invasion thriller it is (and then the lesser Invasion of the Body Snatchers it becomes), you feel a slight letdown.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Moore makes it all play like the classic club remix it is.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Brie Larson isn't given enough to do in a Marvel movie that marinates in '90s nostalgia but doesn't quite rise to the occasion of its own significance.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    While it’s unspooling, The Souvenir feels like the only film in the world—the only one that matters.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    There are occasional visual flourishes—a nightmarish PowerPoint presentation ending with a slide about mock burials—that hint at the better-balanced film The Report might have been. But mainly we’re pinned down by a firehose-stream of didactic outrage.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Like Barry Jenkins similarly set Medicine for Melancholy, The Last Black Man in San Francisco supplies positivity to the struggle.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Subtly, the film draws you into the science. You’ll be nervously eyeballing ticking velocity numbers in the corner of the screen. But always, Apollo 11 is about people working together in a single-minded spirit of peaceful ambition.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    After the Wedding contains enough domestic revelations for several seasons of something delicious, but Freundlish’s showdowns all seem to dissipate or get curtailed abruptly.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Merchant never loses our interest: He’s made a sparkly, strutting film that doesn’t apologize for or look down upon its heroes. A “soap opera in spandex” is what Hutch calls pro wrestling to his trainees, and the movie follows suit. Who doesn’t love a melodrama in tights once in a while?
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    It's diminishing returns for a horror sequel that grinds the original premise into the ground while shirking on scares.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    A cinematic memoir of once-in-a-decade emotional precision and ambition, Joanna Hogg’s The Souvenir does many things so exquisitely, it’s hard to know where to begin.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    A sumptuous romantic epic that's too polished for its own good.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 20 Joshua Rothkopf
    There’s a way to make this kind of trashy noir work beautifully—was Wild Things director John McNaughton somehow not available?—but Serenity is too blandly generic to stick its snout in the muck and luxuriate, barring the occasional jail-baity line of dialogue from Hathaway (“You said I was finally old enough,” Karen whispers, reminiscing).
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    It’s both stupefying and a little sad to realize that this is the movie Shyamalan wanted to make.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Ben Is Back has seriousness in mind, but too much showmanship in the making.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 20 Joshua Rothkopf
    A completely charmless, laughs-free experience.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    An uneven but fascinating spectacle.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Destroyer is a movie that confuses Kidman’s unmodulated funk for actual depth. In fairness, a brooding depression may be the reality of much police work, but onscreen it plays like a two-hour murder of our patience.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    The happy surprise, however, is that McKay has seasoned the meat in satisfying ways, salting it with wince-sharp performances and an almost experimental style of editing that creates an apocalyptic whirlwind. For those reasons alone, Vice feels particularly timely.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Glib, underdeveloped dreck.

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