For 349 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Inkoo Kang's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Tully
Lowest review score: 10 Walter: Lessons from the World's Oldest People
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 82 out of 349
349 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 30 Inkoo Kang
    If you like postmodern gimmickry and modern dance, and are OK with sitting through nearly 10 minutes of staged talking-head interviews, glum stoner talk about abortion, nausea-inducing filmmaking, characters whose motivations don’t make sense, horror, exploitative child death, and a quasi-coercive lesbian make-out—but just don’t care to be reminded “Drugs! Are! Bad!”: Leave 89 minutes in. Or don’t come at all, because Climax really isn’t about anything more than that.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Inkoo Kang
    Despite the production’s team of scientist consultants, the physics in The Wandering Earth is probably a lot of hooey. But the film’s world building, which takes up much of its first third, is undeniably novel and fascinating. Rarely does a film brag such a technocratic heart.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Inkoo Kang
    Natalie might protest the whitewashing of New York by rom-coms, but Isn’t It Romantic trots out multiple supporting characters of color whose sole roles are to make the white protagonist look good.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    A high-concept comedy about the domestication of a work-obsessed woman that nonetheless managed to win me over.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Inkoo Kang
    The sum amounts to far less than its parts, but oh, what parts!
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Inkoo Kang
    A movie so lifeless you’d have more fun guessing the Netflix niche group that the production is supposed to satisfy.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Inkoo Kang
    The depiction isn’t remotely believable, but with Ronan endowing her character with both a steel spine and a fresh-faced naïveté (in a performance that makes her the film’s sole great asset), it’s fun, even inspiring.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Inkoo Kang
    In the movies, love is cheap. It’s everywhere and nowhere, too often reduced to a formula or a reward. Beale Street knows better. It restores to love, romantic and familial, its sanctity—an ambition that makes it one of the most distinctive love stories in recent memory.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Inkoo Kang
    For all its gentle groundedness, a quality that suffuses much of Kore-eda’s work, Shoplifters strenuously resists romanticizing its main characters. Its compassion is more convincing for it. So is its brilliance.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Inkoo Kang
    There’s something unseemly about singling out this story, about the seemingly narrow scope of racism and how easily it can be undone. Green Book decries those cultural pockets designed to make white people feel good, often at people of color’s expense. But that’s about all it does, too.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Inkoo Kang
    Cam
    The wonderfully versatile Brewer, who’s in virtually every scene, pulls off essentially three “characters”: Alice, Alice as Lola, and Bizarro Lola. It’s a bravura performance that flits between several realities while keeping the film grounded as the plot twists make narrative leap after narrative leap.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Inkoo Kang
    The Nutcracker’s onslaught of wholesomeness also lays waste to anything that might stand in its way, leaving it crushed under the boot heels of its tin soldiers.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Inkoo Kang
    As Burning unfolds, it reveals new thematic layers until the film brims with allegorical potential.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Inkoo Kang
    Wildlife is a confident and compassionate first film. But with its protagonist mostly relegated to waiting and observing, its main raison d’être is Mulligan’s masterful turn as a thirtysomething woman coldly testing her abilities to see what she’s capable of, while terrified that she won’t be able to provide a good life for her son.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Inkoo Kang
    The lack of a precipitating factor, the invisible impulses behind addiction, and the episodic nature of recovery don’t exactly lend themselves to a compelling narrative structure.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Inkoo Kang
    Until its resolution, Bad Times is a fun-enough romp through retro genre pleasures. But when it drags in the real world in its final scenes, it reveals itself to be just as fatuous as most such nostalgic pastiches tend to be.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    Private Life is certainly very good at shivving its characters at close range and gutting these dyspeptic, privileged white people when they deserve it. Save for Sadie’s charmed fate, I can’t fault Private Life for nailing what it sets out to accomplish. But its cultural narrowness, however well-expounded, also left me wondering about the trials and tribulations of all the other couples in that waiting room long after we’d seen the last of them.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    Al-Mansour is both a natural and highly imperfect pick to adapt Trisha R. Thomas’ novel.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Inkoo Kang
    The second hour, though, strides toward its impressively unstinting resolution with magisterial confidence. With the characters finally stripped of the hardness they’d been forced to wear, their raw selves glisten in the sun until it’s time to wearily tie the carapace back on.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 20 Inkoo Kang
    The commitment of its all-star cast — which includes Oscar Isaac, Annette Bening, Mandy Patinkin, Antonio Banderas, Olivia Wilde, Olivia Cooke, and Samuel L. Jackson — can’t divert from the fact that its quills droop and sag, where they haven’t fallen off altogether. Behold the other North American flightless turkey.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    A Simple Favor reintroduces Lively as a character actress—a sexy, funny, award-worthy revelation.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 10 Inkoo Kang
    A joyless, soulless slog, wasting the efforts of co-stars Melissa McCarthy and Elizabeth Banks.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    If Searching prefers to focus on plot mechanics over emotion, it at least makes up for it with minor but significant developments in Asian American representation. Given the predominance of the cultural and generational gap between parents and children in Asian American narratives, from "The Joy Luck Club" to "Master of None," it’s refreshing to see an example of assimilated families, whose numbers will only continue to increase.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 30 Inkoo Kang
    First-time feature writer Sofia Alvarez’s attempt to shrink Han’s lengthy, largely internal, and culturally specific story into a 97-minute movie is, simply put, a botch job. Stilted and scattered and strangely cold in its cinematography, it’s a handsomely shot whole lotta nothin’.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Inkoo Kang
    BlacKkKlansman may well be the first film to frame the Trump era as one of regression in response to the progress of the Obama years.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Inkoo Kang
    Emotionally layered, culturally specific, and frequently hilarious, Crazy Rich is a transportive delight, with food montages to die for (the film offers a splendid showcase of Singapore’s justly celebrated street-food scene) and a wedding processional so exquisite I started crying at its sheer beauty.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Inkoo Kang
    Lines that should be funny are sacrificed to the breathless exigencies of the plot. The movie starts to feel like a slow suffocation.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    It’s an important corrective to many contemporary and historical accounts of Hollywood, reinstating the queerness that has too often been straight-washed out of them.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Inkoo Kang
    Directors Ian Bonhôte and Peter Ettedgui’s smartest tactic — the one that makes McQueen such a pleasure to watch, even for fashion outsiders — is giving viewers a front-row seat to the runway, then letting us judge the designer’s oeuvre for ourselves.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Inkoo Kang
    The dual portrait that Blindspotting offers is heady and dense and mighty compelling.

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