For 178 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 61% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

April Wolfe's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Revenge
Lowest review score: 0 Life Itself
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 15 out of 178
178 movie reviews
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 April Wolfe
    Unfortunately, the film, written by Alan McDonald from a short by the late Viner Ryan McHenry, at times comes closer to a facsimile than a parody. When McPhail does hit the high notes, however, he really hits them.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 April Wolfe
    The best I can say about Buster Scruggs is that it seems as though the Coens picked their favorite actors and wrote them a part specifically tailored to their abilities.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 April Wolfe
    Simultaneously entertaining, overwhelming, compelling, and grating, Bodied raises its hand and talks until words mean nothing and everything.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 April Wolfe
    I’m happy to report that I have no idea what’s going on in Luca Guadagnino’s Suspiria remake, and that’s wonderful. The two Suspirias function more as companion pieces than as mirrored twins.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 94 April Wolfe
    Like another breakout independent film this year, “The Tale,” Tan’s documentary attempts to portray her own narrative with objectivity and distance, but she discovers along the way that such a thing may not be possible, that memories will wait years or decades to snag you in their truths.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 April Wolfe
    Too often, in this version, Green doesn’t seem to know where to put the camera to elicit that sense of surveilling or being surveilled. Worse, that incompetence often works hand in hand with overwrought comic dialogue. But let’s get to what really works here: Curtis.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 April Wolfe
    To fall in love with Bradley Cooper’s A Star Is Born is to embrace its paradoxes and, to quote a song Lady Gaga sings in the film, go “off the deep end” and submerge oneself “far from the shallow.” My advice? Submit. Suspend yourself in the charms and romance of this melodrama.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 10 April Wolfe
    What’s most dizzying about this film has nothing to do with political messages; those are all too clear. Instead, it’s the particularly mean and bizarre humor that boggles the mind.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 April Wolfe
    Monsters and Men seems as if it was made for the world that existed a few years ago. I honestly can’t tell if my dissatisfaction is with the movie or the era into which it is released.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 April Wolfe
    Bad Reputation comes off more as a fanboy’s declaration of reverence to the queen rather than an interrogation of one of the most iconic women in music.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 0 April Wolfe
    The Crash-meets–Collateral Beauty false-gravitas joke of the year.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 April Wolfe
    More times than I could count I had no idea what the hell was happening, and also just didn’t care that I didn’t know. Let the Corpses Tan is that strange and beautiful.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 April Wolfe
    Though nearly nothing happens in this movie besides a woman opening a shop and beginning a standoffish friendship with a reclusive man, I still found myself drawn in, just as I was drawn to Iain’s discreet disaster of a baked Alaska (please check it out if you haven’t seen this TGBBS episode); sometimes the quiet is enticing.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 April Wolfe
    Though the script by Chaganty and Sev Ohanian is taut and surprising, I’ve felt more absorbed in an episode of Murder, She Wrote than I did in this film, because, there, it’s story and performance that we’re invited to savor, not just tech and technique.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 April Wolfe
    Juliet, Naked has its charms, and they are named Rose Byrne and Ethan Hawke.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 April Wolfe
    It is the depth Close lends to Joan that kept me riveted — and angry.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 April Wolfe
    In Skate Kitchen, the kids come as they are, and they’re wildly fascinating.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 April Wolfe
    Mitchell’s documentary style isn’t flashy or refined, but it is economical. The director does his homework and almost cross-examines the film’s subjects.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 April Wolfe
    Filmed in black and white in the wintry countryside of Görlitz, Germany, Schwentke’s vision of a man who would be posthumously named the Executioner of Emsland is chilling and yet, at times, almost farcical.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 April Wolfe
    For all its inventive and impressive technique, the film lacks fun; a lot of folks, myself included, need very little reminding that the Internet is a threat and that terrible men are actively out there abducting and terrorizing girls and women for lulz.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 April Wolfe
    This film seems meant to be more a kind, sweet eulogy than an illumination.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 April Wolfe
    Despite the subject matter, Haq is most often quite tender in her storytelling.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 April Wolfe
    I will be very clear with you, dear readers, that this surrealist comic moral tale, about a poor man selling his soul to ascend in a golden elevator to the heights of a dubious corporation, is a balls-to-the-wall, tits-to-the-glass, spectacular orgy of fist-pumping, anti-capitalist, pro-labor ideas rolled into 105 minutes of gloriously unpredictable plot.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 April Wolfe
    The closest comparison for this film is 2017’s joyfully schlocky Beyond Skyline, though that boasted far more original set pieces. Bleeding Steel seems content to rehash old ones, cutting and pasting Chan into familiar scenes, with the welcome exception of one battle that takes place atop the Sydney Opera House — but I’ll be damned if I could figure out why or how they got there.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 April Wolfe
    If there’s one thing I can say for this movie, it’s that the cast is delivering, even if the story they’re in cannot.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 April Wolfe
    Where Feste best succeeds in Boundaries isn’t in the father-daughter relationship, which finds her straining for a tight resolution, but in the mother-son one, where the two actors vibe easily and persuasively off each other.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 April Wolfe
    Del Toro and Moner say everything that’s needed with pained, bewildered eyes. Meanwhile, Graver speaks with relentless American cynicism. He is both funny and unnerving, and maybe more unnerving because he’s being funny.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 April Wolfe
    What Moors offers that’s new is a kind of unfolding mystery, as we come to find what really happened to Murphy in the war zone. Too bad that the pacing is botched and that the whole narrative becomes one long dirge of “and then, and then, and then.”
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 April Wolfe
    Half the Picture is maddening and enlightening and, most of all, necessary, as much as I wish it weren’t.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 April Wolfe
    In Aster’s story, as in life, the devil is in the details. As the film goes on, these details accumulate, coalesce, and then hang heavy over the characters.

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