David Edelstein

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For 2,053 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Edelstein's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
Lowest review score: 0 Movie 43
Score distribution:
2053 movie reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    I’m not a fan of Schnabel’s paintings, but I think he’s a born film painter, and even if At Eternity’s Gate doesn’t reliably cross the blood-brain barrier, his frames are like no one else’s. (His cinematographer is Benoît Delhomme.)
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    On paper it sounds cringeworthy, but much of it is great fun. Mortensen is cartoonish in the most marvelous way.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Outlaw King has a wild card — a really wild card — in Aaron Taylor-Johnson’s Lord of Douglas, whose family the English humiliated. He’s so wild that as soon as he reconquers his castle, he burns it to the ground for spite. In battle, he screams in exaltation, and just when you wonder how he’ll top that, he screams again, even louder, now drenched — sopped — in gore. That you won’t get to see that in IMAX is a war crime.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 David Edelstein
    The best thing about the film The Front Runner is that it gives Gary Hart, the Colorado senator and 1984 and ’88 presidential candidate, a measure of dignity, and today’s audiences a historical context in which to view his missteps.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Lucas Hedges has a difficult job — to portray a teenager whose best option is to reveal nothing of himself. The key is to make that lack of “reveal” an active rather than passive process, and Hedges does it with remarkable intelligence. His indecision is alive and moving.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    The Coens’ newest Western, The Ballad of Buster Scruggs, might be their bleakest work of all, and one of their richest.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    If you’re immune to Malek, there’s no hope for you. The actor might not be as handsome as Mercury and might not do much actual singing (it’s all Freddie), but he’s nearly as magnetic, and he makes you believe that that voice is coming out of that body — an amazing feat.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Don't dig too deep into The Other Side of the Wind: It's largely surface. But what a surface. And what a chest of toys for a man who never lost his childlike delight in playing with the medium.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 David Edelstein
    An interesting take. The problem is that Guadagnino can’t cast a decent spell.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    A test of an actor is playing someone who’s split in so many ways that he moves forward while looking backwards and vice versa, and Chalamet is already a master.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    Bad Times at the El Royale isn’t an event. But I was never too bored.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The movie’s central motif — rituals that dull pain and heighten unhappiness — doesn’t clobber you. It seeps into you.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Jenkins and cinematographer James Laxton’s palette is rich and warm, its colors deepened by a score by Nicholas Britell that ranges from a distant, forlorn trumpet to a string quartet in which the players dig in as if they’re having their own dialogue between hope and despair. The close-ups are immense, the emotions archetypal.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The Predator throws enough at you to keep you distracted from seeing all the marks it’s not quite hitting. Rhodes’s pop-top vet is amusing and scary in equal measure, and little Jake Tremblay is as good as you’d hope, especially when his Rory mouths off to the Machiavellian Traeger on the subject of reverse psychology.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    The movie, believe it or not, gives pleasure. It’s a stark, violent, cynical but thoroughly entertaining caper picture.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Green’s Halloween doesn’t have the geographical simplicity — the elegance — of Carpenter’s. It’s a bit all over the place. But I love how he takes memorable images from the original and turns them on their heads.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    I have zero doubts about the first half of A Star Is Born — it couldn’t be more charming.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    First Man might be the most grounded space movie ever made — grounded in the tension between technology that’s almost laughably fragile (the astronauts really do seem as if they’re going up in tin cans) and the sheer evolutionary imperative of family.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    This isn’t his smoothest film, but it’s his fullest and most original. It’s also his most urgent, which is really saying something. It’s one of the most urgent films ever made.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 David Edelstein
    The fleeting good moments in Operation Finale come from a few of the actors.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 30 David Edelstein
    The Happytime Murders turns out to be a stupefyingly sh—y puppet movie.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Crime + Punishment makes you angry and scared in equal measure. What it doesn’t do is illuminate the sources of this evil. What about the majority of cops who know the 12 are right but shun them anyway? Would you trust them if they stopped you on the street?
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 David Edelstein
    The skateboarding and camaraderie are contrapuntal notes, liberating flurries of motion in a powerful saga of kids who were — and in some cases still are — miserably stuck in place.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    So there you have it. A Prayer Before Dawn: Fine entertainment. Fine teaching tool.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    Blaze’s best scene features Kris Kristofferson as Foley’s once-abusive, now near-senile father and Alynda Segarra as his sister, who escaped the old man’s malevolent influence by finding Jesus.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Lee doesn’t do subtlety. But the movie is very entertaining and comes with a stupendous, lushly melodic score by Terence Blanchard.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 David Edelstein
    Thrillingly confounding.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 David Edelstein
    Though slow, it’s intense, and you’re hooked from its first scene — Angel’s final meeting with the detention authorities — to its last, wrenching image. Spiro is a real filmmaker.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    It’s tough to sustain a story line this thin for two hours, and the movie runs down at the two-thirds mark.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Edelstein
    You don’t have to be a moralist to see the tragedy of Scotty Bowers’s life. You only have to have an eye for things that don’t fit comfortably. Tyrnauer has that, as well as the compassion not to probe too deeply. What’s onscreen is enough to make you conclude that you can’t make people truly happy without fixing the world.

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