Jeannette Catsoulis

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For 1,288 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jeannette Catsoulis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Z for Zachariah
Lowest review score: 0 The Hottie & the Nottie
Score distribution:
1288 movie reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Engrossing despite its daunting scope and tangled politics, The Other Side of Everything offers an uncommon opportunity to view the shifting borders and identities of an entire region through the eyes of the Eastern European intellectuals caught in the turmoil.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Self-pitying or smug, jaunty or crestfallen, callous or contrite, the movie’s fitful tone is fully yoked to Joaquin Phoenix’s sodden-to-sober lead performance.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    This smart but uneven horror movie has little interest in fun.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Their narcissism is repellent yet riveting, and Mr. Côté comes at his subjects with an artful, exploratory obliqueness that’s endearingly curious, as if discovering a whole new species.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Maintaining an unrelentingly gleeful grip on the film’s tone, Mr. Sigurdsson skillfully whips absurdist comedy and chilling tragedy into a froth of surging hostilities.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Even the most ardent fan could find its bluntness uncomfortably timely: In our build-that-wall moment, a story about a government-sponsored plan to cull poor minorities feels less like political satire than current-affairs commentary.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Watching the men as they work, attend 12-step meetings and struggle to repair frayed familial bonds, she unearths moments of raw revelation that quietly highlight our shameful lack of effective help.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Gorgeously photographed by the Brazilian cinematographer Adriano Goldman, Dark River is a raw ballad of doom and damage.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Sad and sweet, and with a rare lyricism, The Cakemaker believes in a love that neither nationality, sexual orientation nor religious belief can deter.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    It’s all ridiculously romanticized and self-serving. But the performances are so good (Mr. Greyeyes, in particular, is a miracle of intelligence and dignity) and Michael Eley’s vistas, shimmeringly shot in New Mexico, are so stunning, it feels churlish to resist.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Self-satisfied and too slick by half, Boundaries projects a sheen of artifice that deflects any genuine engagement with the story.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Damsel may feel 20 minutes too long, but it fills them with attitude and cheek. Here, the frontier is not just a crucible of reinvention, but a wilderness that can make you more than a little crazy.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Capped by a truly lovely final shot, The Yellow Birds (the title comes from a particularly cruel Army cadence) is about unseen wounds and wasted lives. The closer we get to these young men, the closer we are to wondering how many more of these stories we can bear to hear.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    With its oversimplified emotions and dumbed-down depiction of the creative process, this inoffensive time-filler dissolves in the mouth like vanilla pudding.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    What’s left is a strange, sour tale that’s neither origin mystery nor journey of self-discovery, but a vexing gesture toward damage and delusion that never permits us to peek under its broken heroine’s hood.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The lack of chemistry between the two leads is less damaging than Ms. Bennett’s inability to commit to a tone.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Methodical and efficient, the script (by Mr. Young and Adam Frazier) gets some mileage from its generic setting and zombie-infection theme, even if the croaking order is easily predicted.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    How to Talk to Girls at Parties is a kitschy, spaced-out oddity. The energy peaks and droops, pogoes and flatlines, with Sandy Powell’s kooky costumes doing much of the visual heavy lifting.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Summer 1993 is movingly understated and beautifully acted.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Subtle and slow and wrenchingly empathetic, The Escape is about gradually realizing that the life you have may not be the one you want.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Bathed in a shadowy beauty and slippery psychological atmosphere, “Beast” soars on Ms. Buckley’s increasingly animalistic performance.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 20 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Featuring more twists than a 1960s dance marathon, Terminal is a flashy, hyperstylized bore.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jeannette Catsoulis
    A low-key character study whose gently repetitive rhythms mask an unusually keen sense of nuance and subtlety.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The two leads are sensational, but the movie, drained of its life force and stuffed with confusing plot complications — like a shoehorned-in undercover agent and some mysterious Albanians — never recovers.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Ray Meets Helen has a wistful, whimsical sophistication that has all but disappeared from movies. Filled with imaginative visuals populated by the ghosts of the gone and hopes for the future, the movie is wonderfully, magically humane.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    The Cleanse” embarks on an allegorical journey with only the vaguest notion of a destination. As a result, the movie feels frustratingly repetitive — a single joke repeated ad nauseam.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Working from Peter Bognanni’s 2010 novel, the writer and director, Peter Livolsi, has created a painfully quirky tale that’s so contrived you can almost hear the gears of the plot grinding.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Ava
    Lurching relentlessly from one conflict to another, the movie distills its emotions — and maintains its momentum — in conversations of remarkably controlled intensity.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Whenever the movie tries to say something insightful about racial integration — or education, or any number of issues — it backs off or bogs down. It’s so tonally and ideologically unfocused that its ideas just slip away.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Jeannette Catsoulis
    Managing to feel at once painfully slow and bafflingly truncated, this creaky triptych of not-so-scary tales is a tame curiosity of movie nostalgia.

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