John Anderson

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For 242 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

John Anderson's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Support the Girls
Lowest review score: 0 Nothing Like the Holidays
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 30 out of 242
242 movie reviews
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    A two-hour documentary that feels like three, it certainly has a worthy subject, and a charismatic one; it commits a trove of valuable cultural lore to posterity. But it also commits a sin in never finding its rhythm, or a through-line on which to hang one of the great stories of American popular music.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Colette is not really a coming-of-age story, except as regards France itself. It’s a liberation story, one witty enough to be worthy of its subject.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 30 John Anderson
    Almost the entire movie is lifted from other sources, and then edited in a way that makes his enemies (do they know they’re his enemies?) look as foolish as possible. The punditry is trite. The snark is boring.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 John Anderson
    Museo is in part a caper film, a heist film, and while it leans on such classics as “Topkapi” and “Rififi” the robbery has its own signature and is done in a visual style that’s hypnotic.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    The most serious flaw, and one that will irk a lot of Bel Canto enthusiasts, is the too-obvious lip-syncing of Ms. Moore to Ms. Fleming’s glorious singing. They simply don’t match up, and the music takes place at points in the film when viewers really don’t want to be thrown off. But thrown off they will be.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    That the circuitous international influence of the western should manifest itself in South Africa is no surprise. Neither is the fact that someone as charismatic as Mr. Dabula should be the star of such a story, which is ripe with indignation, injustice, righteous violence and, ultimately, a shootout of cosmic resonance.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    Making his film debut, Richie Merritt plays Rick as a sullen, evidently stupid and certainly uncharismatic schemer in possession of a modicum of animal cunning and perhaps a hint of personal insight. But there’s no life in his eyes. And little life in his acting. Which is too bad for Matthew McConaughey, who gives yet another terrific performance.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    It should be said right off that this provocative off-black comedy, starring the Gen-Xer’s dream cast of Keanu Reeves and Winona Ryder, is not for everyone. And the people it is for will have to be in the mood.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    A serviceable thriller, kind of an “Argo” in Argentina, replete with ornate preparations, plans gone awry and narrow escapes.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 John Anderson
    The unlikely, bittersweet, bristling comedy Support the Girls is easily one of the best films of the year, and the most sympathetic to women, despite having been made by a man. How can this be? Luckily, Andrew Bujalski’s remarkable movie — with its killer performance by Regina Hall — is not just about women. It’s about men being idiots. And no one is arguing ownership of that narrative.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Ms. Clarkson is always fascinating; only on second viewing did I notice how much Ms. Mortimer was doing while Mr. Nighy was stealing a scene. In the end, though, it’s his movie. And likely wasn’t supposed to be.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    Mr. Malek gives an eccentric performance, but he won’t make anyone forget Dustin Hoffman, whose original Dega was an endearing coward, a fatalist and a masterpiece.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 30 John Anderson
    It has its moments, several of which are provided by Ms. Rudolph, putting a spin on the girl-friday role. She has one scene of utter hilarity that shouldn’t be spoiled, and can’t be printed anyway, but may lead to “pilafing” becoming the word of the year on Urban Dictionary.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    Luckily, there are jokes, like little lifeboats, floating all around, rescuing “Like Father” from anything resembling gravity.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    The robbery isn’t sophisticated enough on its own to hold one’s interest.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    You can consume only so much gooey romanticism before someone gets seasick, and it’s precisely the soggy love story at the center of Adrift — a survival-at-sea adventure directed by the estimable Icelandic director Baltasar Kormákur — that prevents this storm-tossed vehicle from achieving maximum upthrust.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    A daring little drama with a heavyweight cast, a gracefully delivered message and a hellish problem — specifically, other people.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    Though clearly besotted with Crane’s poetry, the writer-director-star never achieves full immersion in the man’s life or work; the sense is of people playing a very cerebral game of dress-up.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    It’s a story that doesn’t quite follow the money. The money is a maguffin, as per Hitchcock.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    There’s a weariness to West of the Jordan River, both in the storytelling and the face of Amos Gitai.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Ms. McGowan has a wonderful face, and director Jenna Mattison spends a lot of time there. But the effectiveness of The Sound really comes from its atmospherics, which are rich and disturbing and a credit not just to the director but to composer Aaron Gilhuis and the people at Urban Post Production in Toronto.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 John Anderson
    Each of the five superb actors gets a moment of dramatic glory out of Mr. MacLachlan’s screenplay, which is about guilt, roots and the selfishness of implacable conviction. Each makes the most of it.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    A lot of Lucky is philosophical mischief, some of it is tediously ruminative, and some moments achieve a loveliness that belies the film’s craggy desert terrain, the earthiness of its characters and even the landscape of Mr. Stanton’s body.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    American Made is one of the many children of “Goodfellas,” a true-crime story turned first-person narrative told by a charismatic ne’er-do-well surrounded by dubious characters and tantalizing subplots. None of these offspring, including American Made, have matched the chilling grandeur of Martin Scorsese’s 1990 masterpiece, with its multifaceted characters and visual fluidity.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    Director David Gordon Green, working with screenwriter John Pollono’s adaptation of the book by Mr. Bauman and Bret Witter, maintains a brisk pace. There’s barely a maudlin moment, which is remarkable given the subject matter.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    The split screen has a downside: It punctuates the lopsidedness of the script by Anneke Campbell and Will Lamborn, Miguel’s story being far less convincingly written than Mark’s.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    An extremely good-natured, upbeat recounting of the infamous Bobby Riggs-Billie Jean King “man vs. woman” match of 1973.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    It is the library as an urgent idea, and the obligations that the institution’s leaders have embraced, that win Mr. Wiseman’s admiration and attention.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    When the film leaves the realm of the impolite or even criminal for something far more extreme, it achieves a level of excess that makes the whole enterprise increasingly cartoonish, rather than just awful.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    A kind of blues song in its own right, Sidemen: Long Road to Glory is an affectionate attempt to showcase three major figures in the development of Chicago blues, musicians who spent their entire lives eclipsed by the oversized stars they played with.

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