Jeannette Catsoulis

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For 1,308 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jeannette Catsoulis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Let It Fall: L.A. 1982-1992
Lowest review score: 0 Vice
Score distribution:
1308 movie reviews
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A movie that, for all its operatic allusions and actorly expertise, feels dismayingly passionless.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Don’t Leave Home is a frustratingly befuddled movie that’s nevertheless fascinating.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Lizzie isn’t perfect — the pacing can flag, and the lovely Kim Dickens, as Lizzie’s older sister, barely registers — but Ms. Sevigny’s intelligence and formidable control keep the melodrama grounded. Her empathy for Borden, whose fragile constitution belies a searing will, is palpable, as is the sense of inescapable peril surrounding the two female leads.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    All right, then, let’s rip off the Band-Aid: Destination Wedding is torture. And not just because this would-be romantic comedy is grating, cheap-looking and a mighty drag: it also turns two seasoned, likable actors into characters you’ll want to throttle long before the credits roll.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Wistful but never sentimental, it quietly turns the fortunes of one little store into a comment on the fate of many.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A Whale of a Tale is a rambling blend of complaint, tourism and straw-men arguments. What it’s not is persuasive.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    While you don’t require familiarity with the dozen or so earlier titles to enjoy this one, you do require a sense of humor that’s easily triggered and a gag reflex that isn’t.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Fragile yet resilient, We the Animals has an elemental quality that’s hugely endearing, using air and water and the deep, damp earth to fashion a dreamworld where big changes occur in small, sometimes symbolic ways.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Wrapping a political-corruption yarn in a blanket of bullets and blood, the Filipino director and co-writer, Erik Matti, slides visual and textual jokes into the mayhem in ways both sly and blatant.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Mr. Sauvaire’s approach may not be for everyone, but his skill and audacity are invigorating — and, strangely, liberating.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 30 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Unlike “Sharknado,” The Meg doesn’t seem to know how dumb it is.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Mr. Tyrnauer surreptitiously hoses away the layers of dirt to reveal the fragility of his subject’s anything-goes hedonism.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    By rights, Never Goin’ Back should be a chore to sit through. The jokes are dated, the behavior tasteless and the setups tired. Yet the movie has a ramshackle charm that’s due entirely to its vivacious leads, whose mutual devotion and easy, unlabeled sexuality feels endearingly innocent.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Ms. Dyrholm, photographed frequently in brutally unforgiving close-up, fully captures the faded charisma of the woman whose life reads like a Who’s Who of the New York midcentury art scene.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Swerving from predictable to confounding, dreamy to demented, artful to awkward, this genre-twisting hybrid from Juliana Rojas and Marco Dutra links art house and slaughterhouse with unexpected success.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The Captain, Robert Schwentke’s harrowing World War II psychodrama, isn’t what you would call enjoyable, exactly. More accurately, it compels our attention with a remorseless, gripping single-mindedness, presenting Naziism as a communicable disease that smothers conscience, paralyzes resistance and extinguishes all shreds of humanity.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Like a bedtime cup of cocoa, Marc Turtletaub’s Puzzle has a soothing familiarity that quiets the mind and settles the spirit.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Darting from micro to macro and back again, squashing obscene consumption against child beauty pageants and ruinous debt, its structure makes for an unfocused thesis. The through line, though, works, as Ms. Greenfield repeatedly turns her camera on her own family and career choices.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The filmmakers’ emphasis on drama honors the driven personality of their subject, while tracing a fairly conventional glad-rags-to-riches narrative arc.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    While Pin Cushion might prove too distressing for some, it’s still peculiarly, undeniably original.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Engrossing despite its daunting scope and tangled politics, The Other Side of Everything offers an uncommon opportunity to view the shifting borders and identities of an entire region through the eyes of the Eastern European intellectuals caught in the turmoil.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Self-pitying or smug, jaunty or crestfallen, callous or contrite, the movie’s fitful tone is fully yoked to Joaquin Phoenix’s sodden-to-sober lead performance.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This smart but uneven horror movie has little interest in fun.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Their narcissism is repellent yet riveting, and Mr. Côté comes at his subjects with an artful, exploratory obliqueness that’s endearingly curious, as if discovering a whole new species.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Maintaining an unrelentingly gleeful grip on the film’s tone, Mr. Sigurdsson skillfully whips absurdist comedy and chilling tragedy into a froth of surging hostilities.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Even the most ardent fan could find its bluntness uncomfortably timely: In our build-that-wall moment, a story about a government-sponsored plan to cull poor minorities feels less like political satire than current-affairs commentary.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Watching the men as they work, attend 12-step meetings and struggle to repair frayed familial bonds, she unearths moments of raw revelation that quietly highlight our shameful lack of effective help.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Gorgeously photographed by the Brazilian cinematographer Adriano Goldman, Dark River is a raw ballad of doom and damage.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Sad and sweet, and with a rare lyricism, The Cakemaker believes in a love that neither nationality, sexual orientation nor religious belief can deter.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    It’s all ridiculously romanticized and self-serving. But the performances are so good (Mr. Greyeyes, in particular, is a miracle of intelligence and dignity) and Michael Eley’s vistas, shimmeringly shot in New Mexico, are so stunning, it feels churlish to resist.

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