Chris Nashawaty

Select another critic »
For 569 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Chris Nashawaty's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Locke
Lowest review score: 0 Kin
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 16 out of 569
569 movie reviews
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Chris Nashawaty
    Heartwarming, mildly funny, and occasionally thrilling without ever being anything more than just fine.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 58 Chris Nashawaty
    Yes, it’s easy to be impressed by the world that Shyamalan has created and now fleshed out, but it would be nice if we were also moved to feel something too. In the end, Glass is more half empty than half full.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Nashawaty
    The reason that this old-fashioned movie works as well as it does is the transformative commitment of its two leads. They’re both clowns crying on the inside, who, despite years of resentment, know they’re more than partners; they’re uneasy soul mates stuck in one last “fine mess” together.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 83 Chris Nashawaty
    Director Pawel Pawlikowski’s Cold War resembles a waking dream. And a ravishingly romantic one at that.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Nashawaty
    If Marwencol made your heart go out to Mark, Welcome to Marwen does something quite different. It makes you want to back away from him slowly.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Chris Nashawaty
    For all of its brutal, raw force, Labaki’s excellent film is tough sledding — a sucker punch that lands with the emotional force of Dickens relocated to the slums of the modern-day Middle East. It leaves a bruise.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Nashawaty
    The Mule fits the 88-year-old Eastwood perfectly. Not just because there probably aren’t many roles for actors of his age out there, but also because its lack of judgment makes sense for a star who’s always been as willing to play anti-heroes as heroes.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 42 Chris Nashawaty
    Wan, a director who’s proven himself to be a can’t-miss ace regardless of genre (from the horror formulas of The Conjuring and Insidious to the big-budget tentpole mayhem of Furious 7) seems to finally be out of his depth. He’s conjured an intriguing world, but populated that world with dramatic cotton candy and silly characters, including a hero who’s unsure if he wants to make us laugh or feel — and winds up doing neither. Pass the Dramamine.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 58 Chris Nashawaty
    Despite all of the film’s retro-future eye candy, it never quite sweeps you out of your seat and transports you someplace new. It’s a squeaky salvage job that could have used a fresh dose of oil to make it hum.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Nashawaty
    Corbet doesn’t seem as interested in the answers to the provocatively glib questions he raises as he is in creating a cynical riddle cloaked in style. No doubt some will find all of this to be a deep meditation on the pop-industrial complex, but from where I was sitting, it just felt like empty camp.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 83 Chris Nashawaty
    Creed II slavishly follows the sentimental-palooka Rocky template as if it were a sacred text. Still, it doesn’t make those old rope-a-dope tropes any less effective.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Nashawaty
    Two of the chapters stand with some of the best work the merry-prankster filmmakers have ever done, while the rest are varying degrees of… fine.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Nashawaty
    At its heart (and it’s a big corny heart, for sure), the film’s message is one of unconditional love and embracing family wherever you find it. It’s hard to argue with. Especially when it’s served up with such spiky laughter-through-tears sweetness.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 83 Chris Nashawaty
    A surprisingly well-made mash-up of old-fashion war movie tropes and proudly disgusting horror-flick shocks. It’s a ton of fun.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Chris Nashawaty
    Now a miscast Claire Foy adopts the hacker vigilante’s black leather and badass avenging-angel attitude for The Girl in the Spider’s Web — a disappointingly safe, by-the-numbers action-thriller.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Chris Nashawaty
    More narratively straightforward (but also masterfully edited in F for Fake style), the documentary takes its title from a Welles quote about the fickle hypocrisy of the movie business and about his other favorite subject: himself. And that quote couldn’t have been more spot-on for a man who was most appreciated most only when it was too late.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Nashawaty
    The Other Side of the Wind (both the movie and the movie-within-a-movie) is a hypnotic, magical mess of a film. It’s a lot of story and not enough of one. Still, there are shots that are so haunting and beautifully composed that you want to get out of your seat and take up residence in them.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Nashawaty
    Boy Erased is the kind of topical, well-intentioned movie that makes you wish it was slightly better than it is.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Chris Nashawaty
    Viper Club is an earnest and often engaging film that’s undeniably heartfelt. It’s capital-I important and timely. But without its star’s passionate, nuanced performance, it would run the risk of being a bit generic and forgettable.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Chris Nashawaty
    The Guilty is an absolute workout that pulls the rug out from under you just when you think you have it figured out. The last ten minutes will keep you rattled long after you’ve left the theater.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Chris Nashawaty
    It’s likely to be enjoyed more by audiences unfamiliar with the original.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Chris Nashawaty
    Few filmmakers can turn a mundane town council meeting about a library bench into a meditation on patriotism and civic responsibility the way Wiseman can. Let’s hope his camera continues to roll for years to come.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Chris Nashawaty
    Wildlife is confident and patient and mature. It may be a small film, but its power is massive. Especially its very last shot, which is so devastating it has the force of a sucker punch.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Chris Nashawaty
    While it’s loaded with excellent ensemble performances and flashes of real poignancy, it can’t seem to help itself from occasionally jack-knifing into heavy-handed wrong turns that can play as clichéd or phony. It’s half of a great movie.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Chris Nashawaty
    Netflix feels like a proper home for a film this idiosyncratic. After all, you’ll know within 30 minutes stumbling onto it whether you want to keep following its unsettling descent into blood-soaked madness or pick up your remote and head over to the relatively sunnier and safer comforts of "Broadchurch."
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Chris Nashawaty
    Taken together, the film is kaleidoscopic, sober, and also a bit glib. 22 July is exceptionally choreographed and tough to sit through, but it also leaves an uneasy, bitter aftertaste knowing that the movie is probably exactly the kind of continued attention a deranged narcissist like Breivik would have wanted.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Chris Nashawaty
    Everett’s utterly fantastic performance as Wilde slightly exceeds his grasp as a first-time filmmaker.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 Chris Nashawaty
    One of the great surprises of Matt Tyrnauer’s giddy glitterbomb of a documentary about New York’s infamously Caligulan Me Decade hot spot is discovering how much of our culture (the drugs, the music, the sexual liberation) is wrapped up in one nightclub that existed for a mere 33 months.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 91 Chris Nashawaty
    In The Great Buster, Bogdanovich has provided a brilliantly enthralling primer.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Chris Nashawaty
    It’s about perseverance, compassion, and empathy.

Top Trailers