Alan Zilberman

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For 58 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Alan Zilberman's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 The Little Stranger
Lowest review score: 0 Hillary's America: The Secret History of the Democratic Party
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 35 out of 58
  2. Negative: 13 out of 58
58 movie reviews
    • 53 Metascore
    • 12 Alan Zilberman
    “Chaos” might have been better had the filmmaker revisited his interview subjects now that we are deep into Trump’s presidency. But that would have required additional work. If the film is a testament to anything, it’s Stern’s laziness.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Zilberman
    As a director, Abrahamson uses that sense of the detached observer as a scalpel, whittling away at our expectations of horror films until we have no choice but to look at — and really listen to — what is happening. It’s an approach that requires patience, on his part and ours, but the rewards are worth it.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 88 Alan Zilberman
    The result is an unabashedly violent B-movie throwback, the sort director John Carpenter used to make, with moments that resonate with real life.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Zilberman
    This shrewdly observed story asks another question: Is civilization possible in a nation where discrimination has such deep roots? In Sweet Country, the answer arrives with a tough fatalism.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Alan Zilberman
    It is not exactly a thriller, yet its plausibility will inspire very real anxiety.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Alan Zilberman
    The Kennedy dynasty has its share of admirers and critics alike, and — to the film’s credit — director John Curran and his screenwriters do not appease either camp. The result is a challenging character study, punctuated by moments of uneasy suspense and dark humor.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Alan Zilberman
    This is a film that encapsulates the anxiety of the present moment, complicated by friendships that lean, at times, toward outright hostility.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Alan Zilberman
    Nothing about this film feels remotely safe. Unlike the “Fifty Shades” series, Double Lover has little interest in romance, instead considering the psychological impulses that inform it.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Alan Zilberman
    No Greater Love gets at the camaraderie — and the contradictions — of military service in a way that few films ever have.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Alan Zilberman
    Writer-director Jason Hall astutely conveys these and other facets of the modern veteran’s experience, generating authentic drama, in scenes that play out in unexpected ways.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Zilberman
    The story by screenwriter William Nicholson (“Everest”) jumps from one major episode in Robin’s life to another, but with none of those episodes delving into his interior life, Breathe remains a superficial tear-jerker.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Alan Zilberman
    Director Reginald Hudlin handles the story with just enough finesse to make its details more thrilling than uneasy.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Alan Zilberman
    Defiantly inscrutable, Woodshock can test a viewer’s patience, yet the filmmakers’ consistent self-confidence creates an alluring, oddly hypnotic effect.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Zilberman
    Despite flashes of brilliance, strong performances and innovative camera techniques, the film never rises above the schmaltz of an after-school special.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Alan Zilberman
    This is slow, almost languid filmmaking, yet it’s a delight to watch the countless ways in which the library is still capable of lifting us.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Zilberman
    Without a clear narrative, the story recedes in the face of the movie’s stylized violence — which is, admittedly, glorious, even brazen.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Alan Zilberman
    “Corner” is a deeply sympathetic tale, using the possibilities of animation not just to pique curiosity, but to devastate.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Alan Zilberman
    By focusing on the details of his characters’ lives, Weinstein finds common ground on both sides of the religious divide.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 25 Alan Zilberman
    From the Land of the Moon features a typical Cotillard performance, yet the romance, from French actress and filmmaker Nicole Garcia, manages to convey neither triumph nor tragedy.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Alan Zilberman
    Strange Weather is wise about loss, showing the ripple effects of an untimely death. It is hardly an original concept, yet it handles this subject with the care and integrity it deserves.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Zilberman
    Marie Noelle fills the story with passion, debate and human contradiction. If the material ultimately eludes the director’s grasp, wandering off on unfocused tangents, it’s because of its ambition.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Zilberman
    O’Reilly’s ambitions notwithstanding, “Moscow” is uneven because of the inescapable nature of such interlocking narratives: some land better than others.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Alan Zilberman
    "Farewell to Europe” is a little like Zweig himself: smart, overly fastidious and remote to a fault. By avoiding Zweig’s inner life, his eventual collapse seems all the more perfunctory.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 37 Alan Zilberman
    Biography, at its most useful, disabuses us from myth, but Churchill has no such ambitions. As both history and entertainment, it’s a drag.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Zilberman
    The cumulative effect is closer to a didactic after-school special for troubled parents.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Alan Zilberman
    Malek’s talents serve a much more personal, ultimately touching story.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Alan Zilberman
    O’Shea follows his twisted premise to its inexorable conclusion, so his film is ultimately more unnerving than sad.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 25 Alan Zilberman
    Guaglione and Resinaro strive to find meaning in Mike’s struggle, even when the script and its conclusion all point to a message that is more senseless, even bleak.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Alan Zilberman
    Raw
    Few films are both genuinely erotic and off-putting enough to inspire the occasional walkout. Raw succeeds at both.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Alan Zilberman
    This is not a film about Neruda’s life or controversial death. This is a film for folks who are unfamiliar with the writing of Neruda, or maybe even skeptical about poetry in general. They may not cherish every word of the poet’s most heartbreaking lines, but they’ll understand the man who wrote them a little better those who already do.

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