For 1,829 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

A.O. Scott's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Citizenfour
Lowest review score: 0 MacGruber
Score distribution:
1829 movie reviews
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    “Fallen Kingdom,” directed by J. A. Bayona, is in most respects a dumber, less ambitious movie than its immediate predecessor, and also, for just that reason, a little bit more fun. Some of its high jinks have a hokey, silly, old-fashioned mad-scientist feeling to them, especially when the dinosaurs are chasing people or vice versa. Which is reasonably often.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    More than a simple tribute or a fond remembrance, it is a remarkable and full-throated elegy, a work of art that is full of life.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Tag
    Tag, unlike too many of its recent ilk, at least bothers to be a movie, rather than a television sketch distended to feature length. The performers don’t seem to have been shoved in front of the camera and instructed to be funny. They have to work for their laughs, and to find coherence as an ensemble.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    The film, Mr. Aster’s debut feature, is engaging, unsettling and unpredictable, generating a mood of anxious fascination punctuated by frequent shocks and occasional nervous giggles. But I also found it a bit disappointing.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    It is that emphasis — the earnest, critical attention to the public Mister Rogers and his legacy — that makes Won’t You Be My Neighbor? feel like such a gift.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    The chronological back-and-forth diffuses the dread and suspense — the feeling of desperate uncertainty implied by the title — that might have made for a more intense, more memorable yarn.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    The film, written and directed by Bart Layton, can’t quite decide what it wants to be: a slick, speedy caper; a goofball comedy; or a commentary on the state of the American soul. It’s none of those — a tame and toothless creature that is neither fish nor fowl.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    This account is plausible and moving, at once a defense of genre fiction and of female creativity. But at times the differences between male and female writers can seem a bit schematic, in a way that undermines Mary’s intellectual autonomy.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 A.O. Scott
    It is the portrait of a soul in torment, all the more powerful for being so rigorously conceived and meticulously executed.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    These women — Ms. Fonda, Ms. Keaton, Ms. Steenburgen and Ms. Bergen, that is — have nothing to prove. Each one brings enough credibility and charisma to Book Club to render its weaknesses largely irrelevant.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Onscreen, On Chesil Beach loses some intensity at the end, as the supple suggestiveness of Mr. McEwan’s prose is replaced by the stagy literalness of film. Perhaps this couldn’t be avoided.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    It doesn’t take itself too seriously, but it also holds whatever irreverent, anarchic impulses it might possess in careful check.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    There is something ever so slightly dishonest about this character, something false about the boundaries drawn around his sadism and his rage. Deadpool 2 dabbles in ugliness and transgression, but takes no real creative risks.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    The zaniness is pretty low-key, and what we witness is less the explosion of pent-up energy than the gentle affirmation of exuberant kindness.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    The Day After, one of three films this prolific director brought to festivals in 2017 (another one screened in Berlin in February), is an especially elegant presentation of some of his [Mr. Hong’s] characteristic concerns.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Revenge leaves a lurid, punchy afterimage, an impression somewhere between righteous delight and quivering revulsion. It’s both a challenge and a calling card, in which Ms. Fargeat at once exposes what’s wrong with her chosen genre and demonstrates her mastery of it.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    The cast is great. The play is great. But this is still a bad movie, because it has no clear or coherent idea of how to be one.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    The Guardians is a historical drama that doesn’t lose itself in decorative period detail, a beautifully photographed chronicle of rural existence that refrains from picturesque sentimentality and grinding misery, the usual modes for this kind of film.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    RBG
    Directed by Betsy West and Julie Cohen, the film is a jaunty assemblage of interviews, public appearances and archival material, organized to illuminate its subject’s temperament and her accomplishments so far.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Ms. Binoche, effortlessly charismatic and ruthlessly unvain, has no investment in the character’s likability. She and Ms. Denis could not care less what you think of her. Let the Sunshine In commits itself to taking Isabelle on her own terms. The challenge, for her and for the audience, is to figure out what those terms are.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    Where you end up may not be where you thought this was going. The final act, including the post-credits sting (to infinity and beyond, as it were) brings a chill, a darkness and a hush that represent something new in this universe.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    For hard-core Godardians, Godard Mon Amour will be an indispensable hate-watch. For the Godard-ambivalent, the critical outrage of the partisans will provide its own kind of amusement. But you don’t need to have strong feelings about Godard to notice the off flavors in this airy, brightly colored macaron.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Nothing too grand or grave is at stake here. No special cultural or historical importance can be derived from the Borg-McEnroe battle, but sports don’t always carry that kind of significance. Borg vs. McEnroe is a modest, tactful movie about two guys who, at their peak, were neither.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 A.O. Scott
    Ms. Zhao’s commitment to her craft — she knows how to take care and when to take risks — matches Brady’s. She has an eye for landscape and an acute sensitivity to the nuances of storytelling, a bold, exacting vision that makes The Rider exceptional among recent American regional-realist films.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Whether or not events actually unfolded this way, the story the film tells is an interesting and complicated character study, with something to say about the corrosive effects of power and privilege on both the innocent and the guilty.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The gravity and force of Mr. Phoenix’s performance and Ms. Ramsay’s direction are impressive, but it’s hard not to feel that their talents have been misapplied, and that there is less to the movie than meets the eye.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Spielberg, a digital enthusiast and an old-school cineaste, goes further than most filmmakers in exploring the aesthetic possibilities of a form that is frequently dismissed and misunderstood.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Maineland takes up a large and complicated set of topics — the global economy, the shifting relations between East and West, the commodification of American education — and addresses them with understated delicacy.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    What should unfold like an unsettling chapter in a long, tragic story — or a tale of cruelty and heroism — feels more like an old TV show. Everybody is going through the motions.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Oyelowo is without a doubt the best thing in Gringo, supplying the only grace notes in a cacophony of secondhand attitude and facetious overacting.

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