For 1,130 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Glenn Kenny's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Ghostbox Cowboy
Lowest review score: 0 I Know Who Killed Me
Score distribution:
1130 movie reviews
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Glenn Kenny
    It took me a while to realize she actually IS Shania Twain, because I initially thought “What does Shania Twain need this kind of low-rent enterprise for?” Maybe she really wanted to meet Travolta.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 30 Glenn Kenny
    Out of Blue botches the source material’s story, misses its mordant humor and inverts its despairing core. Much of this is the filmmaker’s prerogative. But “Out of Blue” doesn’t strike out only as an adaptation. What it offers on its own is tepid and predictable.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Glenn Kenny
    While Nemes’s near-subjective technique can generate genuine tension, it more often yields anxious tedium.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 38 Glenn Kenny
    As revisionist as it might aspire to be, Never Grow Old is rife with clichés, Cusack’s philosophical villain one of the most conspicuous.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Glenn Kenny
    The movie intersperses observations and speculations on Welles’s life and work with long looks at his graphic pieces. These are fascinating.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Glenn Kenny
    This movie packs in plenty of cinema acrobatics and spectacle without ever feeling out of control, even as it morphs into a far-fetched whodunit.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Glenn Kenny
    In watching a newly restored version, I was struck not only by Björk’s distinctive charisma at 24 years old but also by the talent of the film’s writer, director and editor, Nietzchka Keene.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Glenn Kenny
    Like his prior film, 2015’s “Mountains May Depart,” this new picture from master Jia Zhangke is a three-part drama spanning decades. To this critic Ash is Purest White is a much more successful attempt at depicting a changing China through the lives of not-quite-tragic characters and their sufferings.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    The mode of humor is close to cliquish anticomedy, and viewers not attuned to it may feel like there’s a joke they’re missing.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Glenn Kenny
    In its poetic, elliptical, concise way, this film makes a grand statement: The black mother is the mother of life itself. And the gaze directed at the black faces and bodies in “Black Mother” is not a male gaze, or a documentarian’s gaze. It is a gaze of love.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    While the viewer can intuit that Hanish has a strong clear story to tell, the director too often tricks things up.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Glenn Kenny
    Stewart recounts how he thought that if his films could make people love these animals, he could push popular opinion against their being hunted. He doesn’t quite pull this off here, despite impressive footage of him swimming with sharks. He does, however, convince us that these superpredators are important to oceanic ecosystems and that because they are so indiscriminate in their eating habits, they are full of toxins.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Glenn Kenny
    Mapplethorpe, directed by Ondi Timoner, is a fictionalized biography of the photographer that is most alive when it’s putting its subject’s pictures on the screen, which it does often. And should have done more, because the movie is otherwise as timid as its subject was bold.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Glenn Kenny
    Although we know how the mission turns out, the movie generates and maintains suspense. And it rekindles a crazy sense of wonder at, among other things, what one can do practically with trigonometry.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Glenn Kenny
    As competently put together as this movie is, it imparted to me no sense of a higher calling, and thus left me unmoved.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    Because Eklof’s approach is formally very clean, showing some genuine, intriguing detachment, I’m apt to prefer it to Seidl’s work. But not by much.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Glenn Kenny
    The movie’s most provocative aspect is its near-methodical portrayal of hive-mind thinking pursued as a kind of norm — not just by the examiners, but the hopeful applicants.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Kenny
    Such is the nature of this movie. It’s like a series of charcoal sketches with marginalia; there are unexpected mini-flashbacks, and even a visualization of a poem. Hong’s free style isn’t showy; there’s a stillness holding the film together at all times.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    Jessica Rothe as Tree is still an appealing presence. But the film is overstuffed with unfunny self-parodying gore slapstick, half-felt sentimentality and semi-meta sci-fi.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Glenn Kenny
    It took a while for this digressive movie to get its hooks in me, but once it did, Sorry Angel didn’t let go.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Glenn Kenny
    Despite being well shot, confidently written, and acted with a surfeit of commitment by most of its cast (Mendelsohn, who not for the first time reminded me uncomfortably of Trivago pitchman Tim Williams, is director Forrest’s ex-husband), I found the world it presented both smugly insular and overfamiliar.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Glenn Kenny
    I suppose there are some who will get off on this movie’s competence and uber-sincerity, but I found the premise one or two bridges too far. Sam Elliott junkies, too, are sure to be delighted.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Glenn Kenny
    This documentary makes a powerful case that the city’s lost dead are due more honor than what Hart Island currently extends.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Glenn Kenny
    Most of this movie, which is almost entirely in English, is taken up with tone-deaf humanist tales.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Glenn Kenny
    The movie gains momentum as it indulges in hallucinogenic phantasmagoria. Whatever you make of its intentions, it’s certainly exceptional in its visual distinction.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Glenn Kenny
    Peirone’s everything-but-the-kitchen-sink directing does tend to head butt her thin writing, but the movie eventually coalesces as a sly, bitter parable against chasing-your-dreams optimism.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 90 Glenn Kenny
    The confident storytelling and the bravura acting — Daveed Diggs, Toni Collette and John Malkovich contribute compelling caricatures — carry “Buzzsaw” all the way home.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Glenn Kenny
    Some scenes in this film, directed by Jon Kauffman, put across the perversity of prison social ecosystems. But the picture’s gender and race dynamics, not to mention its forced star-crossed lovers theme, are sufficiently commonplace to register as hackneyed.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Glenn Kenny
    The director and his editor, Amanda Larson, construct the movie in a fairly conventional way, but leave a single string dangling, which they pull tight to devastating emotional effect near the end.
    • 12 Metascore
    • 20 Glenn Kenny
    The single achievement of I Hate Kids, a new comedy directed by John Asher, is that it is simultaneously tepid and offensive.

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