For 992 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 75% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 23% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 13.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Eric Kohn's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 77
Highest review score: 100 A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night
Lowest review score: 16 Wish Upon
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 18 out of 992
992 movie reviews
    • 89 Metascore
    • 83 Eric Kohn
    Combining first-rate skate video footage with a range of confessional moments, Minding the Gap is a warmhearted look at the difficulties of reckoning with the past while attempting to escape its clutches.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 83 Eric Kohn
    Even as the story drifts off, Night Eats the World derives its power from a beguiling, provocative implication: It’s hard to confront a hostile world, but gathering the courage to do so doesn’t make the job any easier.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 42 Eric Kohn
    Skyscraper plays out like a metaphor for diminishing returns — Johnson keeps climbing, higher and higher, until there’s nowhere left to go but down.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    While Zagar doesn’t force the material into many surprising places, it’s a fully realized tapestry, owing much to the complex, layered score by Nick Zammuto that hums through nearly every scene, and frequent cutaways to hand-drawn animation based on the scrapbook that Jonah stores under his bed at night.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Eric Kohn
    The First Purge is another absurd B-movie, uneven and ludicrous across the board, but altogether transfixing for the way it funnels Trump-era terror into an empowering crowdpleaser.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Eric Kohn
    The essence of Ant-Man is inherently silly, and that’s where the strength of the new movie lies.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Eric Kohn
    It’s a powerful look at the durability of parent-child bonds as well as a fascinating psychological thriller about what it takes to heal such a rift when it seems irreparable.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 42 Eric Kohn
    The Fallen Kingdom is at its worst when attempting topicality (the testosterone-fueled Wheatley refers to one of our heroes as a “nasty woman”) or when beefing up its crass plot.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Eric Kohn
    Sorry Angel doesn’t strain from too much ambition; it’s a sharp snapshot of two men at pivotal moments in their lives, and ends on a note not too different from the one it starts on. But that cycle is central to its gentle intellectual flow.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Eric Kohn
    Wanuri Kahiu’s sophomore feature is just good enough to give its modest intentions a historic purpose, bringing fresh context to an old formula while hitting the expected emotional beats.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 83 Eric Kohn
    Rise to the challenge, and payoff awaits on the other side: a formulaic story transformed into something more perceptive and profound. If only more family dramas took such care to get the details right.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Eric Kohn
    The best thing about writer-director A.B. Shawky’s feature-length debu...is the way it burrows inside Beshay’s life without devolving into a pity party.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Eric Kohn
    The unexpected love child of Wong Kar-wai and Andrei Tarkovsky, “Long Day’s Journey Into Night” transforms from a lush, slow-burn pastiche to an audacious filmmaking gamble while maintaining the pictorial sophistication of its earlier section. It’s both languorous and eye-popping at once.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Eric Kohn
    The Man Who Killed Don Quixote sits alongside much of Gilliam’s late period work as a messy but singular achievement that strains to make its disparate parts fit together, but there’s a noble spirit of invention to its wackiness anyway.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Eric Kohn
    More media installation than movie, The Image Book bemoans a vapid world well into the process of disintegration, and his film is engineered to simulate that process in visceral terms.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Eric Kohn
    The movie lulls you into its unpredictable rhythms, and a striking poetry creeps into the material, finally overtaking it.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Eric Kohn
    While it’s less than the sum of its parts, those parts know how to deliver.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Eric Kohn
    Abbasi grounds the narrative in an emotional foundation even as it flies off the rails.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Eric Kohn
    Though salvaged in parts by Lindon’s impassioned performance and a few perceptive asides that hint at a better version of the events, At War is mostly a redundant portrait of working-class struggles that does more to belittle the efforts of its subjects than position them in galvanizing terms.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Eric Kohn
    Hamaguchi finds ways of crystallizing the movie’s themes, lingering on contemplative moments that position the entire story as a metaphor for the contrast between the fantasies and realities of relationships, as well as the messy negotiation required to navigate those extremes.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    Burning keeps twisting back on itself, charting the path of a man waking up to the world, only to find that it won’t stop messing with him.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 83 Eric Kohn
    It’s fascinating to watch Mitchell grasp for a bigger picture with the wild ambition of his scruffy protagonist.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    The House That Jack Built is an often-horrifying, sadistic dive into a psychotic internal monologue, with intellectual detours about the nature of art in the world today, and puts considerable effort into stimulating discomfort at key moments. If you meet the work on those terms, or at least accept the challenge of wrestling with impeccable filmmaking that dances across moral barriers, it’s also possibly brilliant.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Eric Kohn
    While it never reaches the psychedelic heights of Guerra’s previous effort and relies on a more conventional pattern of events, Birds of Passage delivers another fascinating tone poem about Colombia’s fractured identity.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Eric Kohn
    Even as Three Faces staggers along, it maintains the unique blend of introspection and intrigue that defines this singular director’s talent.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Eric Kohn
    Gaspar Noé’s remarkable psychedelic ride is his most focused achievement, a concise package of sizzling dance sequences and jolting developments that play like a slick mashup of the “Step Up” franchise and “Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom,” not to mention the disorienting cinematic trickery of Noé’s own provocative credits.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Eric Kohn
    It’s a taut setup that risks veering into soapy territory, but Farhadi reveals just enough involving details to pause at individual moments and rest on more intimate observations.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Eric Kohn
    Racer and the Jailbird speeds along at an engaging clip, but never overcomes the fundamental simplicity of its plot.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 33 Eric Kohn
    After 85 minutes of mediocrity, The Week Of finally lands on one inspired bit, and then there’s another half hour to go.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Eric Kohn
    Less cohesive documentary than feature-length red flag, The Bleeding Edge assembles a range of talking heads and upsetting case studies to target several key villains.

Top Trailers